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  1. Create a stored procedure with user1 and grant execute to user2.

    login with user1
    
    CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE DEL_ROWS (arg IN VARCHAR2 )  AS
    BEGIN
        //delete rows
    END DEL_ROWS;
    
    GRANT EXECUTE ON DEL_ROWS TO USER2;
    
    logout user1
    
  2. Execute stored procedure with user2. It successfully deletes the rows.

    login user2
    
    DEL_ROWS('arg');
    
    //success
    
    logout user2
    
  3. Insert some rows into the table

     login user1
     insert some rows in the table
     logout user1
    
  4. Execute stored procedure with user2 again. This time, does not delete rows.

    login user2
    DEL_ROWS('arg');
    
    //does not delete rows
    
  5. If I assign the GRANT EXECUTE again, it deletes the rows.

Is there anything I am missing while granting execute permission ?

2
  • In step 4, when it "does not delete rows", does it throw an error? Also, you might want to modify DEL_ROWS to write a line such as "DEL_ROWS called" to DBMS_OUTPUT - that way you can verify that the procedure was called. Commented Aug 7, 2018 at 2:25
  • 1
    The question assumes a premise which is not true. You don't need to re-grant the permission, but in your particular test case it has a side effect that causes the script to work. Commented Aug 7, 2018 at 2:52

1 Answer 1

5

My suspicion is that you're not committing the transaction when you insert rows in step 3.

When you call GRANT EXECUTE from user 1 in step 5, that counts as a DDL. DDL's automatically commit the transaction after finishing, so it may be that the row insertion DML only gets committed at that point.

Try running the commit; command after inserting rows in step 3 as user 1 (if you aren't already). Also, try a select count(*) from table; query in step 4 as user 2 to see if user 2 actually sees any rows that it could delete.

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