7

I was trying to solve a problem in Codility provided below,

Write a function:

class Solution { public int solution(int[] A); }

that, given an array A of N integers, returns the smallest positive integer (greater than 0) that does not occur in A.

For example, given A = [1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2], the function should return 5.

Given A = [1, 2, 3], the function should return 4.

Given A = [−1, −3], the function should return 1.

Assume that:

N is an integer within the range [1..100,000]; each element of array A is an integer within the range [−1,000,000..1,000,000]. Complexity:

expected worst-case time complexity is O(N); expected worst-case space complexity is O(N) (not counting the storage required for input arguments).

I write the solution below which gives a low performance, however, I can't see the bug.

public static int solution(int[] A) {

        Set<Integer> set = new TreeSet<>();

        for (int a : A) {
            set.add(a);
        }

        int N = set.size();

        int[] C = new int[N];

        int index = 0;

        for (int a : set) {
            C[index++] = a;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {

            if (C[i] > 0 && C[i] <= N) {
                C[i] = 0;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {

            if (C[i] != 0) {
                return (i + 1);
            }
        }

        return (N + 1);
    }

The score is provided here,

enter image description here

I will keep investigating myself, but please inform me if you can see better.

  • I can write better solution, but get puzzled on this – Arefe Aug 7 '18 at 6:07
  • @ruakh Collections.sort() and his solution works – XtremeBaumer Aug 7 '18 at 6:12
  • @ruakh You're right :-) ... but maybe this belongs on Code Review since it's already running... – Tim Biegeleisen Aug 7 '18 at 6:12
  • 1
    @TimBiegeleisen With a correctness of 20%, it absolutely does not belong on Code Review. The speed is irrelevant as long as it simply doesn't work. – Mast Aug 7 '18 at 6:14

32 Answers 32

19

If the expected running time should be linear, you can't use a TreeSet, which sorts the input and therefore requires O(NlogN). Therefore you should use a HashSet, which requires O(N) time to add N elements.

Besides, you don't need 4 loops. It's sufficient to add all the positive input elements to a HashSet (first loop) and then find the first positive integer not in that Set (second loop).

int N = A.length;
Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<>();
for (int a : A) {
    if (a > 0) {
        set.add(a);
    }
}
for (int i = 1; i <= N + 1; i++) {
    if (!set.contains(i)) {
        return i;
    }
}
  • How would you find the first positive integer not in the set in n time? n is the size of the input, not the maximum possible integer of the problem. – Jorge.V Aug 7 '18 at 6:20
  • 1
    @Jorge.V since N is the size of the input, the first positive integer not in the input is at most N+1 (if the input array contains all the numbers between 1 and N). Therefore the second loop will run at most N+1 iterations. Hence O(N). – Eran Aug 7 '18 at 6:22
  • @Eran you could set the size of your hash set, not that it makes much of a difference, but it would prevent the possibility of having to search inside of each bin. – matt Aug 7 '18 at 6:42
  • @matt I guess you can set the initial capacity to N to save the need to resize the backing HashMap, but on the other hand, it would be wasteful if most of the input numbers are negative (and therefore not added to the Set). – Eran Aug 7 '18 at 6:46
  • such an easy and understandable solution :) – Pranali Rasal Aug 1 at 7:35
4

Here is my PHP solution, 100% Task Score, 100% correctness, and 100% performance. First we iterate and we store all positive elements, then we check if they exist,

function solution($A) {

    $B = [];
    foreach($A as $a){ 
        if($a > 0) $B[] = $a;   
    }

    $i = 1;
    $last = 0;
    sort($B);

    foreach($B as $b){

        if($last == $b) $i--; // Check for repeated elements
        else if($i != $b) return $i;

        $i++;
        $last = $b;        

    }

    return $i;
}

I think its one of the clears and simples functions here, the logic can be applied in all the other languages.

4

100% result solution in Javascript:

function solution(A) {
    // only positive values, sorted
    A = A.filter(x => x >= 1).sort((a, b) => a - b)

    let x = 1

    for(let i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        // if we find a smaller number no need to continue, cause the array is sorted
        if(x < A[i]) {
            return x
        }
        x = A[i] + 1
    }

    return x
}

  • Looks like they changed the tests: chaotic sequences length=10005 (with minus) got 2 expected 101. I think the question on the site is not well written... – OctaviaLo Aug 24 at 9:36
2

You're doing too much. You've create a TreeSet which is an order set of integers, then you've tried to turn that back into an array. Instead go through the list, and skip all negative values, then once you find positive values start counting the index. If the index is greater than the number, then the set has skipped a positive value.

int index = 1;
for(int a: set){
    if(a>0){
        if(a>index){
            return index;
        } else{
            index++;
        }
    }
}
return index;

Updated for negative values.

A different solution that is O(n) would be to use an array. This is like the hash solution.

int N = A.length;
int[] hashed = new int[N];

for( int i: A){
    if(i>0 && i<=N){
        hashed[i-1] = 1;
    }
}

for(int i = 0; i<N; i++){
    if(hash[i]==0){
        return i+1;
    }
}
return N+1;

This could be further optimized counting down the upper limit for the second loop.

  • expected worst-case time complexity is O(N); - adding N elements to a TreeSet requires O(NlogN) time. – Eran Aug 7 '18 at 6:30
  • @Eran I thought the first concern was getting it correct. I don't know an O(N) solution offhand. – matt Aug 7 '18 at 6:32
  • 1
    Does your code work for this set[]={1,4} .I think you will not get the min positive integer. – Nivedh Aug 7 '18 at 6:36
  • @Nivedh The first method I wrote would return 2 in that case. I updated it because it was broken for negative numbers. I also added an O(n) version. – matt Aug 7 '18 at 6:49
  • 1
    @matt The second solution is impressive. I'd use a boolean[] to express the intent that this is a flag, and rename it from hash to or appeared. And you can have N = A.length + 1, which will make the other code slightly simpler and easier to understand, as it can become appeared[i], and if (!appeared[i]) return i;. – Christian Hujer Aug 7 '18 at 9:00
1

If the space complexity is O(1) and the array can be modified then it could be as follows:

public int getFirstSmallestPositiveNumber(int[] arr) {
    // set positions of non-positive or out of range elements as free (use 0 as marker)
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (arr[i] <= 0 || arr[i] > arr.length) {
            arr[i] = 0;
        }
    }

    //iterate through the whole array again mapping elements [1,n] to positions [0, n-1]
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        int prev = arr[i];
        // while elements are not on their correct positions keep putting them there
        while (prev > 0 && arr[prev - 1] != prev) {
            int next = arr[prev - 1];
            arr[prev - 1] = prev;
            prev = next;
        }
    }

    // now, the first unmapped position is the smallest element
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (arr[i] != i + 1) {
            return i + 1;
        }
    }
    return arr.length + 1;
}

@Test
public void testGetFirstSmallestPositiveNumber() {
    int[][] arrays = new int[][]{{1,-1,-5,-3,3,4,2,8},
      {5, 4, 3, 2, 1}, 
      {0, 3, -2, -1, 1}};

    for (int i = 0; i < arrays.length; i++) {
        System.out.println(getFirstSmallestPositiveNumber(arrays[i]));
    }
}  

Output:

5

6

2

  • Yes, I knew about this solution. Another easy way would be to mark all the values with indexes i (where 1 <= i <= N-1 and ) negatives and then if we find a positive number, we will return that. – Arefe Aug 7 '18 at 7:06
  • @Arefe sorry, I didn't get how another solution would work. For example, how will it work for a {3, 2, 1} array? – Anatolii Aug 7 '18 at 8:14
  • In this case you return N+1 – Arefe Aug 7 '18 at 8:16
  • 1
    @Arefe Sure, but I didn't get the exact steps that the algorithm will do to achieve this. – Anatolii Aug 7 '18 at 8:47
  • I post an answer to attain your query – Arefe Aug 7 '18 at 9:13
1

I find another solution to do it with additional storage,

/*
* if A = [-1,2] the solution works fine
* */
public static int solution(int[] A) {

    int N = A.length;

    int[] C = new int[N];

    /*
     * Mark A[i] as visited by making A[A[i] - 1] negative
     * */
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {

        /*
         * we need the absolute value for the duplicates
         * */
        int j = Math.abs(A[i]) - 1;

        if (j >= 0 && j < N && A[j] > 0) {
            C[j] = -A[j];
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {

        if (C[i] == 0) {
            return i + 1;
        }
    }

    return N + 1;
}
  • 1
    With your algorithm, a sample test like {-1, 2} will return 2 instead of 1. The problem is that 0 position is occupied by the negative value (-1) and your if (A[i] > 0) check will return false for it. – Anatolii Aug 7 '18 at 9:36
  • ok cant do it O(1) space, needed storage. The answer is updated – Arefe Aug 7 '18 at 10:27
  • Actually, you can do it without using additional storages if the negatives are set to 0 earlier ie you have done in your example. – Arefe Aug 8 '18 at 4:23
  • No storage is needed for this. And no need to tamper with the original array by setting anything to 0 Take a look at my solution – TimeTrax Sep 14 '18 at 12:12
1
//My recursive solution:

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        return next(1, A);
    }
    public int next(int b, int[] A) {
        for (int a : A){
            if (b==a)
                return next(++b, A);
        }
        return b;
    }
}
  • 1
    Can you please add some text explaining why your answer works – Suit Boy Apps Oct 31 '18 at 23:31
  • It's good you tried and find a recursive solution I was not aware of. However, it requires a sorting in the primary method before can start the recursion and hence, can't be solved with O(N). Have a great day. – Arefe Nov 2 '18 at 1:33
  • It can be done by recursion without sorting: pastebin.com/yERsyKzV – vigneault.charles Apr 1 at 0:17
  • The solution does not finish in O(n) time. e.g. [n, n-1, n-2, ....., 2, 1] will provide the worst performane O(n^2) – Nitesh May 13 at 14:03
  • The solution is correct but it's performance-intensive and won't pass in the Codility – Arefe Aug 6 at 8:37
1

No need to store anything. No need for hashsets. (Extra memory), You can do it as you move through the array. However, The array has to be sorted. And we know the very most minimum value is 1

import java.util.Arrays;
class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
        Arrays.sort(A);     
        int min = 1; 
            int cap = A.length; //for efficiency — no need to calculate or access the array object’s length property per iteration 

        for (int i = 0; i < cap; i++){
            if(A[i] == min){
                min++;
            }
        }   
        //min = ( min <= 0 ) ? 1:min; //this means: if (min <= 0 ){min =1}else{min = min} you can also do: if min <1 for better efficiency/less jumps
        return min;    
    }
}
1
package Consumer;


import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

public class codility {
public static void main(String a[])
    {
        int[] A = {1,9,8,7,6,4,2,3};
        int B[]= {-7,-5,-9};
        int C[] ={1,-2,3};
        int D[] ={1,2,3};
        int E[] = {-1};
        int F[] = {0};
        int G[] = {-1000000};
        System.out.println(getSmall(F));
    }
    public static int getSmall(int[] A)
    {
        int j=0;
        if(A.length < 1 || A.length > 100000) return -1;
        List<Integer> intList = Arrays.stream(A).boxed().sorted().collect(Collectors.toList());
         if(intList.get(0) < -1000000 || intList.get(intList.size()-1) > 1000000) return -1;
         if(intList.get(intList.size()-1) < 0) return 1;
        int count=0;         
         for(int i=1; i<=intList.size();i++)
         {
             if(!intList.contains(i))return i;
             count++;
         }
         if(count==intList.size()) return ++count;
        return -1;
    } 
}
  • Answers should consist of more than a mere code-dump. If you think the question is poorly asked, you can flag it or post a comment. – Gendarme Feb 13 at 21:11
1
    public int solution(int[] A) {

    int res = 0;
    HashSet<Integer> list = new HashSet<>();

    for (int i : A) list.add(i);
    for (int i = 1; i < 1000000; i++) {
        if(!list.contains(i)){
            res = i;
            break;
        }
    }
    return res;
}
  • 1
    Please explain your answer. – MrMaavin Feb 14 at 13:44
1

Works 100%. tested with all the condition as described.

//MissingInteger
    public int missingIntegerSolution(int[] A) {
        Arrays.sort(A);
        long sum = 0;
        for(int i=0; i<=A[A.length-1]; i++) {
            sum += i;
        }


        Set<Integer> mySet = Arrays.stream(A).boxed().collect(Collectors.toSet());
        Integer[] B = mySet.toArray(new Integer[0]);
        if(sum < 0)
            return 1;

        for(int i=0; i<B.length; i++) {
            sum -= B[i];
        }

        if(sum == 0) 
            return A[A.length-1] + 1;
        else
            return Integer.parseInt(""+sum);
    }

int[] j = {1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2,5};

System.out.println("Missing Integer : "+obj.missingIntegerSolution(j));

Output Missing Integer : 7

int[] j = {1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2};
System.out.println("Missing Integer : "+obj.missingIntegerSolution(j));

Output Missing Integer : 5

1

This solution is in c# but complete the test with 100% score

public int solution(int[] A) {
    // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
    var positives = A.Where(x => x > 0).Distinct().OrderBy(x => x).ToArray();
    if(positives.Count() == 0) return 1;
    int prev = 0;
    for(int i =0; i < positives.Count(); i++){

        if(positives[i] != prev + 1){
            return prev + 1;
        }
         prev = positives[i];
    }
    return positives.Last() + 1;
}
  • Good to see other languages around – Arefe May 8 at 4:19
1

I achieved 100% on this by the below solution in Python:-

def solution(A):
   a=frozenset(sorted(A))
   m=max(a)
   if m>0:
       for i in range(1,m):
           if i not in a:
              return i
       else:
          return m+1
   else:
       return 1
1

For JavaScript i would do it this way:

function solution(arr)
{
    let minValue = 1;

    arr.sort();

    if (arr[arr.length - 1] > 0)
    {
        for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
        {
            if (arr[i] === minValue)
            {
                minValue = minValue + 1;
            }
            if (arr[i] > minValue)
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return minValue;
}

Tested it with the following sample data:

console.log(solution([1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2]));
console.log(solution([1, 2, 3]));
console.log(solution([-1, -3]));
  • 1
    Thanks a lot. Love to see the JavaScript here. – Arefe Jun 13 at 15:51
  • (@U2m: Love to see the JavaScript here as an answer to a question you tagged java? How come?) – greybeard Jun 13 at 16:41
  • @greybeard I commented because its primarily an algo question. – Arefe Jun 13 at 18:29
  • I've seen that there were php and python answers as well, so i was thinking maybe someone looking for javascript one :))) – Skitsanos Jun 17 at 16:16
  • Not a big fan of JavaScript, but, I see it's fine here ;) – Arefe Jun 24 at 20:29
1

My solution in JavaScript, using the reduce() method

function solution(A) {
  // the smallest positive integer = 1
  if (!A.includes(1)) return 1;

  // greater than 1
  return A.reduce((accumulator, current) => {
    if (current <= 0) return accumulator
    const min = current + 1
    return !A.includes(min) && accumulator > min ? min : accumulator;
  }, 1000000)
}

console.log(solution([1, 2, 3])) // 4
console.log(solution([5, 3, 2, 1, -1])) // 4
console.log(solution([-1, -3])) // 1
console.log(solution([2, 3, 4])) // 1

https://codesandbox.io/s/the-smallest-positive-integer-zu4s2

1
<JAVA> Try this code-

private int solution(int[] A) {//Our original array

        int m = Arrays.stream(A).max().getAsInt(); //Storing maximum value
        if (m < 1) // In case all values in our array are negative
        {
            return 1;
        }
        if (A.length == 1) {

            //If it contains only one element
            if (A[0] == 1) {
                return 2;
            } else {
                return 1;
            }
        }
        int i = 0;
        int[] l = new int[m];
        for (i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            if (A[i] > 0) {
                if (l[A[i] - 1] != 1) //Changing the value status at the index of our list
                {
                    l[A[i] - 1] = 1;
                }
            }
        }
        for (i = 0; i < l.length; i++) //Encountering first 0, i.e, the element with least value
        {
            if (l[i] == 0) {
                return i + 1;
            }
        }
        //In case all values are filled between 1 and m
        return i+1;
    }
Input: {1,-1,0} , o/p: 2
Input: {1,2,5,4,6}, o/p: 3
Input: {-1,0,-2}, o/p: 1
1

For Swift 4

func solution(_ A : [Int]) -> Int {
     var positive = A.filter { $0 > 0 }.sorted()
     var x = 1
     for val in positive{
    // if we find a smaller number no need to continue, cause the array is sorted
    if(x < val) {
        return x
    }
    x = val + 1
}
return x

}

1

My code in Java, 100% result in Codility

import java.util.*;

class Solution {
   public int solution(int[] arr) {
     int smallestInt = 1; 

    if(arr.length == 0) return smallestInt;

    Arrays.sort(arr);

    if(arr[0] > 1) return smallestInt;
    if(arr[ arr.length - 1] <= 0 ) return smallestInt; 

    for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
        if(arr[i] == smallestInt){ 
         smallestInt++;}    
    }

    return smallestInt;
}

}

1

My answer in Ruby

def smallest_pos_integer(arr)
  sorted_array = arr.select {|x| x >= 1}.sort
  res = 1

  for i in (0..sorted_array.length - 1)
    if res < sorted_array[i]
      return res
    end
    res = sorted_array[i] + 1
  end
  res
end
  • Funny how many languages are arrived ;) – Arefe Jul 23 at 9:40
1

Here's my solution in C++. It got a 100% score (100% correctness, 100% performance) (after multiple tries ;)). It relies on the simple principle of comparing its values to their corresponding index (after a little preprocessing such as sorting). I agree that your solution is doing too much; You don't need four loops.

The steps of my solution are basically:

  1. Sort and remove any duplicates. There are two possible methods here, the first one utilizing std::sort, std::unique, and erase, while the second one takes advantage of std::set and the fact that a set sorts itself and disallows duplicates
  2. Handle edge cases, of which there are quite a few (I missed these initially, causing my score to be quite low at first). The three edge cases are:
    • All ints in the original array were negative
    • All ints in the original array were positive and greater than 1
    • The original array had only 1 element in it
  3. For every element, check if its value != its index+1. The first element for which this is true is where the smallest missing positive integer is. I.e. if vec.at(i) != i+1, then vec.at(i-1)+1 is the smallest missing positive integer.
  4. If vec.at(i) != i+1 is false for all elements in the array, then there are no "gaps" in the array's sequence, and the smallest positive int is simply vec.back()+1 (the 4th edge case if you will).

And the code:

int solution(vector<int>& rawVec)
{
    //Sort and remove duplicates: Method 1
    std::sort(rawVec.begin(), rawVec.end());
    rawVec.erase(std::unique(rawVec.begin(), rawVec.end()), rawVec.end());

    //Sort and remove duplicates: Method 2
    // std::set<int> s(rawVec.begin(), rawVec.end());
    // rawVec.assign(s.begin(), s.end());

    //Remove all ints < 1
    vector<int> vec;
    vec.reserve(rawVec.size());
    for(const auto& el : rawVec)
    {
        if(el>0)
            vec.push_back(el);
    }

    //Edge case: All ints were < 1 or all ints were > 1
    if(vec.size()==0 or vec.at(0) != 1)
        return 1;

    //Edge case: vector contains only one element
    if(vec.size()==1)
        return (vec.at(0)!=1 ? 1 : 2);

    for(int i=0; i<vec.size(); ++i)
    {
        if(vec.at(i) != i+1)
            return vec.at(i-1)+1;
    }
    return vec.back()+1;
}
1

This code has been writen in Java SE 8

import java.util.*;

public class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {        

        int smallestPositiveInt = 1; 

        if(A.length == 0) {
            return smallestPositiveInt;
        }

        Arrays.sort(A);

        if(A[0] > 1) {
            return smallestPositiveInt;
        }

        if(A[A.length - 1] <= 0 ) {
            return smallestPositiveInt;
        }

        for(int x = 0; x < A.length; x++) {
            if(A[x] == smallestPositiveInt) { 
                smallestPositiveInt++;
             }    
        }

        return smallestPositiveInt;
    }
}
1
public static int solution(int[] A) {
    Arrays.sort(A);
    int minNumber = 1;
    int length = A.length - 1;
    int max = A[length];
    Set < Integer > set = new HashSet < > ();
    for (int i: A) {
        if (i > 0) {
            set.add(i);
        }
    }
    for (int j = 1; j <= max + 1; j++) {
        if (!set.contains(j)) {
            minNumber = j;
            break;
        }
    }
    return minNumber;
}
0

Late joining the conversation. Based on:

https://codereview.stackexchange.com/a/179091/184415

There is indeed an O(n) complexity solution to this problem even if duplicate ints are involved in the input:

solution(A)
Filter out non-positive values from A
For each int in filtered
    Let a zero-based index be the absolute value of the int - 1
    If the filtered range can be accessed by that index  and  filtered[index] is not negative
        Make the value in filtered[index] negative

For each index in filtered
    if filtered[index] is positive
        return the index + 1 (to one-based)

If none of the elements in filtered is positive
    return the length of filtered + 1 (to one-based)

So an array A = [1, 2, 3, 5, 6], would have the following transformations:

abs(A[0]) = 1, to_0idx = 0, A[0] = 1, make_negative(A[0]), A = [-1,  2,  3,  5,  6]
abs(A[1]) = 2, to_0idx = 1, A[1] = 2, make_negative(A[1]), A = [-1, -2,  3,  5,  6]
abs(A[2]) = 3, to_0idx = 2, A[2] = 3, make_negative(A[2]), A = [-1, -2, -3,  5,  6]
abs(A[3]) = 5, to_0idx = 4, A[4] = 6, make_negative(A[4]), A = [-1, -2, -3,  5, -6]
abs(A[4]) = 6, to_0idx = 5, A[5] is inaccessible,          A = [-1, -2, -3,  5, -6]

A linear search for the first positive value returns an index of 3. Converting back to a one-based index results in solution(A)=3+1=4

Here's an implementation of the suggested algorithm in C# (should be trivial to convert it over to Java lingo - cut me some slack common):

public int solution(int[] A)
{
    var positivesOnlySet = A
        .Where(x => x > 0)
        .ToArray();

    if (!positivesOnlySet.Any())
        return 1;

    var totalCount = positivesOnlySet.Length;
    for (var i = 0; i < totalCount; i++) //O(n) complexity
    {
        var abs = Math.Abs(positivesOnlySet[i]) - 1;
        if (abs < totalCount && positivesOnlySet[abs] > 0) //notice the greater than zero check 
            positivesOnlySet[abs] = -positivesOnlySet[abs];
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < totalCount; i++) //O(n) complexity
    {
        if (positivesOnlySet[i] > 0)
            return i + 1;
    }

    return totalCount + 1;
}
0

I think that using structures such as: sets or dicts to store unique values is not the better solution, because you end either looking for an element inside a loop which leads to O(N*N) complexity or using another loop to verify the missing value which leaves you with O(N) linear complexity but spending more time than just 1 loop.

Neither using a counter array structure is optimal regarding storage space because you end up allocating MaxValue blocks of memory even when your array only has one item.

So I think the best solution uses just one for-loop, avoiding structures and also implementing conditions to stop iteration when it is not needed anymore:

public int solution(int[] A) {
    // write your code in Java SE 8
    int len = A.length;
    int min=1;

    Arrays.sort(A);

    if(A[len-1]>0)
    for(int i=0; i<len; i++){
        if(A[i]>0){
            if(A[i]==min) min=min+1;
            if(A[i]>min) break;
        }
    }
    return min;
}

This way you will get complexity of O(N) or O(N * log(N)), so in the better case you are under O(N) complexity

0

Try this code it works for me

import java.util.*;
    class Solution {
        public static int solution(int[] A) {
            // write your code in Java SE 8
            int m = Arrays.stream(A).max().getAsInt(); //Storing maximum value 
            if (m < 1) // In case all values in our array are negative 
            { 
                return 1; 
            } 
            if (A.length == 1) { 

                //If it contains only one element 
                if (A[0] == 1) { 
                    return 2; 
                } else { 
                    return 1; 
                } 
            } 
            int min = A[0];
            int max= A[0];
            int sm = 1;

            HashSet<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();

            for(int i=0;i<A.length;i++){
                set.add(A[i]);

                if(A[i]<min){
                    min = A[i];
                }
                if(A[i]>max){
                    max = A[i];
                }
            }

            if(min <= 0){
                min = 1;
            }

            if(max <= 0){
                max = 1;
            }

            boolean fnd = false;
            for(int i=min;i<=max;i++){
                if(i>0 && !set.contains(i)){
                    sm = i;
                    fnd = true;
                    break;
                }
                else continue;

            }
            if(fnd)
                return sm; 
            else return max +1;
        }

              public static void main(String args[]){

               Scanner s=new Scanner(System.in);

            System.out.println("enter number of elements");

            int n=s.nextInt();

            int arr[]=new int[n];

            System.out.println("enter elements");

            for(int i=0;i<n;i++){//for reading array
                arr[i]=s.nextInt();

            }

        int array[] = arr;

        // Calling getMax() method for getting max value
        int max = solution(array);
        System.out.println("Maximum Value is: "+max);

      }
    }
  • This is practically a code-only answer. Please improve it with some explanation. Why and how does this help? – Yunnosch Feb 13 at 21:17
0

The simplest way using while loop:

fun solution(A: IntArray): Int {
    var value = 1
    var find = false
    while(value < A.size) {
        val iterator = A.iterator()
        while (iterator.hasNext()) {
            if (value == iterator.nextInt()) {
                find = true
                value++
            }
        }
        if (!find) {
            break
        } else {
            find = false
        }
    }
    return value
}
0

This is might help you, it should work fine!

public static int sol(int[] A)
{
    boolean flag =false;
    for(int i=1; i<=1000000;i++ ) {
        for(int j=0;j<A.length;j++) {
            if(A[j]==i) {
                flag = false;
                break;
            }else {
                flag = true;
            }
        }
        if(flag) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return 1;
}
  • This is practically a code-only answer. Please improve it with some explanation of how and why it helps. – Yunnosch Feb 13 at 21:17
0

Python implementation of the solution. Get the set of the array - This ensures we have unique elements only. Then keep checking until the value is not present in the set - Print the next value as output and return it.

def solution(A):
# write your code in Python 3.6
    a = set(A)
    i = 1
    while True:
        if i in A:
            i+=1
        else:
            return i
    return i
    pass
0

Simple way to get this done !!

public int  findNearestPositive(int array[])
{
    boolean isNegative=false;
    int number=0;
    int value=0;

    if(array[0]<=0 && array[array.length-1]<0)
    {
    return 1;


    }

    for(int i=0;i<array.length;i++)
    {
    value=i+1;
    isNegative=false;

    for(int j=0;j<array.length;j++)
    {
    if(value==array[j])
    {
    isNegative=true;

    }

    }

    if(isNegative!=true)
    {
    if(number==0){

    number=value;
    }else if(value<number){
    number=value;
    }

    }               

    }


    if(number==0)
    {

    number=value+1;
    }

    return number;

}
0

My solution having 100% result in codility with Swift 4.

func solution(_ A : [Int]) -> Int {
    let positive = A.filter { $0 > 0 }.sorted()
    var x = 1
    for val in positive{
        if(x < val) {
            return x
        }
        x = val + 1
    }
    return x
}
  • What is original in this answer? What purpose is special casing 1? Why let index assume values up to result.count - 1 just to exclude the upper bound with an extra if? – greybeard Aug 1 at 6:41
  • special casing 1 is for if that array doesn't contain 1 that means 1 is the result which is the smallest integer not available in array. And index is assumed upto result.count - 1 just because inner condition checks for index + 1 where it will get fail with index out of bound. So we have to check only upto last index. And if the for loop finish upto last index and we don't found the smallest integer then last return line will return the next integer after the last element. You can copy this solution to codility to check the output and result. – Tushar - iOS developer Aug 2 at 7:18
  • @greybeard If this solution helped you then give up vote plz. – Tushar - iOS developer Aug 2 at 10:26
  • This is uncommented code in a language the question is not tagged with. It contains code for a special case that does "not" change the result without giving a motivation (avoiding a superlinear processing step comes to mind). It uses an extra conditional statement to fix an inapt choice of loop limit. It uses four comparisons per iteration where one would suffice. Not only does this solution not help me: It annoys me. – greybeard Aug 3 at 5:33
  • (Was about to add blame for A : inout (why out?), but that has to go to codility.com.) – greybeard Aug 3 at 5:58

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