3
Table::Table(int n): maxGuests(n)
{
    int numGuests = 0;
}
int Table::maxOccupancy(void)
{
    return maxGuests;
}

int Table::currentOccupancy(void)
{
    return numGuests;
}

As in the above code, I'm getting an unused numGuests warning, even after returning it at the end of my accessor. Why would that be?

Thanks :)

  • 3
    You should quote --- verbatim --- the warning message the compiler give you and show the line it is reported to. – YSC Aug 7 '18 at 16:00
  • 9
    What do you think int numGuests = 0; does in your constructor? – NathanOliver- Reinstate Monica Aug 7 '18 at 16:01
  • 5
    Thankfully your compiler tells you this is a problem. – drescherjm Aug 7 '18 at 16:17
  • This warning is really an error. Its a good job the compiler found it and told you about otherwise your code would not work as expected. – Martin York Aug 7 '18 at 17:47
4

You create a local variable with the same name as a class member. Just remove int to get what you want:

Table::Table(int n): maxGuests(n)
{
    numGuests = 0;
}
  • 3
    Even better would be to move the initialization to the initialization list rather than the constructor body. – Jesper Juhl Aug 7 '18 at 16:13
  • @MananShah the @Walter 's answer is more detailed. You can initialize simple type right in declaration or if you don't want for any reasons, you can do it before constructor's body like this: Table::Table(int n): maxGuests(n), numGuests(0) { } – Lex Sergeev Aug 7 '18 at 16:13
  • @JesperJuhl What about the word before? Unfortunately I am not English native speaker, and sometimes I forget the terminology. So if the initialization list isn't located before the constructor's body, where is it located? – Lex Sergeev Aug 7 '18 at 16:34
  • @LexSergeev Just my opinion, on the topic, but what is wrong with the construct rather than? In this context, it means "instead of". And the position of initialization list, relative to the constructor body, isn't relevant, while the word before would make it seem that it is, while, simultaneously, not conveying the same information, as "rather than". Note: I am not a native English speaker as well. – Algirdas Preidžius Aug 7 '18 at 17:28
  • 1
    While this "fixes" the code in the question, it suggest poor style. Member variables should be initialized as early as possible, while here this is done late. – Walter Aug 7 '18 at 18:20
8

In the code

Table::Table(int n): maxGuests(n)
{
int numGuests = 0;
}

A local variable numGuests is defined, which is not the class property. And this is not used anywhere. Hence you are getting the warning. Remove int in the statement int numGuests = 0; should resolve this problem.

OR better you can update your code to include this property in the initializer list itself like:

Table::Table(int n) : maxGuests(n), numGuests(0)
{
}
7

The local variable numGuests in the snippet

Table::Table(int n): maxGuests(n)
{
    int numGuests = 0;
}

has not been used. Presumably you want instead

struct Table
{
    ...
    int numGuests = 0;      // default value
    const int maxGuests;
    Table(int n) : maxGuests(n) {}
};
4

You're creating a variable that "shadows" the property you're trying to assign. I'm not sure why you're using two completely different initialization methods here, but you can simplify the code and fix the bug like this:

Table::Table(int n) : maxGuests(n), numGuests(0)
{
}

Whenever practical, initialize your properties like that. Doing it in code is usually reserved for cases where it's not clear what value will be assigned, some computation is required, or you need to delegate to a function to do it.

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