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I have 2 data sets in Pandas Dataframe and I want to visualize them on the same scatter plot so I tried:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns

sns.pairplot(x_vars=['Std'], y_vars=['ATR'], data=set1, hue='Asset Subclass')
sns.pairplot(x_vars=['Std'], y_vars=['ATR'], data=set2, hue='Asset Subclass')
plt.show()

But all the time I get 2 separate charts instead of a single one enter image description here How can I visualize both data sets on the same plot? Also can I have the same legend for both data sets but different colors for the second data set?

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  • For the first question, can you concatenate the datasets?
    – Charlie G
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:05
  • @Charlie I can but then I have to make another column to distinct between data sets?
    – Michael Dz
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:11
  • Can you post the sample of set1 and set2?
    – harvpan
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:14
  • 1
    What version of seaborn are you using? '0.9.0' has a scatter plot function that may make this easier
    – johnchase
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:18
  • seems like a reasonable question - and happens to be useful to me. Oct 1, 2018 at 4:53

1 Answer 1

14

The following should work in the latest version of seaborn (0.9.0)

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns

First we concatenate the two datasets into one and assign a dataset column which will allow us to preserve the information as to which row is from which dataset.

concatenated = pd.concat([set1.assign(dataset='set1'), set2.assign(dataset='set2')])

Then we use the sns.scatterplot function from the latest seaborn version (0.9.0) and via the style keyword argument set it so that the markers are based on the dataset column:

sns.scatterplot(x='Std', y='ATR', data=concatenated,
                hue='Asset Subclass', style='dataset')
plt.show()
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  • Perfect! That's what I was looking for.
    – Michael Dz
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:33
  • 1
    This is not always required. You can easily plot different dataframes on same axis with different colors and style. @MichaelDz
    – harvpan
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:34
  • Glad it helped you out! @harvpan, not quite sure what you mean. Do you mean the pd.concat call is unnecessary and one could instead just write two calls to sns.scatterplot or plt.scatter?
    – tobsecret
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:48
  • Yes @tobsecret, that's what I meant. concatenating can be computationally sensitive and hog some large memory.
    – harvpan
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:54
  • Fair point, though if your dataset is large enough to get you into computationally sensitive plotting territory, then you would likely have to opt for something like datashader anyways due to overplotting concerns. In the example plot given in the question, the amount of points appear to be in the hundreds, so concatenation should not be a limiting factor.
    – tobsecret
    Aug 7, 2018 at 19:00

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