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I'm freaking out with Entity Framework. It should be easier and faster but it's just horrible.

I'm using database first approach with two very simple tables. The User table with Id and Username, primary key and autoincrement on Id, and the Permission table with permissionname and userid, primary key on both columns and a releation from userid to user.id.

This is my code to grant and revoke permissions:

   public bool ContributionMarginCustomer
    {
        get => GetPermission(_contributionmarginCustomer);
        set => SetPermission(value, _contributionmarginCustomer);
    }

The ContributionMarginCustomer property is bound to a checkbox.

private void SetPermission(bool permissionIsGranted, string key)
{
    var permissionStatus = permissionIsGranted ? PermissionStatus.Granted : PermissionStatus.Revoked;

    using (var entity = new KundeninfoEntities())
    {
        var user = entity.Users.Single(x => x.Id == _user.Id);
        var existingPermission = user.Permissions.SingleOrDefault(x => x.Name == key);

        switch (permissionStatus)
        {
            case PermissionStatus.Granted:
                if (existingPermission == null)
                {
                    user.Permissions.Add(new Permission { Name = key });
                    entity.SaveChanges();
                }
                break;

            case PermissionStatus.Revoked:
                if (existingPermission != null)
                {
                    entity.Permissions.Remove(existingPermission);
                    entity.SaveChanges();
                }
                break;
        }

        _permissions = entity.Permissions
                             .Where(x => x.UserId == _user.Id)
                             .ToList();
    }
}

Granting a permission works great.

Removing the permission with entity.Permission.Remove(existingPermission) removes it from every single user in the database.

I do not understand this behaviour. Do any of you?

Thanks

EDIT: Usertable

enter image description here

Permissiontable before:

enter image description here

Permissiontable after I remove it with userId 15 and key CONTRIBUTIONMARGINCUSTOMER

enter image description here

Edit 2: SOLUTION

I changed the permissiontable to have only one column as primary key. That means the new permissiontable has three columns: Id (autoincrement), Name and UserId with a unique key to name and userid.

The code above works now but I'm not really happy with this.

  • Could you please state what exactly you mean by "removes it from every single user in the database"? I interpret it as "the same permission is removed from all users" but that shouldn't be possible. Can you show us the content of both "tables" before and after a remove as an example? With at least two different permission types, please. – Sentry Aug 8 '18 at 7:36
  • i edited my post – Thomas Klammer Aug 8 '18 at 7:43
  • 1
    I'm trying to reproduce your original problem because it just makes me curious. Just give me a few minutes, okay? ;) – Sentry Aug 8 '18 at 8:02
  • You seem to be doing something else wrong. Actually, you never show us how you call SetPermission(). My guess is that you call it too often, i.e. on all users. I've implemented it and everything works as it should, removing a permission only removes it for this one user. Could you please show how you call SetPermissions()? – Sentry Aug 8 '18 at 8:11
  • I updated the post. SetPermission() is only called once. I debugged it. – Thomas Klammer Aug 8 '18 at 8:18
2

In your second case, you are not removing your permission from the user, but from the entity (which is basically your entire list of users). Change to

case PermissionStatus.Revoked:
                if (existingPermission != null)
                {
                    user.Permissions.Remove(existingPermission);
                    entity.SaveChanges();
                }
                break;
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Yea, had the same thought. But this happens: System.InvalidOperationException: 'The operation failed: The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, or the unrelated object must be deleted.' – Thomas Klammer Aug 8 '18 at 6:38
  • @ThomasKlammer That's probably because the relationship is removed that way, but the existingPermission entity is not. And since its primary key contains the user.id, this won't work. – Sentry Aug 8 '18 at 7:33
  • ok. but that answers is not correct in my opinion. If I remove a specific permission from a permissioncollection it should not remove multiple permissions. – Thomas Klammer Aug 8 '18 at 7:34
1

Set the permission's state to Removed.

var existingPermission = user.Permissions.SingleOrDefault(x => x.Name == key);
//your other code here.
entity.Entry(existingPermission).State = EntityState.Removed;
entity.SaveChanges();
| improve this answer | |
1

It seems to me that your database is not normalized enough. IMHO this makes your code more difficult and causes your problems when granting / denying permissions.

You have Users and Permissions. Every User has zero or more Permissions, every Permission has been granted to zero or more Users. A standard many-to-many relation.

Many-to-many in entity framework are designed as follows:

class User
{
    public int Id {get; set;}

    // every user has zero or more Permissions (many-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<Permission> Permissions {get; set;}

    ...
}
class Permission
{
    public int Id {get; set;}

    // every Permission is granted to zero or more Users (many-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<User> Users {get; set;}
    ...
}
class MyDbContext : DbContext
{
     public DbSet<User> Users {get; set;}
     public DbSet<Permission> Permissions {get; set;}
}

This is all that entity framework needs to know that you designed a many-to-many relation. It will create the Users and Permissions table and it will create the junction table that is needed for (group)joins that need to be done when you want to retrieve the "Permissions granted to a user" or the "Users who have certain Permissions".

However, you don't use this junction table in your code, you use the ICollection. Entity Framework is smart enough to understand that a (Group)join is needed with the junction table and will perform the proper joins

I'll create several extension functions for the DbContext:

static void GrantPermission(this MyDbContext dbContext, User user, int permissionId)
{
    // TODO: check input parameters
    var permissionToGrant = dbContext.Permissions
        .Where(permission => permission.Id == permissionId)
        .FirstOrDefault();
    // TODO: decide what to do if not found
    user.Permissions.Add(permissionToGrant);
    var userToChange = dbContext.Users
}
static void GrantPermission(this MyDbContext dbContext, Permission permission, int userId)
{
     // TODO: check input parameters
     var userToGrantPermission = dbContext.Users
         .Where(user => user.Id == userId)
         .FirstToDefault();
      // TODO: decide what to do if not found
      permission.Users.Add(userToGrantPermission);
}

If desired grant Permission by name:

static void GrantPermission(this MyDbContext dbContext, User user, string permissionName)
{
    // TODO: check input parameters
    var permissionToGrant = dbContext.Permissions
        .Where(permission => permission.Name == permissionName)
        .FirstOrDefault();
    // TODO: decide what to do if not found
    user.Permissions.Add(permissionToGrant);
    var userToChange = dbContext.Users
}

Deny Permission:

static void GrantPermission(this MyDbContext dbContext, User user, string permissionName)
{
    // TODO: check input parameters
    var permissionToDeny = dbContext.Permissions
        .Where(permission => permission.Name == permissionName)
        .FirstOrDefault();
    if (permissionToDeny != null)
    {
         user.Permissions.Remove(permissionToDeny);
    }
    // else: user does not have this Permission; do nothing
}

// TODO: if desired: add function with userId and permissionName

Usage:

using (var dbContext = new MyDbContext()
{
     int userId = ...
     string permissionName = ...
     dbContext.GrantPermission(userId, permissionName);
     dbContext.SaveChanges();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • that should work. but I don't want to store every available permission in the database. Only the code should know about them. – Thomas Klammer Aug 8 '18 at 8:21
  • Is that because you don't want other applications to read your permissions? Why not secure access to your database, so only those who know the password can access it? – Harald Coppoolse Aug 8 '18 at 12:21
1

I've tried my best to reproduce the problem but I just couldn't.

I strongly believe that the cause for the behavior you report is that SetPermission() is not called the way you think.

Here is my code and the output it produces. The only changes to the SetPermission() method are to make it static so I could keep my code short, but it shouldn't change the functionality.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;

namespace EFTest
{
   public class Program
   {
      static void Main( string[] args )
      {
         Database.SetInitializer( new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<EFTestContext>() );

         User userHans;
         User userFranz;

         var permissionA = "A";
         var permissionB = "B";

         using( var context = new EFTestContext() )
         {
            userHans = context.Users.Add( new User() { Name = "Hans" } );   // Id = 1
            userFranz = context.Users.Add( new User() { Name = "Franz" } ); // Id = 2
            context.SaveChanges();
         }

         SetPermission( userHans.Id, true, permissionA );
         SetPermission( userHans.Id, true, permissionB );
         SetPermission( userFranz.Id, true, permissionA );
         SetPermission( userFranz.Id, true, permissionB );
         ListAllPermissions();
         // 1: A
         // 1: B
         // 2: A
         // 2: B

         SetPermission( userFranz.Id, false, permissionA );    
         ListAllPermissions();
         // 1: A
         // 1: B
         // 2: B

         SetPermission( userHans.Id, false, permissionB );    
         ListAllPermissions();
         // 1: A
         // 2: B    
      }

      enum PermissionStatus
      {
         Granted,
         Revoked,
      }

      private static void ListAllPermissions()
      {
         using( var context = new EFTestContext() )
         {
            foreach( var permission in context.Permissions )
            {
               Console.WriteLine( $"{permission.UserId}: {permission.Name}" );
            }
         }
         Console.ReadLine();
      }

      private static IList<Permission> SetPermission( int userId, bool permissionIsGranted, string key )
      {
         var permissionStatus = permissionIsGranted ? PermissionStatus.Granted : PermissionStatus.Revoked;

         using( var entity = new EFTestContext() )
         {
            var user = entity.Users.Single( x => x.Id == userId );
            var existingPermission = user.Permissions.SingleOrDefault( x => x.Name == key );

            switch( permissionStatus )
            {
               case PermissionStatus.Granted:
                  if( existingPermission == null )
                  {
                     user.Permissions.Add( new Permission { Name = key } );
                     entity.SaveChanges();
                  }
                  break;

               case PermissionStatus.Revoked:
                  if( existingPermission != null )
                  {
                     entity.Permissions.Remove( existingPermission );
                     entity.SaveChanges();
                  }
                  break;
            }

            var permissions = entity.Permissions
                                    .Where( x => x.UserId == userId )
                                    .ToList();

            return permissions;
         }
      }
   }
}

My context for the sake of completeness:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema;
using System.Data.Entity;

namespace EFTest
{
   public class EFTestContext : DbContext
   {
      public virtual DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
      public virtual DbSet<Permission> Permissions { get; set; }

      protected override void OnModelCreating( DbModelBuilder modelBuilder )
      {
         base.OnModelCreating( modelBuilder );
      }
   }

   public class User
   {
      [Key]
      public int Id { get; set; }
      public string Name { get; set; }

      public virtual ICollection<Permission> Permissions { get; set; }
   }

   public class Permission
   {
      [Key, Column( Order = 1 )]
      public string Name { get; set; }
      [Key, Column( Order = 2 ), ForeignKey( nameof( User ) )]
      public int UserId { get; set; }

      public virtual User User { get; set; }
   }
}
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