5

I am trying to order an IQueryable of entities by date from a passed in Expression< Func< T, object>> and am getting the error: "Unable to cast the type 'System.Nullable`1' to type 'System.Object'. LINQ to Entities only supports casting Entity Data Model primitive types." The entity has a nullable datetime property on it on which I am trying to sort:

Example: (where e.Date is a nullable DateTime)

Expression<Func<T,object>> sorter = (e) => e.Date;
IOrderedQueryable<T> sortedData = data.OrderBy(sorter);

Thanks in advance!

5

I wrote a simple class for ordering entities based on a lambda expression at runtime.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Reflection;

namespace DataModeling
{
    public class QueryOrderer<TEntity>
        where TEntity : class
    {
        private LambdaExpression defaultSortExpression;
        private Dictionary<string, LambdaExpression> orderFieldLookup;

        public QueryOrderer()
        {
            orderFieldLookup = new Dictionary<string, LambdaExpression>();
        }

        public void AddOrderMapping<TProp>(string fieldName, Expression<Func<TEntity, TProp>> selector)
        {
            orderFieldLookup[fieldName] = selector;
        }

        public void SetDefaultSortExpression<TProp>(Expression<Func<TEntity, TProp>> selector)
        {
            defaultSortExpression = selector;
        }

        public IQueryable<TEntity> GetOrderedEntries(string field, bool isDescending, IQueryable<TEntity> entries)
        {
            return orderEntries(entries, field, isDescending);
        }

        private IQueryable<TEntity> orderEntries(IQueryable<TEntity> entries, string fieldName, bool isDescending)
        {
            dynamic lambda = getOrderByLambda(entries, fieldName);
            if (lambda == null)
            {
                return entries;
            }
            if (isDescending)
            {
                return Queryable.OrderByDescending(entries, lambda);
            }
            else
            {
                return Queryable.OrderBy(entries, lambda);
            }
        }

        private dynamic getOrderByLambda(IQueryable<TEntity> entries, string fieldName)
        {
            if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(fieldName) && orderFieldLookup.ContainsKey(fieldName))
            {
                return orderFieldLookup[fieldName];
            }
            else
            {
                return defaultSortExpression;
            }
        }
    }
}

You use this class by initially setting up all of the fields:

QueryOrderer<User> orderer = new QueryOrderer<User>();
orderer.SetDefaultSortExpression(u => u.FullName);
orderer.AddOrderMapping("UserId", u => u.UserId);
orderer.AddOrderMapping("Name", u => u.FullName);
orderer.AddOrderMapping("Email", u => u.Email);
orderer.AddOrderMapping("CreatedOn", u => u.CreatedOn);

...

var users = orderer.GetOrderedEntries("CreatedOn", isDescending: false, context.Users);

I nice feature of this code is that it handles look-up values perfectly. For instance, if you're trying to sort using the description rather than a key, you can use the outer context when building up the sort expression:

orderer.AddOrderMapping("UserType", 
    u => context.UserTypes
                .Where(t => t.UserTypeId == u.UserTypeId)
                .Select(t => t.Description)
                .FirstOrDefault());

Entity Framework is smart enough to just fold the sub-query right into the outer query.

3
  • I want to thank you for this bit of code. I was able to use it to figure out where I was going wrong with the sorting method for my generic repository. pastebin.com/M6xV9wHd
    – Kibner
    Apr 17 '15 at 17:53
  • Nice. I recently extended this to be ordered by multiple fields too. I prefer your implementation. Apr 17 '15 at 19:48
  • This works like a charm! I extended the class to work with any TKey (I needed an int vs string). Nov 16 '16 at 23:06
1

Two problem here: First you use object in your sorter, you should use DateTime. Secondly every element must have a place in the order so you have to define what should happen with elements where Date is null:

Expression<Func<T, DateTime>> sorter = (e) => e.Date ?? DateTime.MaxValue;
IOrderedQueryable<T> sortedData = data.OrderBy(sorter);
3
  • 2
    Would it be possible to keep it generic to be able to sort by DateTime at the same time as other datatypes (such as string)? I'm trying to keep it generic enough so that if my entity has a property like entity.name of type string, it can re-use the same code to do the sorting and not have to figure out the type of the sorter.
    – rgimmy
    Mar 3 '11 at 2:46
  • @rgimmy: Any news on this issue? I'm facing the same
    – chiccodoro
    May 29 '12 at 10:29
  • Its not generic solution.
    – Abhishek
    Aug 20 '17 at 9:01
0

Try to reconstruct expression body

private LambdaExpression CreateLambdaPropertyGetter(Expression<Func<TEntity, object>> expression)
    {
        Expression body;
        if (expression.Body is UnaryExpression && ((UnaryExpression)expression.Body).NodeType == ExpressionType.Convert)            
            body = ((UnaryExpression)expression.Body).Operand;            
        else
            body = expression.Body;
        var lambda = Expression.Lambda(body, expression.Parameters);

        return lambda;
    }
0

Try using Func delegate instead on Expression<Func>

Func<T,object> sorter = (e) => e.Date;
IOrderedEnumerable<T> sortedData = data.OrderBy(sorter);
1
  • This would work for IEnumerable, but not IQueryable Jul 23 '19 at 12:24

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