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In Excel, I have some macros that are part of a Worksheet module.

In the code, I want to make sure that the ranges referred to are part of that worksheet.

For example, in my Main Sheet worksheet module, say I have:

Sub test()
Dim rng as Range
Set rng = Range("A1")
End Sub

Of course, I want to explicitly give the worksheet the range is on. Typically, I'd do

Set rng = Worksheets("Main Sheet").Range("A1")

But I'm curious, since I have my code in a worksheet module, how can I refer to that worksheet? I was thinking something like ThisWorksheet but that's not a method in VBA (but ThisWorkbook is, which is why I thought to try it).

My only other thoughts are that since my macro is inside a worksheet module, the "unassigned" range variable implicitly refers to the Main Sheet and can not refer to any other worksheet's cells.

Do I understand that correctly, or is there some way to refer to the worksheet the code running is stored in?

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    Since your code resides within the code module for your sheet, you can use the keyword Me to refer to that worksheet -- Set rng = Me.Range("A1"). While not necessary, it does give you access to the IntelliSense. – Domenic Aug 8 '18 at 17:35
  • @Domenic - Aha! That seems like the answer, please feel free to create an answer and I can mark it. (I also assume you can not use Me in a workbook module? Or if you can, Me then refers to essentially ThisWorkbook?). WIthout Me, is my assumption correct in that there's an implicit reference to the worksheet with just Range()? Or could that still theoretically refer to another sheet if active? – BruceWayne Aug 8 '18 at 17:54
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    @BruceWayne - In the Workbook module Range() will refer to whatever sheet is active, so you will need to be explicit if you need to be. If you are using any of the Worksheet events in the Workbook module, then you can use the sh variable that is passed from the event parameters. – Scott Holtzman Aug 8 '18 at 18:06
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    Me refers to the current object, so if you're in the code-behind for ThisWorkbook, it refers to ThisWorkbook ;-) – Mathieu Guindon Aug 8 '18 at 18:20
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A worksheet module is a document module, which is class just like any other, except it inherits (yes, inherits, as in class inheritance!) members from the Worksheet interface, and being a document module the only way to create an instance of it is through the host application's object model (i.e. ThisWorkbook.Worksheets.Add is essentially a factory method).

Being a class module, the worksheet object for that module is an instance of, say, the Sheet1 class, which contains whatever members you put into it, plus every member inherited from the Worksheet interface... including a Range property.

So the reason why an unqualified Range call in a worksheet module refers to that sheet, is simply because of the VBA language's scoping rules - given this code:

foo = Range("B12").Value2
  1. If there's a local variable in that scope named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  2. If there's a member in that module named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  3. If there's a global variable in the current project named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  4. If there's a globally-scoped identifier in a referenced project or type library named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

Members of 'Sheet1' include a 'Range' property, which is a member of the 'Worksheet' class

You can disambiguate the Range call by qualifying it with the Me keyword, which returns a reference to the current object, in this case through the Sheet1 interface (still assuming you're in the code-behind of Sheet1):

foo = Me.Range("B12").Value2

That code will work against Sheet1 if you're in the code-behind of Sheet1, and against Sheet2 if you're in the code-behind of Sheet2, ...and will fail to compile in a standard module.


When you're in a standard module, an unqualified Range call obeys the exact same scoping rules:

  1. If there's a local variable in that scope named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  2. If there's a member in that module named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  3. If there's a global variable in the current project named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

  4. If there's a globally-scoped identifier in a referenced project or type library named Range, then that's what Range refers to.

(assuming no shadowing of the Range identifier is occurring in that module/project)

The globally-scoped identifier in this case can be found in the hidden Global module:

members of '_Global' include a 'Range' property

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    Whooooo!!! That's an awesome answer, thank so very much for your help and time taken to write it! – BruceWayne Aug 8 '18 at 18:26
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    This is one big reason why I dislike implicit references - they don't help in making wrong code look wrong. Consistently qualifying with Me for all member accesses will scream wrong when transposing that code into a standard module or in an incompatible class/document class and paves the way for easy refactoring. – this Aug 8 '18 at 22:42
  • (Oh, PS I use RubberDuck all the time, it's great! Thanks so much for your most excellent work on it!! :D) – BruceWayne Aug 13 '18 at 6:14
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    @BruceWayne oh, I just write the bugs - blame this, M.Doerner, Comintern, Vogel612, ThunderFrame and everyone else involved for the bits that do work ;-) (thanks!) – Mathieu Guindon Aug 13 '18 at 6:34
  • (don't mind me, having a rather bad time with this autocompletion feature ATM) – Mathieu Guindon Aug 13 '18 at 6:36

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