3

One of the best things about Optional is it saves all the boilerplate checking for null values in a long chain:

Optional.ofNullable(myService.getSomething())
    .map(secondService::fetch)
    .map(thirdService::fetchAgain)
    // And so forth...

At any point the Optional will jump onto the 'empty' track if map returns a null.

It would be great if something similar could be done for Strings instead of having to check them for String::isEmpty every time:

Optional.ofNullable(entity.getName())
    .filter(String::isEmpty)
    .map(Utils::performSomeOperation)
    .filter(String::isEmpty)
    .or(service::getMostCommonName)
    .filter(String::isEmpty)
    .orElse("Bob");

Something like this:

OptionalString.ofEmptyable(entity.getName())
    .map(Utils::performSomeOperation)
    .or(service::getMostCommonName)
    .orElse("Bob");

The key logic in Optional happens in ofNullable when it calls its check for value == null. Theoretically you could apply any sort of logic in there:

MagicalOptionalString(StringUtils::isNotBlank).ofEmptyable(entity.getName())
    .map(Utils::performSomeOperation)
    .or(service::getMostCommonName)
    .orElse("Bob");

However, Optional is final, preventing any straightforward way of extending this behaviour. So is there an existing, robust implementation of this out there already?

5
  • 1
    why does service::getMostCommonName et al return an empty string instead of an empty Optional<String> or null? Aug 9 '18 at 15:56
  • This is java, implementing your own Optional would not take much effort (value, presence flag), you could then inherit from it and customize it for strings
    – Vivick
    Aug 9 '18 at 15:58
  • 1
    This would be a lot of extra work for something so trivially easy to do with existing methods.
    – VGR
    Aug 9 '18 at 17:33
  • @WorldSEnder It would theoretically return an Optional<String>. It might be present but empty, i.e. "". Because it's not the job of service to decide how it should be filtered. But that's besides the point, it's a trivial example and the interfaces can be however you like.
    – Druckles
    Aug 9 '18 at 19:26
  • 1
    @Vivick Sure, that's why I'm asking. It seems like such a trivial and yet useful pattern, it feels like it should already be available. And implementing it myself means introducing maintenance, possible bugs etc. that would be preferably avoided.
    – Druckles
    Aug 9 '18 at 19:29
3

Trying out a few things to resolve what you were aiming at, and realizing that I would second the thought from VGR as implementing such a use case is a lot of extra work as compared to using the existing methods.

Yet, few details that I could add to after spending some time looking over the implementations -

As a utility, you could implement a static implementation which verifies for both null and isEmpty condition for a string input and returns Optional accordingly. The code could look something like -

private static Optional<String> ofEmptyable(String string) {
    return isNullOrEmpty(string) ? Optional.empty() : Optional.of(string);
}

private static boolean isNullOrEmpty(String target) {
    return target == null || target.isEmpty();
}

this could then replace the usage of the ofNullable which specifically checks for null(the primary purpose of Optional).


Since the expectations in your problem statement were to actually handle the cases per method(map/or/orElse) call as in the optional, one approach similar to OptionalInt could be to implement a custom OptionalString as -

public final class OptionalString {

    private static final OptionalString EMPTY = new OptionalString();

    private final boolean isPresent;
    private final String value;

    private OptionalString() {
        this.isPresent = false;
        this.value = "";
    }

    private static OptionalString empty() {
        return EMPTY;
    }

    private boolean isPresent() {
        return isPresent;
    }

    private OptionalString(String value) {
        this.isPresent = true;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static OptionalString of(String value) {
        return value == null || value.isEmpty() ? OptionalString.empty() : new OptionalString(value);
    }

    public OptionalString map(Function<? super String, ? extends String> mapper) {
        return !isPresent() ? OptionalString.empty() : OptionalString.of(mapper.apply(this.value));
    }

    public OptionalString or(Supplier<String> supplier) {
        return isPresent() ? this : OptionalString.of(supplier.get());
    }

    String orElse(String other) {
        return isPresent ? value : other;
    }

    public String getAsString() {
        return Optional.of(value).orElseThrow(() -> new NoSuchElementException("No value present"));
    }
}

which could be further implemented for your use case in the following manner -

String customImpl = OptionalString.of(entity.getName())
            .map(OptionalStringTest::trimWhiteSpaces) // OptionalStringTest is my test class name where 'trimWhiteSpaces' operation on String resides
            .or(service::getMostCommonName)
            .orElse("learning");
System.out.println(String.format("custom implementation - %s", customImpl));

where

private static String trimWhiteSpaces(String x) {
    return x.trim();
}

Note - Honestly, I couldn't find the rationale behind not having an OptionalString class upfront in the JDK (the reason why I am stating this is because I suspect there definitely must have been a thought behind it), I believe its just that the radius of my reach is much smaller and I would expect someone credible to add to the details here. IMHO, it seems more like almost all of what you desire is right there using the Optional<String> and which takes us back to the starting of the loop.

6
  • 1
    Please note, the code shared in the post lacks validations of attributes and assumes certain points, such that when you use such a utility you must rely on your implementation which could be similar but not exactly same as above. :)
    – Naman
    Aug 9 '18 at 19:35
  • 1
    The rationale behind not having an OptionalString class in the JDK might be that the JDK developers never felt a need to add such a class. I for myself never had a need for a method like isNullOrEmpty in the last 25 years and would consider treating empty strings and absent/null strings the same a big code smell. I know, the Apache foundation seems to think different, but that just means that those who think like them may continue to use their utility libraries.
    – Holger
    Aug 13 '18 at 15:03
  • By the way, I don't understand why you sometimes use return condition? a: b; and other times if(condition) { return a; } else { return b; }. That looks inconsistent.
    – Holger
    Aug 13 '18 at 15:05
  • @Holger Thanks for the feedback. Made it consistent. (Mostly, was what it looks like in the JDK OptionalInt class.). And I do second the thought, that need to add such a class. is not as much, as the current utilities provide almost what is required for us as well. Just came up with the implementation for(and if) people could justify its usage in their application code.
    – Naman
    Aug 13 '18 at 15:58
  • @Holger perhaps it depends on application. I find uses for this everywhere, hence the question. Perhaps it makes more sense if you think of it the other way round: an Optional provides a guarantee that the value you have returned is not null (or else it is not present). An OptionalString or similar would provide a guarantee that the returned value is both not null and not empty.
    – Druckles
    Aug 14 '18 at 22:06
0

For anyone working in Kotlin, this is really easy to do:

class NonEmptyString private constructor(val Email: String) {
    companion object Factory {
        operator fun invoke(value: String?): T? = value?.let { if (it.isNotEmpty()) NonEmptyString(value) else null }
    }
}

The "static" invoke function conditionally creates a new object depending on whether it's valid or not. And allows you to call it like a constructor (NonEmptyString(value)). The private constructor forces you to use the invoke method.

Because this returns a null if it's not valid, and Kotlin has null-safety built in, it can be really easy to chain. Adding map or flatMap functions is then pretty straight-forward.

See this Code Review question for a more comprehensive, generalisable example I wrote.

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