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I'm new to Granger Causality and would appreciate any advice on understanding/interpreting the results of the python statsmodels output. I've constructed two data sets (sine functions shifted in time with noise added)enter image description here

and put them in a "data" matrix with signal 1 as the first column and signal 2 as the second. I then ran the tests using:

granger_test_result = sm.tsa.stattools.grangercausalitytests(data, maxlag=40, verbose=True)`

The results showed that the optimal lag (in terms of the highest F test value) were for a lag of 1.

Granger Causality
('number of lags (no zero)', 1)
ssr based F test:         F=96.6366 , p=0.0000  , df_denom=995, df_num=1
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=96.9280 , p=0.0000  , df=1
likelihood ratio test: chi2=92.5052 , p=0.0000  , df=1
parameter F test:         F=96.6366 , p=0.0000  , df_denom=995, df_num=1

However, the lag that seems to best describe the optimal overlap of the data is around 25 (in the figure below, signal 1 has been shifted to the right by 25 points): enter image description here

Granger Causality
('number of lags (no zero)', 25)
ssr based F test:         F=4.1891  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=923, df_num=25
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=110.5149, p=0.0000  , df=25
likelihood ratio test: chi2=104.6823, p=0.0000  , df=25
parameter F test:         F=4.1891  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=923, df_num=25

I'm clearly misinterpreting something here. Why wouldn't the predicted lag match up with the shift in the data?

Also, can anyone explain to me why the p-values are so small as to be negligible for most lag values? They only begin to show up as non-zero for lags greater than 30.

Thanks for any help you can give.

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  • Could you find an answer to this?
    – Brandon
    May 22 '19 at 14:17
6

As stated here, in order to run a Granger Causality test, the time series' you are using must be stationary. A common way to achieve this is to transform both series by taking the first difference of each:

x = np.diff(x)[1:]
y = np.diff(y)[1:]

Here is the comparison of Granger Causality results at lag 1 and lag 25 for the similar dataset I generated:

Unchanged

Granger Causality
number of lags (no zero) 1
ssr based F test:         F=19.8998 , p=0.0000  , df_denom=221, df_num=1
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=20.1700 , p=0.0000  , df=1
likelihood ratio test: chi2=19.3129 , p=0.0000  , df=1
parameter F test:         F=19.8998 , p=0.0000  , df_denom=221, df_num=1

Granger Causality
number of lags (no zero) 25
ssr based F test:         F=6.9970  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=149, df_num=25
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=234.7975, p=0.0000  , df=25
likelihood ratio test: chi2=155.3126, p=0.0000  , df=25
parameter F test:         F=6.9970  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=149, df_num=25

1st Difference

Granger Causality
number of lags (no zero) 1
ssr based F test:         F=0.1279  , p=0.7210  , df_denom=219, df_num=1
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=0.1297  , p=0.7188  , df=1
likelihood ratio test: chi2=0.1296  , p=0.7188  , df=1
parameter F test:         F=0.1279  , p=0.7210  , df_denom=219, df_num=1

Granger Causality
number of lags (no zero) 25
ssr based F test:         F=6.2471  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=147, df_num=25
ssr based chi2 test:   chi2=210.3621, p=0.0000  , df=25
likelihood ratio test: chi2=143.3297, p=0.0000  , df=25
parameter F test:         F=6.2471  , p=0.0000  , df_denom=147, df_num=25

I'll try to explain what is happening conceptually. Due to the series you are using having a clear trend in mean, the early lags at 1, 2, ... etc. all give significant predictive models in the F test. This is because you can negatively correlate the x values 1 lag a way with the y values very easily, due to the long term trend. Additionally (this one is more of an educated guess), I think the reason you see the F statistic for lag 25 very low compared to the early lags is that a lot of the variance explained by the x series is contained in the auto-correlation of y from lags 1-25, since the non-stationarity gives the auto correlation more predictive power.

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  • Hi @rsmith49, from what I read and see above the timeseries in question are sine waves with some noise added, how would these be non-stationary?
    – rbonallo
    Feb 24 at 10:02
  • Honestly this sent me down a bit of a rabbit hole, since my experience with time series was one grad class and then a bit of investigation for work. But looks like from here that Strict Sense Stationarity would exclude a sine wave plus noise. I'm assuming, based on the results from my experiment, that Granger Causality tests require Strict Sense Stationarity
    – rsmith49
    Mar 5 at 20:05
3

From the notes of the statsmodels.tsa.stattools.grangercausalitytests function

The Null hypothesis for grangercausalitytests is that the time series in the second column, x2, does NOT Granger cause the time series in the first column, x1. Grange causality means that past values of x2 have a statistically significant effect on the current value of x1, taking past values of x1 into account as regressors. We reject the null hypothesis that x2 does not Granger cause x1 if the pvalues are below a desired size of the test.

The null hypothesis for all four test is that the coefficients corresponding to past values of the second time series are zero.

the test is working exactly as expected.

Let's fix a significance level for your test, say alpha = 5% or 1%. It is important to choose it before performing the test. Then you run your Granger (non-)causality test, whose null hypothesis is that the second time series doesn't cause the first one, in the sense of Granger, for a fixed lag. As you found, the pvalue for lag = 1 is higher than the threshold alpha that you fixed, meaning that you can reject the null hypothesis (i.e. no causation). For lag > 25 the pvalues drop to zero, meaning that you should reject the null hypothesis, that is non-causation.

This is indeed in agreement with what you provided as time series by construction.

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