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I'm trying to write unit tests for ModelState validation for an Asp.Net Core Web API.

I read that, the best way to do so is to use TryValidateModel function. But, every time I run the unit test, it throws NullReference exception.
I found many articles suggesting controller.ModelState.AddModelError("",""), but I'm not interested in this, as I believe that it beats the actual purpose of the real model validation.

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1()
{
    var controller = new TestController();

    controller.Post(new Model());
}


public class TestController : Controller
{
    public IActionResult Post(Model model)
    {
        bool b = TryValidateModel(model)

        return Ok();
    }
}

TryValidateModel(model) always throws NullReference Exception from TryValidateModel(model, prefix) function.

Appreciate any help.

  • 1
    Shouldn't controller.TestModel(new Model()); be controller.Post(new Model()); – Marcus Höglund Aug 9 '18 at 18:10
  • 2
    I don't know where you read the non-sense of TryValidateModel being best practice, but thats definitely not true. First, all the official tutorials used (or still use) ModelState.IsValid. Second, with ASP.NET Core 2.1 a new [ApiController] attribute has been added, which reduces the number of things one has to do in WebApi-esque controllers. Among them, is that models implicitly validated, so that ModelState.IsValid within the controller action isn't necessary and the validation action filter returns the appropriate "problem details" (also 2.1 feature) – Tseng Aug 9 '18 at 20:02
  • Read ASP.NET Core 2.1.0-preview1: Improvements for building Web APIs to learn more details about it – Tseng Aug 9 '18 at 20:02
  • I updated the code to fix the wrong function call . Thanks Marcus for the tip. – Alen Alex Aug 10 '18 at 4:35
  • @Tseng This works fine with ModelState.IsValid when I deploy the application. The concern is when I unit test, ModelState.IsValid always returns true. It does not actually perform the model validations, which is where TryValidateModel(model) comes in, which is expected to forcefully validate. But, it is throwing Null Reference Exception for me. – Alen Alex Aug 10 '18 at 4:43
5
0

It's configuration/integration issue.

You can see some additional info in the issue in ASP.NET Core repo and another one on github. But I can tell you the easiest fix (I used it once)

        var objectValidator = new Mock<IObjectModelValidator>();
        objectValidator.Setup(o => o.Validate(It.IsAny<ActionContext>(), 
                                          It.IsAny<ValidationStateDictionary>(), 
                                          It.IsAny<string>(), 
                                          It.IsAny<Object>()));
        controller.ObjectValidator = objectValidator.Object;
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I'm not sure that's what the OP is asking for, as it effectively always passes. If I get the op right he wants to test the validation itself – Tseng Aug 9 '18 at 19:57
  • Yes, this is basically mocking the validation which will always be true. The OP wasn't asking for this, see his answer below. – Akos Aug 16 '19 at 7:57
2
0

As I figured how to fix Null Reference Exception thanks to @Egorikas, I noticed that it still doesn't actually validate the model and always returns a true.

I found that we could just use Validator class in System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotationsnamespace.

[TestMethod]
public void TestMethod1()
{
    var model = new Person();
    var validationResultList = new List<ValidationResult>();


    bool b1 = Validator.TryValidateObject(model, new ValidationContext(model), validationResultList);
}

You can directly validate it from the Test method itself, rather than having to call the controller, if ModelState validation is your intention.

Hope this helps.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This doesn't work for me. It will still return true :( – President Camacho Aug 5 '19 at 8:49
  • @PresidentCamacho I got it to work for me for anything that would cause my API to return a 400. Could you give a little more information like what sort of properties are decorated with what sort of validation attributes? – Micteu Aug 15 '19 at 16:26
  • One important note here, that the validation is not recursive, meaning only the top level is validated this way. Let's say there is a complex type Address in Person and you want to validate that this way, you need another line like: bool b2 = Validator.TryValidateObject(model.Address, new ValidationContext(model.Address), validationResultList); – Akos Aug 16 '19 at 8:07
  • @Akos yes I noticed that :) – President Camacho Aug 16 '19 at 8:32

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