Currently I have a List string ids which holds a bunch of ids, a List object that starts empty and fills with objects, and a function returns an object getObject(string id) that gets the object given the id string. Is there a way to thread this easily instead of having to do it serially using the Threading class? It doesn't seem like there's a way for threads to return objects since they use void functions.

  • Use Task instead of Thread. – PetSerAl Aug 9 at 18:44
  • @PetSerAl: Why? – Stefan Aug 9 at 18:52
  • The old fashioned way (pre-Task/Async): Author a class that contains the state you want to manage. Make one of the public methods of the class be your "thread function" (the right call signature, etc.). Create an instance of the class, initialize the state to whatever you want as an initial state. Dispatch a delegate representing `myInstance.ThreadFunc' to the thread pool. When the thread completes, look at the state of the object. – Flydog57 Aug 9 at 19:22
  • @Stefan Why not? Task provide convenient abstraction whenever you use separate Thread or ThreadPool. And you can plug-in custom TaskScheduler, if you have special needs. And it solves result/exception passing back to task creator, exactly what OP ask. As well it provide many useful features, like continuation, etc. Unless you pursue raw performance, I do not see compelling reason not to use Task, if it available to you. – PetSerAl Aug 9 at 19:22

Assuming getObject(string id) method is thread safe and is CPU intensive (i.e. it doesn't perform I/O operations), then PLINQ is probably best option. It does automatically all the magic of partitioning input list, distributing workload to all available CPU cores and then merging sub-results back to one resulting list.

List<string> ids = new List<string>(new[] { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f" });

List<Object> objects = ids
    .AsParallel()
    .Select(id => getObject(id))
    .ToList();

If needed, you can also configure it with .WithDegreeOfParallelism(), .WithExecutionMode() and .WithMergeOptions() extensions methods (but usually it works well with default options).

But if getObject() method is I/O bound, then using Task will be probably better choice.

I'm showing two ways to do this, one the "Old-fashioned" way, one with a Task. Both of them are in a simple demo WinForms app (just because...)

Here is the old-fashioned way (submitting work explicitly to the thread pool). For this, I created a simple little class:

public class OldFashionedThread
{
    private readonly List<string> _listOfStrings = new List<string>();

    public IEnumerable<string> ListOfStrings => _listOfStrings;
    public Form1 TheForm { get; set; }

    public void DoWork(object state)
    {
        var strings = new[] {"Some", "strings", "go", "here"};
        foreach (var s in strings)
        {
            _listOfStrings.Add(s);
            Thread.Sleep(500);
        }
        TheForm?.Invoke(new Action(TheForm.AlertAllDone));
    }
}

The "AlertAllDone" just pops up a message box saying "all done"

Then, on my main form, I have:

   private OldFashionedThread _worker;
   private void StartThreadBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
       _worker = new OldFashionedThread {TheForm = this};
       ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(_worker.DoWork);
   }

   private void AllDoneBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
       if (_worker != null)
       {
           var result = string.Join(" ", _worker.ListOfStrings);
           MessageBox.Show(result);
       }
   }

I click the StartThreadBtn button, wait till the All Done message box happens and then click the AllDoneBtn button.

Using a task, I can do this (directly in the form's code):

   private async void AsTaskBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
       var strings = await GetStringsAsync();
       var result = string.Join(" ", strings);
       MessageBox.Show(result);
   }

   private async Task<IEnumerable<string>> GetStringsAsync()
   {
       return await Task.Run<IEnumerable<string>>(
           () => {
               var listOfStrings = new List<string>();
               var strings = new[] { "Some", "strings", "go", "here" };
               foreach (var s in strings)
               {
                   listOfStrings.Add(s);
                   Thread.Sleep(500);
               }
               return listOfStrings;
           });
   }

The await lets me just wait till the work is finished (without tying up the UI thread) and then, when it's finished, I wake up and pop up the message box.

Use:

var task = Task.Run<object>(() => /** your delegate returning an object **/)

You can then handle it using Result, Wait, or (the best, preferred wait) the await keyword.

var returnedObject = await task;

More on Tasks here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.tasks.task(v=vs.110).aspx

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