Is this the correct essence of unit testing? I think i don't understand what should I test. ConverterContext is a strategy class

@SpringBootTest
@ExtendWith(SpringExtension.class)
class ConverterContextTest {

    @Autowired
    private final ConverterContext converterContext;
    @Autowired
    private final ConverterRegisterUserDto created;

    @Autowired
    ConverterContextTest(ConverterContext converterContext, ConverterRegisterUserDto created) {
        this.converterContext = converterContext;
        this.created = created;
    }

    @Test
    void converterContextGivesCorrectConverter(){
        ConverterRegisterUserDto returned = converterContext.getConverter(ConverterRegisterUserDto.class);
        assertEquals(returned, created);
    }

    @Test
    void converterContextGivesIncorrectConverter(){
        ConverterShowUserDto returned = converterContext.getConverter(ConverterShowUserDto.class);
        assertNotEquals(returned, created);
    }
}
  • What are you testing? – lealceldeiro Aug 9 at 20:08
  • I am testing whether Converter Context returns the correct object – mmprogr Aug 9 at 20:11
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In a unit test, you want to avoid loading a spring boot context. So instantiate yourself ConverterContext.
If ConverterContext has some dependencies that you need to isolate, you can mock them (see the Mockito library).
Besides you should not need either to autowire the expected.
It will make your test faster to execute and simpler to read.
Note that in your code ConverterContext appears as a factory and not a strategy.

About the logic of your test, I think that the second test is not required.
What you want to check is that the factory returns what it is designed to return.
Asserting that the actual is not equal to a dumb expected is perfectly useless . It is like dead code that you have to main...
In fact, it is like if you asserted that add(1,1) == 2 in the first test and that in the second test you asserted that add(2,1) != 2.
Why not assert that all dumb expected are not equal ? add(2,1) != 4, add(2,1) != 5, add(2,1) != 6, and we can go on a very long time....

I would expect a unit test that looks like (I used JUnit 5 way to illustrate) :

import org.mockito.junit.jupiter.MockitoExtension;
import org.mockito.Mock;
import org.junit.jupiter.api.extension.ExtendWith;

@ExtendWith(MockitoExtension.class)
class ConverterContextTest {

    ConverterContext converterContext;  

    @Mock
    FooDep fooDep;

    @Mock
    BarDep barDep;

    @BeforeEach // or @Before in JUnit 4
    void init{
        converterContext = new ConverterContext(fooDep, barDep);
    }

    @Test
    void converterContextGivesCorrectConverter(){
        // mock which is required
        /...
        assertEquals(new ConverterRegisterUserDto(), converterContext.getConverter(ConverterRegisterUserDto.class));
        // mock which is required
        /...
        assertEquals(new ConverterShowUserDto(), converterContext.getConverter(ConverterShowUserDto.class));
    }
}
  • 1
    TLDR; upvote for first sentence. – Antoniossss Aug 9 at 21:04
  • @Antoniossss Many people forget that loading a Spring container is not free. – davidxxx Aug 9 at 21:07
  • It looks fine but what to do when Converters have many args in constructor (dependencies) ? If it is ModelMapper or PasswordEncoder i could easly create instances but if it would be other Service i could have a problem. So this code that you have written here is unit test, integration test or something more? – mmprogr Aug 9 at 22:34
  • You should mock dependencies that create difficulties or undesirable coupling in your test. I updated to illustrate. This is an unit test. – davidxxx Aug 10 at 6:22

With unit testing the idea is to test the smallest possible piece of code. In most cases this means a class and what its methods do. As for how many tests to write, that really depends on the person. To give an example:

public class Point2D
{
    private int x, y;
    public Point2D() {this.x = 0; this,y = 0;}

    public int getX() {return x;}
    public int getY() {return y;}
}

class Point2DTest 
{  
    @Autowired
    private final Point2D p;

    @Test
    void getXReturnsZero()
    {
        int expected = 0;
        assertEquals(expected, p.getX());
    }

    @Test
    void getYReturnsZero()
    {
        int expected = 0;
        assertEquals(expected, p.getY());
    }

    @Test
    void getXDoesNotReturnZero()
    {
        int expected = 1;
        assertNotEquals(expected, p.getX());
    }

    @Test
    void getYDoesNotReturnZero()
    {
        int expected = 1;
        assertNotEquals(expected, p.getY());
    }

}

This test could have been left with the first two methods, but for more test coverage a person may test more. I think its important to note that exhaustive testing (testing every possible outcome) is impossible in real life scenarios and generally a cut off point will be defined.

I tend to think of it as more of an integration test when you're loading a Spring context and more of a unit test when you don't and you're testing a specific logic of a small method without any context. When you're trying to test a class that only realistically depends on other injected beans in a Spring context you can use a framework like Mockito in order to keep them unit tests and prevent them from becoming full blown integration tests. I hope that's helpful.

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