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I'm refactoring a codebase with a large number of long header files (for ease of use, and to simplify compilation, the headers contain both the interface and the implementation).

The codebase avoids polymorphism like wildfire, and hence it resolves an internal storage type using macros like so:

#if defined USE_NIBBLE_CODES
#include "nibble.h"
#elif defined USE_BUTECODES 
#include "byte.h"
....
#endif

My question is, assuming that the aforementioned implementation header files have a large amount of lines in common, would it be preferable to merge them into one, and use the macros to separate the differences between implementations.

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    Using header-only implementations doesn't "simplify compilation" - it potentially makes it much more complex and take much longer than using separate headers and static or dynamic libraries. Also, it sounds like you should be using templates to implement the internal storage type. – Neil Butterworth Aug 9 '18 at 21:00
  • @NeilButterworth, I didn't write the library, and in fact it's probably the worst piece of code I had to deal with, hence why I'm refactoring. And by ease of use, I mean that the end user won't have to untagle the web of dependencies at compilation. You simply include a master header that includes everything it needs. It's caused by bad design, which I will need to eventually address, but that's completely irrelevant to the question. – Alex Petrosyan Aug 9 '18 at 21:17
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implementation header files have a large amount of lines in common, would it be preferable to merge them into one, and use the macros to separate the differences between implementations.

Yes... factoring common code makes it much easier to ensure bug fixes and improvements are applied properly to both.

That said, there are other ways to support a compile time choice of behaviours that may be better than using conditional compilation everywhere, such as using it once to select between two "policy" classes with support code for each of the behaviours.

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