In my current project my manager is forcing some design concept for dependency injection I would like to discuss because I’m curious what a specialists of dependency injection think about this approach. The ideas behind this is use of class called catalog that is implemented per each service (service in Service Fabric) and having all dependencies inside like this:

public interface IDepA
{
}

public interface IDepB
{
}

public interface IDepC
{
}

public class StandardConstructorInjectorService
{
    private readonly IDepA _depA;
    private readonly IDepB _depB;
    private readonly IDepC _depC;

    public StandardConstructorInjectorService(IDepA depA, IDepB depB, IDepC depC)
    {
        _depA = depA;
        _depB = depB;
        _depC = depC;
    }
}

public class ServiceCatalog
{
    private readonly Container _container;

    public ServiceCatalog(Container container)
    {
        _container = container;
    }

    public IDepA DepA => _container.GetInstance<IDepA>();
    public IDepB DepB => _container.GetInstance<IDepB>();
    public IDepC DepC => _container.GetInstance<IDepC>();
}

public class ServiceWithCatalog
{
    private readonly ServiceCatalog _catalog;

    public ServiceWithCatalog(ServiceCatalog catalog)
    {
        _catalog = catalog;
    }
}

From my perspective we have

Pros:

  1. Code that is using catalog is simple
  2. Dependencies can be used in Lazy mode so when code logic is not using them they will not be created – but on other hand I know that we should design classes in such way that they will use all dependencies
  3. It is easy bootstrap those classes because they have one predefined catalog

Cons:

  1. Dependencies to class is not directly visible
  2. Smell for service locator but we use resolve only in catalog definition and not in business code so I’m not sure is this acceptable or maybe dependency injection police will hunt us down :)

What do you think about this approach?

  • 1
    Dear closers, this question is not primarily opinion-based. – Steven Aug 9 at 21:18
  • 1
    @Steven That's your opinon. – itsme86 Aug 9 at 21:21
  • 4
    @itsme86: not really. The shown code demonstrates a few well-known and well-documented anti-patterns. Because of this, the question can be answered in a reasonably un-opionated way. – Steven Aug 9 at 21:25
  • @Steven That you think that the code shown is an anti-pattern is your opinion. That you (or others) have documented that opinion doesn't make it any less of an opinion. – Servy Aug 9 at 21:27
  • 1
    Well, that's not a pure service locator, but really close and... imho worse. It's like a god-objectfactory.. The 'catalog' almost forces all points of use to learn all dependencies of all siblings. Your saved only because C# compiler works somewhat hard to strip them, however the catalog still dependencies on all of them, what is not true for a normalna ioc container – quetzalcoatl Aug 9 at 21:32

Your ServiceCatalog class depends on the Container. This effectively makes this a Service Locator, which is an anti-pattern. The fact this this class is not 'business code' is irrelevant. The only thing that matters is that it is not part of the Composition Root, which makes this an anti-pattern.

Besides using an anti-pattern, the class exposes its dependencies, rather than hiding them, which is a bad idea as well. The main idea of this class is probably to group commonly used dependencies together, lowering the number of constructor dependencies a class has. Problem with this, however, is that it doesn't lower the complexity of a consuming class, but simply obscures the fact that a class has too many dependencies. A class with too many dependencies likely violates the Single Responsibility Principle.

Instead of using this service catalog 'pattern', stick to using Constructor Injection. When a class gets too many constructor dependencies, a code-smell called Constructor Over-Injection, action should be taken. There are many solutions for this, such as Facade Services, Decorators or Domain Events. A Facade Service hides its dependencies rather than exposing them.

All this information, and much more, can be read in this book, by Mark Seemann and myself.

  • 1
    I have book for two days now and I tend to read it ;) – dnf Aug 9 at 21:35
  • 1
    @quetzalcoatl thanks for noticing. Fixed it. – Steven Aug 10 at 21:20

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.