I was able to get the following code from some class work I'm working on. It works really well for what I need it for and I like that I can call startTime(); to start it. However, I'm now at a point where I need to figure out how to stop it. Is there a way to do startTime(stop); or something similar?

function startTime() {
    let hours = 0;
    let minutes = 0;
    let seconds = 0;
    const timer = setInterval(function () {
        seconds++;
        if (seconds === 60) {
            minutes++;
            seconds = 0;
        }
        second.innerHTML = formatTime();
    }, 1000);
    function formatTime() {
        let sec = seconds > 9 ? String(seconds) : '0' + String(seconds);
        let min = seconds > 9 ? String(minutes) : '0' + String(minutes);
        return min + ':' + sec;
    }
}
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to scope the variable that the setInterval is assigned to outside of startTime, so that it can be accessed and have clearInterval called on it externally. For example, this snippet will assign an interval to the timer, and then clear the interval after 5 seconds:

let timer;
function startTime() {
    let hours = 0;
    let minutes = 0;
    let seconds = 0;
    timer = setInterval(function () {
        seconds++;
        if (seconds === 60) {
            minutes++;
            seconds = 0;
        }
        second.innerHTML = formatTime();
    }, 1000);
    function formatTime() {
        let sec = seconds > 9 ? String(seconds) : '0' + String(seconds);
        let min = seconds > 9 ? String(minutes) : '0' + String(minutes);
        return min + ':' + sec;
    }
}
function stopTime() {
  clearInterval(timer);
}
startTime();
setTimeout(stopTime, 5000);
<div id="second"></div>

  • That makes sense, I'll play around with it. Thank you! – ab3d_work Aug 10 at 0:40

Personally, I'd prefer using a class to keep track of setInterval's return value.

class Timer {
  constructor(callback) {
    this.minutes = 0
    this.seconds = 0

    this.timer = null
    this.callback = callback
  }

  start() {
    // Make sure the timer isn't already running!
    if (this.timer !== null) {
      return
    }

    // Execute the callback every second, passing in
    // the new number of minutes and seconds
    this.timer = setInterval(() => {
      this.seconds++
      if (this.seconds === 60) {
        this.minutes++
        this.seconds = 0
      }
      this.callback(this.minutes, this.seconds)
    }, 1000)
  }

  stop() {
    clearInterval(timer)
    this.timer = null
  }
}

const timer = new Timer((minutes, seconds)) => {
  const sec = seconds > 9 ? String(seconds) : '0' + String(seconds)
  const min = seconds > 9 ? String(minutes) : '0' + String(minutes)
  const formatted = min + ':' + sec

  second.innerHTML = formatted
})

timer.start() // start the timer
timer.stop()  // stop the timer

I would just return the timer from the function to the caller. Then the caller can use it however it wants:

function startTime() {
    let hours = 0;
    let minutes = 0;
    let seconds = 0;
    function formatTime() {
        let sec = seconds > 9 ? String(seconds) : '0' + String(seconds);
        let min = seconds > 9 ? String(minutes) : '0' + String(minutes);
        return min + ':' + sec;
    }
    
    // return this value to the caller so they can stop it
    return setInterval(function () {
        seconds++;
        if (seconds === 60) {
            minutes++;
            seconds = 0;
        }
        console.log(formatTime());
    }, 1000);
    
}
// receives the result of setTimout
let timerControl = startTime()

// stop it after a few seconds
setTimeout(()=> {
  clearTimeout(timerControl)
  console.log("Stopped")
 }, 4000)

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