0

Suppose I have these classes:

private class Model
{
    public DateTime FirstDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime SecondDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime FinalDate { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
private class Mommasan : Bandana
{
    public DateTime RestDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime TurboDate { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

All dates need to be filtered up to 3 days. So how can I create a generic filtering method for the DateTime properties? Using IQueryable? I was hoping it would end up something like this:

(Obviously will not compile, but I'm guessing the idea)

void DoSpecificFilter<T>(ref IQueryable<T> query, DateTimeProperty property)
{
    DateTime today = today;
    query = query.Where(a => property <= today && today <= property.AddDays(3);
}

So if I need to filter Models who are on their final date, something like:

DoSpecificFilter<Model>(ref alreadyFilteredQuery, a => a.FinalDate);

and Mommasans who are on rest:

DoSpecificFilter<Mommasan>(ref alreadyFilteredQuery, a => a.RestDate);

Is this kind of thing possible at all or am I having the entirely wrong idea? Thanks!

0

Why not write an extension method on DateTime, and not look at the class at all? Something like ...

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IQueryable<T> DoSpecificFilter<T>(this DateTime value, IQueryable<T> query)
    {
        DateTime today = DateTime.Now;
        IQueryable<T> ret = query.Where(a => value <= today && today <= value.AddDays(3));
        return ret;
    }
}
2
  • I don't see why it wouldn't .. give it a bash?
    – WynDiesel
    Aug 10 '18 at 9:39
  • I think it wouldn't, because I don't see any pointers to the property being filtered...
    – AwonDanag
    Aug 10 '18 at 9:44
0

You could work with DateTime-Selectors. For multiple DateTime fields you would have to chain them together. It would probably be easier to write an extention method for this:

public static class ExtentionMethods
{
    public static IQueryable<T> DoSpecificFilter<T>(
        this IQueryable<T> query, 
        Expression<Func<T, DateTime>> dateSelector, 
        DateTime filterValue, 
        bool blnTopLimit)
    {
        return query.Where(a => (blnTopLimit && dateSelector.Compile()(a) < filterValue)
            || (!blnTopLimit && dateSelector.Compile()(a) > filterValue));
    }
 }

Then you could use it like this:

 var query = queryableCollection
     .DoSpecificFilter((a) => a.RestDate, DateTime.Today, false)
     .DoSpecificFilter((a) => a.TurboDate, DateTime.Today, true);
11
  • 1
    Intuition tells me this won't work, because LINQ doesn't accept Funcs, but Expressions. Changing the parameter type to Expression<Func<T, DateTime>> should work. You can still use it the same way with lambdas.
    – V0ldek
    Aug 10 '18 at 9:35
  • @V0ldek Thanks for the hint. I changed it. Aug 10 '18 at 9:40
  • Hey thanks, but what's the final bool parameter for?
    – AwonDanag
    Aug 10 '18 at 9:45
  • 1
    Can the where T : bit be generic or a parameter as well?
    – AwonDanag
    Aug 10 '18 at 9:49
  • 1
    @DeveloperExceptionError I think you're missing a <T> after the method name, and why does dateSelector(a) don't work?
    – AwonDanag
    Aug 10 '18 at 10:04

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