In what follows, strictNullChecks are assumed to be enabled.

Why does the third example in

declare const first: undefined | number
const firstNumber: number = first === undefined ? 4 : first

declare const second: { value: undefined } | { value: number }
const secondNumber: number = second.value === undefined ? 4 : second.value

declare const third: { type: undefined, value: undefined } | { type: number, value: number }
const thirdNumber: number = third.type === undefined ? 4 : third.value

raise an error?

If I replace the third example with

declare const third: { type: undefined, value: undefined } | { type: 'x', value: number }
const thirdNumber: number = third.type === undefined ? 4 : third.value

so that the discriminated union is between 'x' | undefined instead of number | undefined all seems to work fine.

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The feature you are using here is tagged (or discriminated) unions. From the page that describes this feature (emphasis added):

A discriminant property type guard is an expression of the form x.p == v, x.p === v, x.p != v, or x.p !== v, where p and v are a property and an expression of a string literal type or a union of string literal types. The discriminant property type guard narrows the type of x to those constituent types of x that have a discriminant property p with one of the possible values of v.

The feature is intended to work with literal types. While the description mentions string literal types in the description but this was extended to any literal type, so this also works:

declare const thirdx: { type: undefined, value: undefined } | { type: 1, value: number }
const thirdNumberx: number = thirdx.type === undefined ? 4 : thirdx.value

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