I'm building a control system for a machine with Node on a raspberry pi. There are certain processes that need to stop immediately if one of the safety relays opens. So, I need to checking every 100ms id the safety relays are open, and if they are, send a signal to stop running certain functions.

In general, there will be several functions that need to stop if Relays.allClosed becomes false.

var Relays = {
  relay1: false,
  relay2: false,
  allClosed: false,
  checkRelays: function() {
    if (this.relay1 == true && this.relay2 == true) {
      this.allClosed = true
    } else {
      this.allClosed = false
      console.warn("relay open")
    }
  }
}

var safetyCheck = function() { //checks if safety relays are all closed every 100 ms
  setInterval(function() {
    Relays.checkRelays()
  }, 100)
}

safetyCheck()

Machine.run = function(distance) {
  if (Relays.allClosed) { //checks before running the process if the relays are all closed for safety
    // if at any point while running this Relays.allClosed becomes false, function needs to stop running
    setTimeout(function() {
      console.log('advancing press');
      i++;
      if (i < distance) {
        pressLoop();
      }
    }, 1000)
  } else {
    console.log("can't run machine because one or more safety relay is open")
  }
}

  • 1
    Why not just emit an event realyOpened and then wait for it? And idlf that is really a "safety relay" i would not write the code in JS. – Jonas Wilms Aug 10 at 13:17
  • 1
    setTimeout only fires once, you maybe want setInterval instead. – Keith Aug 10 at 13:17
  • @JonasWilms can you elaborate on both points? emit sounds right but I would need to see an example, thanks – chuckieDub Aug 10 at 13:19
  • @Keith yeah, but the solution Jonas mentions is much more efficient and good as a principle. – Victor Aug 10 at 13:19
  • 1
    How do you update Relays.relay1 / 2 when the state of the physical hardware changes? – Jamiec Aug 10 at 13:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should go with an event based structure instead like:

  const EventEmitter = require('events');

  const input = new EventEmitter();

Through that, you can emit events as:

 relay1.watch((err, value) => input.emit("relay1", !!value));

That way, you can attach a callback to the relay at multiple positions:

 input.on("relay1", on => console.log(on));

Now to get another event when all relays are on its as easy as:

 let relaysCount = 0;
 function updateCount(on) {
   if(on) { 
     relaysCount++;
     if(relaysCount === 2)
       input.emit("allOn");
   } else { 
     relaysCount--;
     input.emit("someOff");
  }
 }

 input.on("relay1", updateCount);
 input.on("relay2", updateCount);

Now when starting a timeout like in your example, you can easily cancel that if some are Off:

 input.on("allOn", () => {
    const task = setTimeout(/* sth */, 1000);
    input.on("someOff", () => clearTimeout(task));
 });
  • good answer, minor point; the plural of relay is relays – Jamiec Aug 10 at 13:40
  • @jamiec good to know, thanks :) – Jonas Wilms Aug 10 at 13:45
  • Any alternative to watch since it has been deprecated? – chuckieDub Aug 11 at 16:27
  • @chuckieDub why is it still in the docs if it is deprecated? – Jonas Wilms Aug 11 at 16:32
  • Can you share a link? – chuckieDub Aug 11 at 16:38

What you should be doing is using something like EventEmitter to emit an event when something meaningful happens. This could be a change in state of your allClosed value (although I'd argue that your method of continually polling for a changed relay state is an anti-pattern and you should be used event-based logic throughout).

But in any case, assuming an allClosed event is raised you can capture that event and stop your running code:

Machine.run = function(distance) {
  if (Relays.allClosed) { //checks before running the process if the relays are all closed for safety
    // if at any point while running this Relays.allClosed becomes false, function needs to stop running
    let timer = setTimeout(function() {
      console.log('advancing press');
      i++;
      if (i < distance) {
        pressLoop();
      }
    }, 1000);

    myEventEmitter.on("allClosed", () => {
       clearTimeout(timer);
    })
  } else {
    console.log("can't run machine because one or more safety relay is open")
  }
}

This will cancel at the next iteration, but if pressLoop is in any way long-running, you should provision for stopping that midway too.


The below code illustrates (with buttons in place of physical relays) how you can run the whole thing a series of events.

// just jQuery for mockup - ignore
  $('.relay').on("click", function () {
      $(this).toggleClass("open").toggleClass("closed");
      events.emit("relayChanged", {id:$(this).data("id"), isClosed: $(this).is(".closed")})
  })
  
  
  function RelayMonitor(){
      var relaysClosed = {
         "1": true,
         "2": true
      }
      
      this.init = function(events){
        events.on("relayChanged", (args) => {
            relaysClosed[args.id] = args.isClosed;
            if(Object.values(relaysClosed).every(x => x)) {
                events.emit("allClosed");
            }
        });
      }
  }
  
  //const EventEmitter = require('events'); // included as cdn import here
  var events = new EventEmitter();
  events.on("allClosed", () => console.log("all relays closed"));
var monitor = new RelayMonitor()
monitor.init(events);
.closed {
background-color:green
}

.open {
background-color:red
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/EventEmitter/5.2.5/EventEmitter.js"></script>
<button data-id="1" class="relay closed">Relay1</button>
<button data-id="2" class="relay closed">Relay2</button>

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