There is a component that encapsulates some library. In order to avoid all this library's event listeners' change detection nightmare, the library is scoped outside the angular zone:

@Component({ ... })
export class TestComponent {

  @Output()
  emitter = new EventEmitter<void>();

  constructor(private ngZone: NgZone) {}

  ngOnInit() {
    this.ngZone.runOutsideAngular(() => {
        // ...
    });    
  }

}

That's all quite clear and common. Now let's add the event to emit the action:

@Component({ ... })
export class TestComponent {

  @Output()
  emitter = new EventEmitter<void>();

  private lib: Lib;

  constructor(private ngZone: NgZone) {}

  ngOnInit() {
    this.ngZone.runOutsideAngular(() => {
      this.lib = new Lib();
    });

    this.lib.on('click', () => {
      this.emitter.emit();
    });
  }

}

Problem is that this emitter does not trigger the change detection because it is triggered outside the zone. What is possible then is to reenter the zone:

@Component({ ... })
export class TestComponent {

  @Output()
  emitter = new EventEmitter<void>();

  private lib: Lib;

  constructor(private ngZone: NgZone) {}

  ngOnInit() {
    this.ngZone.runOutsideAngular(() => {
      this.lib = new Lib();
    });

    this.lib.on('click', () => {
      this.ngZone.run(() => this.emitter.emit());
    });
  }

}

Finally, I come to the question. This this.ngZone.run is forcing the change detection even if I did not listen to this event in the parent component:

<test-component></test-component>

which is not wanted because, well, I did not subscribe to that event => there is nothing to detect.

What could be the solution to that problem?

For those who is interested in the real-life example, the origin of the question is here.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Keep in mind that an @Output() binding that emits a value is by definition a trigger for change detection in the parent. While there might not be any listeners for that binding there could be logic in the parent template that references the component. Maybe via the exportAs or a @ViewChild query. So if you are emitting a value you're informing the parent that the component's state has changed. Maybe in the future the Angular team will change this, but that's how it works currently.

If you want to by pass change detection for that observable then don't use the @Output decorator. Remove the decorator and access the emtter property via the exportAs or use a @ViewChild in the parent component.

Look at how reactive forms work. Directives for controls have public observables for changes that don't use @Output. They are just public observables and you can subscribe to them.

So if you want to have an observable that isn't coupled to change detection, then just make it an observable that is public. That just keeps it simple. Adding logic to emit only if there is a subscriber to an @Output makes a component difficult to understand when you read the source code later.

With that said, this is how I would answer your question so that you can use @Output() only when there is a subscriber.

@Component({})
export class TestComponent implements OnInit {

    private lib: Lib;

    constructor(private ngZone: NgZone) {
    }

    @Output()
    public get emitter(): Observable<void> {
        return new Observable((subscriber) => {
            this.initLib();
            this.lib.on('click', () => {
                this.ngZone.run(() => {
                    subscriber.next();
                });
            });
        });
    }

    ngOnInit() {
        this.initLib();
    }

    private initLib() {
        if (!this.lib) {
            this.ngZone.runOutsideAngular(() => {
                this.lib = new Lib();
            });
        }
    }
}

If I saw this source code in the future, then I would be a little confused as to why the programmer did this. It adds a lot of extra logic that doesn't clearly explain the problem the logic is solving.

  • 1
    that's interesting. Totally forgot about faking the EventEmitter :) I like your solution. It is actually not that ugly if you create a factory with a clarifying name, e.g. @Output() emitter = LazyEventEmitter(/* all required properties for creating observable */), then it becomes quite clear. – smnbbrv Aug 10 at 15:04

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