[EDIT] I've pushed a commit which contains a solution with zero height constraint, however, now I have to deal with implicit UISV constraints.

I've spent hours to understand how to change an animation of appearing/disappearing items inside a stack view. I want to animate appearing of those two buttons from the bottom of the screen, however, they always fly from the top right corner:

Screencast

Is there any Cocoa way to configure the animation to start from the bottom? P.S. Link to the project.

Animation block:

UIView.animate(withDuration: 5.0,
                   delay: 0.5,
                   options: .curveEaseInOut,
                   animations:
        {
            self.buttons.forEach { $0.isHidden = !$0.isHidden }
            self.stack.layoutIfNeeded()
        }, completion: nil)
  • Can you show only your animation block? – Rakesha Shastri Aug 10 at 14:23
  • The project that you have linked to doesn't have any stack views or animation code. – Abizern Aug 10 at 14:27
  • I don't think stackviews are meant for this kind of animation. Why do you want to use a stackview for this in the first place? – Rakesha Shastri Aug 10 at 14:29
  • @Abizern Uploaded – adnako Aug 10 at 14:47
  • @RakeshaShastri, Because it is simpler to layout than regular UIView. – adnako Aug 10 at 14:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here are two ways to make it look like the buttons are sliding up from the bottom of the screen. Neither way involves changing the height of the stack view or the isHidden of the buttons.

Solution 1

This solution works well if the bottom edge of your view controller's view (the “root view” of the scene) is at the bottom edge of the screen, or has “Clip to Bounds” enabled.

  • Constrain the stack view's bottom to the bottom of the safe area of the root view, with priority 999.
  • Constrain the stack view's top to the bottom of the root view (not the safe area), with priority 1000, but make this constraint inactive by unchecking “Installed” in its Attributes inspector. Connect an outlet named stackHidingConstraint to this constraint.

To toggle the visibility of the buttons, set stackHidingConstraint.isActive = !stackHidingConstraint.isActive. When the constraint is active, it hides the buttons by putting the stack view off the bottom edge of the root view. When the constraint is inactive, the priority-999 bottom edge constraint shows the buttons by putting the stack view above the bottom edge of the root view's safe area.

It looks like this:

demo 1

Solution 2

This solution works in cases where solution 1 doesn't (if the bottom edge of your scene's root view isn't at the bottom edge of the screen and doesn't have “Clip to Bounds” enabled), but requires a small change to the view hierarchy.

  • Embed the stack view in a container UIView. Let's call this the stack-hiding view.
  • Turn on “Clip to Bounds” for the stack-hiding view.
  • Constrain the left, right, and bottom edges of the stack-hiding view to the left, right, and bottom edges of the root view's safe area.
  • Constrain the left, right, and top edges of the stack view to the left, right, and top edges of the stack-hiding view.
  • Constrain the bottom edge of the stack view to the bottom edge of the stack-hiding view with priority 999.
  • Constrain the height of the stack-hiding view to 0. Connect an outlet named stackHidingConstraint to this constraint. Make this constraint inactive (uninstalled) in the storyboard.

Once again, to toggle the visibility of the buttons, set stackHidingConstraint.isActive = !stackHidingConstraint.isActive. When the constraint is active, it hides the buttons by setting the stack-hiding view's height to zero. Since the stack-hiding view clips its subviews, this makes the subviews invisible. When the constraint is inactive, the priority-999 bottom edge constraint makes the stack-hiding view equal in height to the stack view, so the subviews are visible.

It looks like this:

demo 2

The only visible difference from solution 1 is that, in solution 1, you can see the buttons slide under the tab bar. In solution 2, they don't slide under the tab bar.

You can find my test project here: https://github.com/mayoff/StackViewAnimation

  • clap clap for the effort! And in my opinion you should see the button slide from under the bar. – Rakesha Shastri Aug 10 at 16:25

I've fixed it using an animation of a height constraint. Seems like it is the only way to implement the behaviour.

  • That is wrong. You are supposed to animate a full button from the bottom up. Not animate the height. The user know the difference. Please take a look at Rob's answer. – Rakesha Shastri Aug 10 at 16:23

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.