I'm trying to write a basic script to compile HTML file includes. The premise goes like this:

I have 3 files

test.html

<div>
   @include include1.html

   <div>content</div>

   @include include2.html
</div>

include1.html

<span>
   banana
</span>

include2.html

<span>
   apple
</span>

My desired output would be:

output.html

<div>
   <span>
      banana
   </span>

   <div>content</div>

   <span>
      apple
   </span>
</div>

I've tried the following:

  1. sed "s|@include \(.*)|$(cat \1)|" test.html >output.html
    This returns cat: 1: No such file or directory

  2. sed "s|@include \(.*)|cat \1|" test.html >output.html
    This runs but gives:

    output.html

    <div>
       cat include1.html
    
       <div>content</div>
    
       cat include2.html
    </div>
    

Any ideas on how to run cat inside sed using group substitution? Or perhaps another solution.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I wrote this 15-20 years ago to recursively include files and it's included in the article I wrote about how/when to use getline under "Applications" then "d)". I tweaked it now to work with your specific "@include" directive, provide indenting to match the "@include" indentation, and added a safeguard against infinite recursion (e.g. file A includes file B and file B includes file A):

$ cat tst.awk
function read(file,indent) {
    if ( isOpen[file]++ ) {
        print "Infinite recursion detected" | "cat>&2"
        exit 1
    }

    while ( (getline < file) > 0) {
        if ($1 == "@include") {
             match($0,/^[[:space:]]+/)
             read($2,indent substr($0,1,RLENGTH))
        } else {
             print indent $0
        }
    }
    close(file)

    delete isOpen[file]
}

BEGIN{
   read(ARGV[1],"")
   exit
}

.

$ awk -f tst.awk test.html
<div>
   <span>
      banana
   </span>

   <div>content</div>

   <span>
      apple
   </span>
</div>

Note that if include1.html itself contained a @include ... directive then it'd be honored too, and so on. Look:

$ for i in test.html include?.html; do printf -- '-----\n%s\n' "$i"; cat "$i"; done
-----
test.html
<div>
   @include include1.html

   <div>content</div>

   @include include2.html
</div>
-----
include1.html
<span>
   @include include3.html
</span>
-----
include2.html
<span>
   apple
</span>
-----
include3.html
<div>
   @include include4.html
</div>
-----
include4.html
<span>
   grape
</span>

.

$ awk -f tst.awk test.html
<div>
   <span>
      <div>
         <span>
            grape
         </span>
      </div>
   </span>

   <div>content</div>

   <span>
      apple
   </span>
</div>

With a non-GNU awk I'd expect it to fail after about 20 levels of recursion with a "too many open files" error so get gawk if you need to go deeper than that or you'd have to write your own file management code.

  • 1
    This is really an awesome awk script for recursive include functionality ++ – anubhava Aug 12 at 16:49

You may use this bash script that uses a regex to detect line starting with @include and grabs include filename using a capture group:

re="@include +([^[:space:]]+)"

while IFS= read -r line; do
    [[ $line =~ $re ]] && cat "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}" || echo "$line"
done < test.html

<div>
<span>
   banana
</span>

   <div>content</div>

<span>
   apple
</span>
</div>

Alternatively you may use this awk script to do the same:

awk '$1 == "@include"{system("cat " $2); next} 1' test.html

If you have GNU sed, you can use the e flag to the s command, which executes the current pattern space as a shell command and replaces it with the output:

$ sed 's/@include/cat/e' test.html
<div>
<span>
   banana
</span>

   <div>content</div>

<span>
   apple
</span>
</div>

Notice that this doesn't take care of indentation, as the included files don't have any. An HTML prettifier like Tidy can help you further for this:

$ sed 's/@include/cat/e' test.html | tidy -iq --show-body-only yes
<div>
  <span>banana</span>
  <div>
    content
  </div><span>apple</span>
</div>

GNU has a command to read a file, r, but the filename can't be generated on the fly.


As Ed points out in his comment, this is vulnerable to shell command injection: if you have something like

@include $(date)

you'll notice that the date command was actually run. This can be prevented, but the conciseness if the original solution is out the window then:

sed 's|@include \(.*\)|cat "$(/usr/bin/printf "%q" '\''\1'\'')"|e' test.html

This still replaces @include with cat, but additionally wraps the rest of the line into a command substitution with printf "%q", so a line such as

@include include1.html

becomes

cat "$(/usr/bin/printf "%q" 'include1.html')"

before being executed as a command. This expands to

cat include1.html

but if the file were named $(date), it becomes

cat '$(date)'

(note the single quotes), preventing the injected command from being executed.

Because s///e seems to use /bin/sh as its shell, you can't rely on Bash's %q format specification in printf to exist, hence the absolute path to the printf binary. For readability, I've changed the / delimiters of the s command to | (so I don't have to escape \/usr\/bin\/printf).

Lastly, the quoting mess around \1 is to get a single quote into a single quoted string: '\'' becomes '.

  • 1
    @EdMorton Good point, let me amend... – Benjamin W. Aug 12 at 18:02

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