In C++, I can create a variadic function template as follows:

#include <tuple>

// helper to loop over tuple
template <std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Args>
void for_each(std::tuple<Args...>& tuple, FuncT func) {
  func(std::get<I>(tuple));
  if constexpr (I + 1 < sizeof...(Args)) {
    for_each<I + 1, FuncT, Args...>(tuple, func);
  }
}

template <class A, class B, class Derived>
struct FBounded {
  auto foo() { return static_cast<Derived *>(this); }
  auto baz() { return static_cast<Derived *>(this); }
};

class Child1 : public FBounded<const char*, const char*, Child1> {};
class Child2 : public FBounded<bool, int, Child2> {};
class Child3 : public FBounded<double, const char*, Child3> {};

template <class... A, class... B, class... SubTypes>
static auto func(FBounded<A, B, SubTypes>... elems) {
  auto args = std::tuple(elems...);
  for_each(args, [](auto x) { x.foo()->baz(); });
}

int main() {
  auto c1 = Child1();
  auto c2 = Child2();
  auto c3 = Child3();

  func(c1, c2, c3);
}

I want to re-create this behavior in Scala. Here is what I have so far:

class FBounded[A, B, T <: FBounded[A, B, T]] {
  def foo(): T = this.asInstanceOf[T]
  def baz(): T = this.asInstanceOf[T]
}

class Child1 extends FBounded[Int, Double, Child1] {}
class Child2 extends FBounded[String, String, Child2] {}
class Child3 extends FBounded[Int, String, Child3] {}

def func(elems: Seq[FBounded[_, _, _]]) = {
    elems.foreach(_.foo.baz)
}


val c1 = new Child1()
val c2 = new Child2()
val c3 = new Child3()

func(c1, c2, c3)

I receive the error:

error: value baz is not a member of _$3
elems.foreach(_.foo.baz)
              ^

I believe this has something to do with when Scala fills out the placeholder types, but I am not sure.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The FBounded[_, _, _]-type is a shortcut for an existential type that looks somewhat like

FBounded[A, B, T] forSome { type A; type B; type T <: FBounded[A, B, T] }

and for whatever reason, the compiler refuses to infer the correct f-bounds for type parameter T (at least I couldn't get it to do that).

I guess that this could be connected in some way to the reason why existential types are dropped in Dotty.

Here is a workaround that simply avoids existential types altogether:

class FBounded[A, B, T <: FBounded[A, B, T]] {
  self: T =>
  def foo: T = self
  def baz: T = self
  def wrap: FBE = new FBE {
    type a = A
    type b = B
    type t = T
    val value: t = self
  }
}

class Child1 extends FBounded[Int, Double, Child1] {}
class Child2 extends FBounded[String, String, Child2] {}
class Child3 extends FBounded[Int, String, Child3] {}

/** Wrapper for FBounded existential types */
abstract class FBE {
  type a
  type b
  type t <: FBounded[a, b, t]
  val value: t
}

def func(elems: FBE*) = {
  elems.map(_.value.foo.baz)
}

val c1 = new Child1()
val c2 = new Child2()
val c3 = new Child3()

func(c1.wrap, c2.wrap, c3.wrap)

Instead of relying on the existential FBounded[_, _, _], it uses a wrapper class FBE that holds a long lists with all types and all the constraints. With FBE, the func seems to work just fine:

def func(elems: FBE*) = {
  elems.map(_.value.foo.baz)
}

because it can be written out more explicitly as:

def funcMoreExplicit(elems: FBE*) = {
  elems.map(e => {
    val v: e.t = e.value
    val fooRes: e.t = v.foo
    val bazRes: e.t = fooRes.baz
    bazRes
  })
}

where we can use the explicit path dependent type e.t provided by FBE.t for intermediate results.

  • 1
    This is a great answer! So if I understand, the idea is we need to use a helper class to erase the type of the F-Bounded parent, then the compiler won't need to use the place-holder types? – Nik Aug 10 at 18:17
  • 1
    @Nik We need the FBE wrapper exactly so that we don't lose all the type parameters - we have a, b and t there, and we also know that t <: FBounded[a, b, t], so we know all there is to know about the combination of types, and we have those types fully under control. When we try to do this with unnamed wildcard types, we have to rely on the compiler, and hope that it will infer all the necessary constraints on the synthetic dummy types _1, _2 etc. In this case, the compiler failed for some reason. So, I just took over the control, and forced it to compile by using PDTs. – Andrey Tyukin Aug 10 at 18:22
  • 1
    @Nik path dependent types are somewhat of Scala's sledgehammer for solving all the problems. Somewhat like the overpowered templates in C++. Funny enough, in this case translating template-heavy code into path-dependent-type-heavy code works out just nicely. – Andrey Tyukin Aug 10 at 18:23
  • Ah. So we don't lose the types since they are saved as type parameters in the wrapper. Thanks! – Nik Aug 11 at 19:20

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