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This question already has an answer here:

I don't really know how to ask this.

I have the same date saved in two variables. Then I add 100 days to the second variable. But both seem to be altered. Why does that happens?

$begin = new DateTime("20180101");
$end = $begin;
$end = $end->add(new DateInterval('P100D'));

echo $begin->format('Y-m-d') . "<br>";
echo $end->format('Y-m-d');

result is:

2018-04-11

2018-04-11

but I expected:

2018-01-01

2018-04-11

marked as duplicate by aynber, Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans, Barmar php Aug 10 '18 at 19:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    add() modifies the object. It returns itself for chaining purposes, but you're not "getting a new date", you're getting the same date object, that has been bumped up by however long an interval you specified. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Aug 10 '18 at 19:17
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    Oddly, when you create $end, it's really a pointer to $begin. You need to clone the object instead. I couldn't explain why it works this way, though. – aynber Aug 10 '18 at 19:19
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    @aynber why is that "oddly"? That is literally how variable assignment works. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Aug 10 '18 at 19:19
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    You actually don't need to go much further @aynber, this behaves exactly the same with, say: stdClass. If you create one object from it, set an attribute, equals another variable using it, and then change this attribute, it will do exactly the same. – Rafael Aug 10 '18 at 19:25
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    I... actually disagree that this is a duplicated question for the one mentioned. He never asked how to deep copy a DateTime object, he merely asked why the dates kept the same, which, even if answered in the referenced topic, is not what he asked. – Rafael Aug 10 '18 at 19:31
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If you want to have different days using the same DateTime object, you have to do this:

$begin = new DateTime("20180101");
$end = clone $begin;
$end = $end->add(new DateInterval('P100D'));

echo $begin->format('Y-m-d') . "<br>";
echo $end->format('Y-m-d');

And as of why: PHP is using the same object by reference... If you create two different objects DateTime by new DateTime('pattern') it will behave perfectly ok.

The behaviour you are seeing now can be observed like this also:

$test = new stdClass();
$test->sample = "What!?";

$another = $test;
$another->sample = "Impossibru!";

echo $another->sample . "<br>";
echo $test->sample . "<br>";
  • Instead of cloning DateTime use DateTimeImmutable instead. – vascowhite Aug 12 '18 at 3:12
  • DateTimeImmutable is a very specific solution that can be used only in this kind of object, as of cloning works on every object... – Rafael Aug 12 '18 at 5:24
  • This is a very specific question with a specific optimal solution :) – vascowhite Aug 13 '18 at 16:37
  • Well. If I can give a solution that will work on this and any other object. Why should I specify a solution only for this object? – Rafael Aug 13 '18 at 18:04

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