188

In using the EntityFramework, I get the error "A lambda expression with a statement body cannot be converted to an expression tree" when trying to compile the following code:

Obj[] myArray = objects.Select(o =>
{
    var someLocalVar = o.someVar;

    return new Obj() { 
    Var1 = someLocalVar,
    Var2 = o.var2 };
}).ToArray();

I don't know what the error means and most of all how to fix it. Any help?

  • 6
    try to convert to to list like this. objects.List().Select(... – nelson eldoro Oct 10 '13 at 15:57

10 Answers 10

124

Is objects a Linq-To-SQL database context? In which case, you can only use simple expressions to the right of the => operator. The reason is, these expressions are not executed, but are converted to SQL to be executed against the database. Try this

Arr[] myArray = objects.Select(o => new Obj() { 
    Var1 = o.someVar,
    Var2 = o.var2 
}).ToArray();
101

You can use statement body in lamba expression for IEnumerable collections. try this one:

Obj[] myArray = objects.AsEnumerable().Select(o =>
{
    var someLocalVar = o.someVar;

    return new Obj() 
    { 
        Var1 = someLocalVar,
        Var2 = o.var2 
    };
}).ToArray();

Notice:
Think carefully when using this method, because this way, you will have all query result in memory, that may have unwanted side effects on the rest of your code.

  • 4
    +1 I like this! Adding AsEnumerable() maskes my problem go away! – Joel Jul 9 '13 at 11:40
  • 5
    This is the real solution, the accepted answer is difficult to apply in some cases – Ferran Salguero Aug 2 '13 at 10:47
  • 19
    No this is not the real answer. It would make your query to be executed on client side. Refer to this question for details: stackoverflow.com/questions/33375998/… – Luke Vo Oct 27 '15 at 19:09
  • 1
    @DatVM it depends on what you are going to do. this can not be always right choice and of course can not be always wrong choice. – Amir Oveisi Oct 28 '15 at 10:33
  • 4
    Though I agree with you, the OP stated that he was using EntityFramework. Most of the case, when working with EF, you want the database-side to do as much work as possible. It would be nice if you note the case in your answer. – Luke Vo Oct 28 '15 at 14:34
41

It means that you can't use lambda expressions with a "statement body" (i.e. lambda expressions which use curly braces) in places where the lambda expression needs to be converted to an expression tree (which is for example the case when using linq2sql).

  • 43
    You... slightly rephrased the error. @Tim Rogers' answer was much better – vbullinger Feb 27 '13 at 18:18
  • 3
    @vbullinger you're right to a degree, but in a more general sense (outside the context of linq-to-sql) this is a more direct answer. It helped me with an AutoMapper error – mlhDev Dec 30 '14 at 15:52
  • 1
    vbullinger: It did help me, though. – Paul Jan 2 '19 at 16:32
9

Without knowing more about what you are doing (Linq2Objects, Linq2Entities, Linq2Sql?), this should make it work:

Arr[] myArray = objects.AsEnumerable().Select(o => {
    var someLocalVar = o.someVar;

    return new Obj() { 
        Var1 = someLocalVar,
        Var2 = o.var2 
    }; 
}).ToArray();
  • 12
    This forces the queryable to evaluate. – smartcaveman Mar 3 '11 at 10:32
  • However, in this circumstance it is okay, because he calls ToArray() right after anyway. – smartcaveman Mar 3 '11 at 10:38
  • 2
    not necessarily -- who knows how big "o" is? it could have 50 properties when all we want are 2. – kdawg Apr 15 '11 at 13:46
  • 1
    When using this technique, I like to select the fields I will use into an anonymous type before calling .AsEnumerable() – Blake Mitchell Dec 15 '14 at 21:16
5

The LINQ to SQL return object were implementing IQueryable interface. So for Select method predicate parameter you should only supply single lambda expression without body.

This is because LINQ for SQL code is not execute inside program rather than on remote side like SQL server or others. This lazy loading execution type were achieve by implementing IQueryable where its expect delegate is being wrapped in Expression type class like below.

Expression<Func<TParam,TResult>>

Expression tree do not support lambda expression with body and its only support single line lambda expression like var id = cols.Select( col => col.id );

So if you try the following code won't works.

Expression<Func<int,int>> function = x => {
    return x * 2;
}

The following will works as per expected.

Expression<Func<int,int>> function = x => x * 2;
4

Use this overload of select:

Obj[] myArray = objects.Select(new Func<Obj,Obj>( o =>
{
    var someLocalVar = o.someVar;

    return new Obj() 
    { 
       Var1 = someLocalVar,
       Var2 = o.var2 
    };
})).ToArray();
  • This works for me but when used with Entity Framework would this solution prevent the dbcontext from loading all rows into memory first, like AsEnumerable() would? – parliament Nov 23 '14 at 21:57
  • 2
    @parliament:To prevent loading all rows into memory you should use Expression<Func<Obj,Obj>>. – Mohsen Nov 25 '14 at 5:42
3

9 years too late to the party, but a different approach to your problem (that nobody has mentioned?):

The statement-body works fine with Func<> but won't work with Expression<Func<>>. IQueryable.Select wants an Expression<>, because they can be translated for Entity Framework - Func<> can not.

So you either use the AsEnumerable and start working with the data in memory (not recommended, if not really neccessary) or you keep working with the IQueryable<> which is recommended. There is something called linq query which makes some things easier:

IQueryable<Obj> result = from o in objects
                         let someLocalVar = o.someVar
                         select new Obj
                         {
                           Var1 = someLocalVar,
                           Var2 = o.var2
                         };

with let you can define a variable and use it in the select (or where,...) - and you keep working with the IQueryable until you really need to execute and get the objects.

Afterwards you can Obj[] myArray = result.ToArray()

  • 1
    I just looked this up! Wish you could have seen the intrigue on my face when i saw a 9 year old post have a "A new answer has been added to this post". Hahaha Nice timing. – TeaBaerd Jul 22 '20 at 11:25
  • @TeaBaerd haha yeah. :D coincidences are funny sometimes... – Matthias Burger Jul 22 '20 at 11:28
2

It means that a Lambda expression of type TDelegate which contains a ([parameters]) => { some code }; cannot be converted to an Expression<TDelegate>. It's the rule.

Simplify your query. The one you provided can be rewritten as the following and will compile:

Arr[] myArray = objects.Select(o => new Obj()
                {
                   Var1 = o.someVar,
                   Var2 = o.var2
                } ).ToArray();
1

Is Arr a base type of Obj? Does the Obj class exist? Your code would work only if Arr is a base type of Obj. You can try this instead:

Obj[] myArray = objects.Select(o =>
{
    var someLocalVar = o.someVar;

    return new Obj() 
    { 
       Var1 = someLocalVar,
       Var2 = o.var2 
    };
}).ToArray();
1

For your specific case, the body is for creating a variable, and switching to IEnumerable will force all the operations to be processed on client-side, I propose the following solution.

Obj[] myArray = objects
.Select(o => new
{
    SomeLocalVar = o.someVar, // You can even use any LINQ statement here
    Info = o,
}).Select(o => new Obj()
{
    Var1 = o.SomeLocalVar,
    Var2 = o.Info.var2,
    Var3 = o.SomeLocalVar.SubValue1,
    Var4 = o.SomeLocalVar.SubValue2,
}).ToArray();

Edit: Rename for C# Coding Convention

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