So today I was watching The mind behind Linux | Linus Torvalds, Linus posted two pieces of code in the video, both of them are used for removing a certain element in a singly-linked list.

The first one (which is the normal one):

void remove_list_entry(linked_list* entry) {
    linked_list* prev = NULL;
    linked_list* walk = head;
    while (walk != entry) {
        prev = walk;
        walk = walk->next;
    }
    if (!prev) {
        head = entry->next;
    } else {
        prev->next = entry->next;
    }
}

And the better one:

void remove_list_entry(linked_list* entry) {
    // The "indirect" pointer points to the
    // *address* of the thing we'll update
    linked_list** indirect = &head;

    // Walk the list, looking for the thing that
    // points to the entry we want to remove
    while ((*indirect) != entry)
        indirect = &(*indirect)->next;

    // .. and just remove it
    *indirect = entry->next;
}

So I cannot understand the second piece of code, what happens when *indirect = entry->next; evaluates? I cannot see why it leads to the remove of the certain entry. Someone explains it please, thanks!

up vote 3 down vote accepted

what happens when *indirect = entry->next; evaluates? I cannot see why it leads to the remove of the certain entry.

I hope you have clear understanding of double pointers1).

Assume following:
Node structure is

typedef struct Node {
    int data;
    struct Node *next;
} linked_list;

and linked list is having 5 nodes and the entry pointer pointing to second node in the list. The in-memory view would be something like this:

                          entry -+
   head                          |
      +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
      |   |---->| 1 |   |---->| 2 |   |---->| 3 |   |---->| 4 |   |---->| 5 |NULL|
      +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+

This statement:

linked_list** indirect = &head;

will make indirect pointer pointing to head.

                         entry -+
  head                          |
     +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
     |   |---->| 1 |   |---->| 2 |   |---->| 3 |   |---->| 4 |   |---->| 5 |NULL|
     +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
       ^
       |
     +---+
     |   |
     +---+
   indirect

The while loop

    while ((*indirect) != entry)

*indirect will give the address of first node because head is pointing to first node and since entry is pointing to second node the loop condition evaluates to true and following code will execute:

indirect = &(*indirect)->next;

this will make the indirect pointer pointing to the next pointer of first node. The in-memory view:

                          entry -+
   head                          |
      +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
      |   |---->| 1 |   |---->| 2 |   |---->| 3 |   |---->| 4 |   |---->| 5 |NULL|
      +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
                      ^
                      |
                    +---+
                    |   |
                    +---+
                  indirect

now the while loop condition will be evaluated. Because the indirect pointer is now pointing to next of first node, the *indirect will give the address of second node and since entry is pointing to second node the loop condition evaluates to false and the loop exits.
The following code will execute now:

*indirect = entry->next;

The *indirect dereference to next of first node and it is now assigned the next of node which entry pointer is pointing to. The in-memory view:

                          entry -+
   head                          |
      +---+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
      |   |---->| 1 |   |--   | 2 |   |---->| 3 |   |---->| 4 |   |---->| 5 |NULL|
      +---+     +-------+  \  +-------+     +-------+     +-------+     +--------+
                  *indirect \              /
                             +------------+

Now the next of first node is pointing to third node in the list and that way the second node is removed from the list.

Hope this clear all of your doubts.


EDIT:

David has suggested, in comment, to add some details around - why are the (..) parenthesis required in &(*indirect)->next?

The type of indirect is linked_list **, which means it can hold the address of pointer of type linked_list *. The *indirect will give the pointer of type linked_list * and ->next will give its next pointer.
But we cannot write *indirect->next because the precedence of operator -> is higher than unary * operator. So, *indirect->next will be interpreted as *(indirect->next) which is syntactically wrong because indirect is a pointer to pointer. Hence we need () around *indirect.

Also, &(*indirect)->next will be interpreted as &((*indirect)->next), which is the address of the next pointer.


1) If you don't know how double pointer works, check below:

Lets take an example:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
        int a=1, b=2;
        int *p = &a;
        int **pp = &p;

        printf ("1. p : %p\n", (void*)p);
        printf ("1. pp : %p\n", (void*)pp);
        printf ("1. *p : %d\n", *p);
        printf ("1. *pp : %d\n", **pp);

        *pp = &b;  // this will change the address to which pointer p pointing to
        printf ("2. p : %p\n", (void*)p);
        printf ("2. pp : %p\n", (void*)pp);
        printf ("2. *p : %d\n", *p);
        printf ("2. *pp : %d\n", **pp);

        return 0;
}

In the above code, in this statement - *pp = &b;, you can see that without accessing pointer p directly we can change the address it is pointing to using a double pointer pp, which is pointing to pointer p, because dereferencing the double pointer pp will give pointer p.

Its output:

1. p : 0x7ffeedf75a38
1. pp : 0x7ffeedf75a28
1. *p : 1
1. *pp : 1
2. p : 0x7ffeedf75a34   <=========== changed 
2. pp : 0x7ffeedf75a28
2. *p : 2
2. *pp : 2

In-memory view would be something like this:

//Below in the picture
//100 represents 0x7ffeedf75a38 address
//200 represents 0x7ffeedf75a34 address
//300 represents 0x7ffeedf75a28 address

int *p = &a
      p         a
      +---+     +---+
      |100|---->| 1 |
      +---+     +---+

        int **pp = &p;

      pp        p         a
      +---+     +---+     +---+
      |300|---->|100|---->| 1 |
      +---+     +---+     +---+


*pp = &b;

      pp        p         b
      +---+     +---+     +---+
      |300|---->|200|---->| 2 |
      +---+     +---+     +---+
                ^^^^^     ^^^^^
  • Ooh, Good answer. The only question I have lingering as a new C programmer is why are the (..) parenthesis required around &(*indirect)->next? – David C. Rankin Aug 11 at 6:14
  • @DavidC.Rankin thanks. Included your suggestion. – H.S. Aug 11 at 9:41
  • @H.S. Thanks!!! This is a brilliant answer, now I totally get it :D – Jiahao Aug 11 at 14:51
  • @H.S. now as a new C programmer I would get it completely. Damn good effort. – David C. Rankin Aug 11 at 23:50

The entry isn't really "deleted", it's just no longer in the list. If this is your chain:

A --> B --> C --> D --> E --> ■

And you want to delete C, you're really just linking over it. It's still there in memory, but no longer accessible from your data structure.

            C 
A --> B --------> D --> E --> ■

That last line sets the next pointer of B to D instead of C.

  • I cannot understand how it links over the element through *indirect = entry->next;. – Jiahao Aug 10 at 22:10

Instead of looping through the entries in the list, as the first example does, the second example loops through the pointers to the entries in the list. That allows the second example to have the simple conclusion with the statement you've asked about, which in English is "set the pointer that used to point to the entry I want to remove from the list so that it now points to whatever that entry was pointing to". In other words, it makes the pointer that was pointing to the entry you're removing point past the entry you're removing.

The first example has to have a special way to handle the unique case of the entry you want to remove being the first entry in the list. Because the second example loops through the pointers (starting with &head), it doesn't have a special case.

*indirect = entry->next; That just move it to the next node You need to remove the entry one So you have to point .. before entry node the next of the entry node So your loop should stop before the entry while ((*indirect)->next != entry) indirect = &(*indirect)->next

(*indirect)->Next =entry-> next

I hope that help you

  • Actually this piece of code works fine... – Jiahao Aug 10 at 22:03
  • And you need to save the entry .. to free it after the point on next one – ayman gazal Aug 10 at 22:04
  • That's the confusing part, the entry is still there, it is not lost in that piece of code. – Jiahao Aug 10 at 22:08
  • Yea .. if you code that linked list with malloc func .. or realloc dont matter you need to free the node you want to delete .. just use the free function , free(entry) but at the last its mean after you pointed on the next one – ayman gazal Aug 10 at 22:10
  • And don’t forget to change the next of the node that before the entry one .. to the next its the most important part – ayman gazal Aug 10 at 22:13

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