2

This is an extension to this question where only the point is moving.

Now i want to move the earth too, along with the animated point such that the moving point is always in center. Eg:

Rotating Earth with an animated path

Now i can create each frame and add them together to create a animated image, using this code.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import cartopy.crs as ccrs

lonlats = np.array([[-73.134961, 40.789142],  [-75.46884485, 41.13443837],
  [-77.825617, 41.43196017],  [-80.20222645, 41.68077343],
  [-82.5953765, 41.88007994],  [-85.00155934, 42.02922872],
  [-87.4170967, 42.12772575],  [-89.83818577, 42.17524151],
  [-92.26094893, 42.17161608],  [-94.68148587, 42.11686169],
  [-97.09592644, 42.01116249],  [-99.50048253, 41.8548717],
  [-101.89149735, 41.6485061],  [-104.26549065, 41.39273816],
  [-106.61919861, 41.08838607],  [-108.94960746, 40.73640202],
  [-111.25398017, 40.33785904],  [-113.52987601, 39.89393695],
  [-115.7751629, 39.40590768],  [-117.98802295, 38.87512048],
  [-120.16695169, 38.3029872],  [-122.3107517, 37.6909682]])

for frame in range(0, len(lonlats)):
  ax = plt.axes(projection=ccrs.Orthographic(central_longitude=lonlats[frame][0], central_latitude=30))
  ax.background_img(name='BM', resolution='medium')
  line = plt.plot(lonlats[:frame + 1, 0], lonlats[:frame + 1, 1], color='red', transform=ccrs.PlateCarree())[0]
  plt.savefig(f'img{frame:03}.png')
  #print(f'img{frame:03}.png')
  plt.close()

Is there any way to get this animation in the plot window only without saving the images?

2

Before we start, it is important to remember that cartopy's forte is in dealing with projected data. No matter how 3d the Orthographic projection looks, it really is just a 2D representation of your data - matplotlib and cartopy's matplotlib interface fundamentally operate in 2D space, so any 3D appearances have to be computed (on the CPU, rather than a GPU) for each perspective. For example, if you project some coastlines to an Orthographic projection and then want to slightly rotate the Orthographic projection, you need to do all of the projection calculations again. Doing such a thing in 3d (using something like OpenGL) is conceivable, but there is nothing in cartopy / matpltolib to make this something you can use off the shelf.

OK, caveat aside, perhaps the most important thing to note about this question is: cartopy's GeoAxes is designed for a single, immutable, projection. There is no API to allow you to change the projection once it has been instantiated. The only thing we can do therefore is to create a new GeoAxes for each rotation.

The pattern to achieve such a thing might look something like:

def decorate_axes(ax):
    ax.coastlines()
    ...

def animate(i):
    ax = plt.gca()
    ax.remove()

    ax = plt.axes(projection=...)
    decorate_axes(ax)

ani = animation.FuncAnimation(
    plt.gcf(), animate,
    ...)

A quick proof of concept:

import cartopy.crs as ccrs
import matplotlib.animation as animation
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

plt.figure(figsize=(6, 6))


def decorate_axes(ax):
    ax.set_global()
    ax.coastlines()


def animate(i):
    lon = i

    ax = plt.gca()
    ax.remove()

    ax = plt.axes([0, 0, 1, 1], projection=ccrs.Orthographic(
        central_latitude=0, central_longitude=lon))
    decorate_axes(ax)


ani = animation.FuncAnimation(
    plt.gcf(), animate,
    frames=np.linspace(0, 360, 40),
    interval=125, repeat=False)

ani.save('poc.gif', writer='imagemagick', dpi=plt.gcf().dpi)

Rotating globe

So now that we have the fundamentals, let's build upon the answer you referred to to animate the rotation of an Orthographic projection based on the path of a great circle using the pattern we have developed above...

import cartopy.crs as ccrs
import cartopy.feature as cfeature
import matplotlib.animation as animation
import matplotlib.image as mimage
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.transforms as mtransforms
import numpy as np
import shapely.geometry as sgeom


plt.figure(figsize=(6, 6))

line = sgeom.LineString([[0, 15], [-140, -40], [120, -20],
                         [0, -20], [-140, 15], [90, 45],
                         [0, 15]])


class HighResPC(ccrs.PlateCarree):
    @property
    def threshold(self):
        return super(HighResPC, self).threshold / 100


projected_line = HighResPC().project_geometry(line, ccrs.Geodetic())


verts = np.concatenate([np.array(l.coords) for l in projected_line])


def setup_axes(ax, x, y):
    ax.set_global()

    ax.add_feature(cfeature.LAND)
    ax.add_feature(cfeature.OCEAN)

    # Add the projected line to the map.
    ax.add_geometries(
        [projected_line], HighResPC(),
        edgecolor='blue', facecolor='none')

    # Image from http://madmen.wikia.com/wiki/File:Superman.gif.
    superman = plt.imread('superman.png')

    # Scale the actual image down a little.
    img_size = np.array(superman.shape) / 2

    x, y = ax.projection.transform_point(x, y, ccrs.PlateCarree())
    # Convert the projected coordinates into pixels.
    x_pix, y_pix = ax.transData.transform((x, y))

    # Make the extent handle the appropriate image size.
    extent = [x_pix - 0.5 * img_size[1], y_pix - 0.5 * img_size[0],
              x_pix + 0.5 * img_size[1], y_pix + 0.5 * img_size[0]]

    bbox = mtransforms.Bbox.from_extents(extent)
    img = mimage.BboxImage(bbox, zorder=10)
    img.set_data(superman)
    ax.add_artist(img)

    return img


def animate_superman(i):
    i = i % verts.shape[0]

    ax = plt.gca()
    ax.remove()

    ax = plt.axes([0, 0, 1, 1], projection=ccrs.Orthographic(
        central_latitude=verts[i, 1], central_longitude=verts[i, 0]))
    ax.coastlines()

    img = setup_axes(ax, verts[i, 0], verts[i, 1])


ani = animation.FuncAnimation(
    plt.gcf(), animate_superman,
    frames=verts.shape[0],
    interval=125, repeat=False)

ani.save('superman.gif', writer='imagemagick', dpi=plt.gcf().dpi)

Animated spinning globe using cartopy

What I really love about this animation is that the great circles that are being followed start out very curved as they first appear on the globe, and the moment they include the central point of the projection they become straight lines. More generally, for all Azimuthal projections (of which Orthographic is one) great circles from the central point are always straight lines... Wikipedia states:

therefore great circles through the central point are represented by straight lines on the map.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map_projection#Azimuthal_.28projections_onto_a_plane.29

There are a few issues worth noting with this animation:

  • the animation isn't particularly smooth: the solution is to increase the resolution with the threshold of the custom projection (HighResPC).
  • the globe isn't rotating at a constant velocity: the solution is probably to use the geographiclib tools to generate great circles based a particular step-size (in meters)
  • the animation isn't particularly fast: whilst cartopy can just about handle projecting low-resolution coastlines at a reasonable frame rate, the image transformation stuff doesn't (it really isn't optimised for performance at all). You won't therefore be able to do something like a ax.stock_img() at anywhere near the frequency you desire for interactive animations.

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