15

Can someone explain why my div with table-layout:fixed is changing the width of its parent element (body in this case) to make it 100% when it shouldn't be 100% since it's positioned?

body {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  margin:0;
  padding: 0;
  position: absolute;
}

.c{
  display: table;
  width: 80%; /* Any percentage value different from 0 */
  table-layout:fixed;
  outline: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="c">d</div>

As you can see above, adding table-layout:fixed forces the body to be full width AND the percentage width on the div will work relatively to the width of the body!

This is not the case with the below snippet, where the behavior is somehow logical and intuitive:

body {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  margin:0;
  padding: 0;
  position: absolute;
}

.c{
  display: table;
  width: 80%;
  /* table-layout:fixed; */
  outline: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="c">d</div>

How does table-layout:fixed affect the parent element, which is positioned in this case?


As a side note, using pixel values with width produces a logical result:

body {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  margin:0;
  padding: 0;
  position: absolute;
}

.c{
  display: table;
  width: 200px; 
  table-layout:fixed;
  outline: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="c">d</div>

We can also have some overflow with that strange behavior:

body {
 margin:0;
 position:relative;
 width:300px;
 border-top:20px solid green;
}

.container {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  position: absolute;
}

.c {
  display: table;
  width: 120%; 
  table-layout: fixed;
  outline: 2px solid blue;
  animation:change 2s linear infinite alternate;
}

@keyframes change {
  from{width:1%;}
  to {width:150%}
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="c">d</div>
</div>

8
  • It seems like it might be related to 'position: absolute', if you remove that then it does honor the body width.
    – Ryan Gibbs
    Aug 13, 2018 at 21:16
  • @RyanGibbs removing position absolute will make the element to be inflow and by default it's a block element thus it has width:100% and table-layout will do nothing in this case Aug 13, 2018 at 21:29
  • @TemaniAfif If the title does not describe the problem, then OP needs to change the title and body, because the title I wrote says the same thing as the problem statement in the body itself. At the very least, any changes to the title should be sure to use articles and proper grammar :-)
    – TylerH
    Aug 14, 2018 at 20:28
  • @TylerH but look at the tile and the first line ... you made the title to say "why it's not honoring my percentage width" which is the opposite because this is what is happening ... and the first line is say "why table-layout fixed is not honoring the body width" so it has nothing to do with the percentage, but the width of the parent Aug 14, 2018 at 20:31
  • @TemaniAfif Well, in that case... easily fixed :-) No need to roll back to a fragmented title with repeated words
    – TylerH
    Aug 14, 2018 at 20:33

3 Answers 3

8
+50

Looks like you're not the first to bring this up. You might be the second, though.

To be clear, this is a combination of two issues:

  1. The width of an absolutely positioned element is shrink-to-fit. Somehow the shrink-to-fit width is being determined to be as wide as the absposed element's containing block will allow. (The containing block for the absolutely positioned body is the initial containing block.)

  2. A percentage width on an element whose containing block depends on its contents for auto sizing results in undefined behavior.

Issue #2 is pretty easy to write off:

implementations agree not to calculate the width of either element more than once.

i.e. body is sized using shrink-to-fit, then the table is set to 80% of that width, and the size of body is "not computed again". The only "undefinedness" of this is that the spec doesn't require or disallow, or indeed care what implementations do.

So the question then boils down to why shrink-to-fit is yielding "as wide as possible" in #1 prior to determining the size of the table in #2. Here is how the spec describes shrink-to-fit for absposed elements:

[...] Roughly: calculate the preferred width by formatting the content without breaking lines other than where explicit line breaks occur, and also calculate the preferred minimum width, e.g., by trying all possible line breaks. CSS 2.1 does not define the exact algorithm. Thirdly, calculate the available width: this is found by solving for 'width' after setting 'left' (in case 1) or 'right' (in case 3) to 0.

Then the shrink-to-fit width is: min(max(preferred minimum width, available width), preferred width).

But this doesn't tell us why, or even that, the preferred width of a fixed-layout table is "as wide as its containing block will allow". Neither css-sizing-3 nor css-tables-3 appears to contain the answer.

According to David Baron (from the same thread), who works on Gecko:

Fixed-layout tables report an intrinsic max-content inline size as infinite.

(note that "max-content inline size" means the same thing as "preferred width")

So there's our answer. The unbounded max-content inline size of fixed-layout tables is what causes this table's absolutely positioned parent to be stretched as wide as its own containing block (the initial containing block) will allow, in contrast to auto-layout tables.

And, at least for now, this is as close as I'll get to an official source because I'm having trouble reaching the same conclusion just by reading css-sizing-3, and I'm unsure if David's statement is based on Gecko's behavior alone, behavior of all implementations, or on specified behavior.

3
  • It's somehow clear but I need to read it again 3 or 4 times to get everything :p ... And I agree that the infinite size is somehow the answer, because If we try with inline-block we get a similar result: jsfiddle.net/5ayuznrf/1 ... So I think we can ommit the part related to absolute position. So it's a combination about that infinite thing and the cycle of width calculation. Aug 16, 2018 at 15:36
  • 1
    @Temani Afif: And floats, too. The key is the shrink-to-fit sizing (aka fit-content), which applies to all three of these :)
    – BoltClock
    Aug 16, 2018 at 15:37
  • Also this quote implementations agree not to calculate the width of either element more than once. is intresting because I faced this behavior many times and now I have somehow the anwser .. here is an example with flexbox : stackoverflow.com/questions/51445959/… ... and am sure the same apply to height, so the browser never get back to re-calculate again even if it's trivial for us Aug 16, 2018 at 15:41
2

This is my explanation based on the described above issue so it can be viewed as speculation based on the bounty requirements for "official resources".

When table-layout: fixed is applied, the content no longer dictates the layout, but instead, the browser uses any defined widths from the table's first row to define column widths. If no widths are present on the first row, the column widths are divided equally across the table, regardless of content inside the cells.

In order for a value of fixed to have any effect, the table's width has to be set to something other than auto (the default for the width property) ... source

Once table-layout:fixed; is applied without the parent container having any set width and its own width set in percents it would expand its parent container (whatever that container is body/div/etc) to 100% and take the specified width (in this case 80%) relative to that of the parent.

It would do this since its default purpose is with width being set to make sure its columns width is distributed evenly regardless if there are columns or not. If they aren't any columns it would treat the element as one column. To do that it would still need its width to be relative to its parent (when its own width is set in %).

Example table-layout:fixed is not applied since it has no defined width although it is set in the CSS, table-layout:auto is applied as that is the default:

body {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  position: absolute;
}

.c {
  display: table;
  table-layout: fixed;
  /* width: 80%; */
  outline: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="c">d</div>

Now let's set the width:

body {
  border: 2px solid red;
  height: 100vh;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  position: absolute;
}

.c {
  display: table;
  table-layout: fixed;
  width: 80%;
  outline: 2px solid blue;
}
<div class="c">d</div>

11
  • 1
    sorry to say it but this is somehow wrong ... your first quote won't work because we have no row and no column, we simply have a div with display:table. And you are talking like that the display table is the main container but not, it's the body, so the table-layout:fixed is affecting the parent element ... and of course if we remove absolute position it will be trivial because the body is a block inflow element and a block element has by default width equal to 100%. Sorry but I don't see any logical explanation here (I don't know how you got upvotes by the way). Aug 14, 2018 at 8:11
  • Good feedback. I updated my answer based on my understanding of why this is happening.
    – Akrion
    Aug 14, 2018 at 17:08
  • sorry but this changes nothing, you are simply describing the behavior we all see by saying this Once table-layout:fixed; is applied without the parent container having any set width and its own width set in percents. You don't have any proof for this ...Also by saying It would do this since its default purpose is with width being set to make sure its columns width is distributed evenly. is not logical --> we have no column defined here, only a display:table ... And again the first quote explain the table algorithm and has nothing to do with any parent element. Aug 14, 2018 at 19:09
  • As I said this is my understanding of why it is happening. Just like you I do not have specific proof otherwise this would not have even been a question. Would love to be wrong and learn why it is not as I am suggesting.
    – Akrion
    Aug 14, 2018 at 19:20
  • 1
    @TylerH Added the source
    – Akrion
    Aug 16, 2018 at 14:32
-2

In your second example,

body {
  border   : 2px solid red;
  height   : 100vh;
  margin   : 0;
  padding  : 0;
  position : absolute;

}

.c {
  display : table;
  width   : 80%;
  outline : 2px solid blue;
  /* table-layout : fixed; */
}

You have absolutely positioned the body, so it's taken out of normal flow and it doesn't influence the positioning or sizing of its .c child.

So the width of .c isn't 80% of the body as you might initially expect.

You can however use units like pixels or vw to set the width of .c and the result will be more intuitive, like this.

.c {
  display : table;
  width   : 80vw; 
  outline : 2px solid blue;
  /* width : 80%;  */
  /* table-layout : fixed; */
}

Similarly, when you use table-layout:fixed; your browser uses an algorithm to calculate the width of the table which is similar to using units like pixels or vw to calculate the width for the table.

To quote from the W3C spec

17.5.2.1 Fixed table layout With this (fast) algorithm, the horizontal layout of the table does not depend on the contents of the cells ...

1
  • 1
    sorry but the first part is wrong .. a positioned element is taken out from the flow and will not affect any sibliing element or its parent element but it will still affect and be affected by its child element and 80% is 80% of the body (use fixed values to test) .. And I was clear on the question that using unit like pixel or vw is working fine, the issue is only with %, so the last part of your question adds notihngs Aug 14, 2018 at 8:18

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