40

In Java, we can create an utilities class like this:

final class Utils {
    public static boolean foo() {
        return false;
    }
}

But how to do this in Kotlin?


I try using functions inside object:

object Utils {
    fun foo(): Boolean {
        return false
    }
}

But when call this method from Java code it need to add INSTANCE. Ex: Utils.INSTANCE.foo().


Then I change to declare it as top-level function (without class or object):

@file:JvmName("Utils")
@file:JvmMultifileClass

fun foo(): Boolean {
    return true
}

Then I can call Utils.foo() from Java code. But from Kotlin code I got Unresolved reference compiler error. It only allow be to use foo() function directly (without Utils prefix).


So what is the best approach for declaring utils class in Kotlin?

1
  • This question is getting famous, I have posted an article for it here
    – nhoxbypass
    May 5 '20 at 9:33
36

The last solution you've proposed is actually quite idiomatic in Kotlin - there's no need to scope your function inside anything, top level functions are just fine to use for utilities, in fact, that's what most of the standard library consists of.

You've used the @JvmName annotation the right way too, that's exactly how you're supposed to make these top level functions easily callable for Java users.

Note that you only need @JvmMultifileClass if you are putting your top level functions in different files but still want them to end up grouped in the same class file (again, only for Java users). If you only have one file, or you're giving different names per file, you don't need this annotation.


If for some reason you want the same Utils.foo() syntax in both Java and Kotlin, the solution with an object and then @JvmStatic per method is the way to do that, as already shown by @marianosimone in this answer.

1
  • 2
    Additional info from @Roland answer: Using object for utils in Kotlin does not make any sense. It isn't a singleton, right? Thank you all\
    – nhoxbypass
    Aug 13 '18 at 3:03
31

You'd need to use @JvmStatic for that:

In Kotlin:

object Utils {
    @JvmStatic
    fun foo(): Boolean = true
}

val test = Utils.foo()

In Java:

final boolean test = Utils.foo()
3
  • 2
    Thank you, may be keep the Java style (UtilsClass.utilsFunc()) is not so good with Kotlin, because the UtilsClass part is redundant right?
    – nhoxbypass
    Aug 13 '18 at 3:05
  • 1
    Well, at this point is almost a matter of taste/style. As @zsmb13 pointed out, you can get that syntax in Java by using @JvmName, and use the top level declaration in Kotlin. Some people still prefer the named object even in Kotlin, as it provides a more consistent style across a multi-language project. Aug 13 '18 at 5:56
  • 2
    I'm one of the people who still prefer the named object even in Kotlin. xD
    – nhoxbypass
    Aug 13 '18 at 6:36
4

Note that the util class you used in Java was the only way to supply additional functions there, for anything that did not belong to a particular type or object. Using object for that in Kotlin does not make any sense. It isn't a singleton, right?

The second approach you mentioned is rather the way to go for utility functions. Internally such functions get translated to static ones and as you can see they become the static util classes in Java you are searching for, as you can't have standalone functions in Java without a class or enum. In Kotlin itself however they are just functions.

Some even count utility classes to the anti-patterns. Functions on the other hand make totally sense without a class or object whose name hasn't so much meaning anyway.

2
  • 1
    I'm familiar with the Java style (UtilsClass.utilsFunc()) that group utils functions with relative meaning to the same class (for easy to manage). But it's not a good approach in Kotlin, right?
    – nhoxbypass
    Aug 13 '18 at 3:10
  • 1
    Yes. Whereas in Java you had no other way to deliver such functions, in Kotlin you have. In Java you could at least have static imports to hide the utility class name and then the usage will look the same in Java as in Kotlin. This is probably the better approach then the other way around.
    – Roland
    Aug 13 '18 at 6:00

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