71

Is it possible to use Simple Form (by: Plataformatec) without a model?

https://github.com/plataformatec/simple_form

113

You can use :symbol as the first argument.

<%= simple_form_for :user, url: users_path do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :name, as: :string %>
  ...
<% end %>

It will output something like this:

<form novalidate="novalidate" class="simple_form user" action="/users" accept-charset="UTF-8" method="post">
  ...
  <div class="input string required user_name">
    <label class="string required" for="user_name">
      <abbr title="required">*</abbr> Name
    </label>
    <input class="string required" type="text" name="user[name]" id="user_name" />
  </div>
  ...
</form>
  • 3
    @toxaq Maybe that's not a good example. You can use f.input :name, :as => :string and generate your usual form with label, hints, etc. – htanata Jul 20 '12 at 23:48
  • 8
    Oddly that's exactly what I'm trying to do and having no success. Your example gives an undefined method 'name?' for nil:NilClass for me at least. – toxaq Jul 21 '12 at 0:11
  • 10
    This option still uses a model under the covers. The symbol should match a model name, it will resolve to a model and create a new one and use it on every field, so the properties used in the form fields should actually exists in the model. – Miguel Madero Jul 2 '13 at 19:32
  • 13
    I don't understand why this is the accepted answer, because the answer is just wrong. – Phillipp Sep 16 '14 at 14:27
  • 1
    Yeah, I think I missed the point previously, and I've written a better answer as comment. I've updated the answer so it does what simple_form is supposed to do. – htanata Nov 10 '14 at 17:37
16

Unfortunately simple_form relies on using a model. Essentially it would be nice to have something like simple_form_tag and input_tag methods equivalent to their rails *_tag helpers. Until then, there's an easy work around.

Use a symbol instead of the class in the form and pass the value explicitly to prevent simple_form from trying to access the model properties.

<%= simple_form_for :user, :url => '/users' do |f| %>
  <%= f.text_field :name, input_html: { value: nil } %>
<% end %>

This will avoid the undefined method 'name' for User error.

  • 2
    This worked for me: <%= f.input :create_key, input_html: {value: nil}, required: true, hint: "by invite only, see email for key" %> – codenoob Nov 9 '14 at 17:44
  • 1
    If working with a collection, use selected instead of value in order to avoid the undefined method 'name' for Model error – fkoessler Nov 2 '15 at 10:17
9

You can also use fields outside the model within a form model, with simple_fields_for like this:

<%= simple_form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :name %>

  <%= simple_fields_for :no_model_fields do |n| %>
    <%= n.input :other_field %>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

This is simple and practical solution, because you can create different kind of fields from different models or without using models

4

You could also pass a :symbol instead of @object as argument for simple_form_for.

<%= simple_form_for :email, :url => '/post_email' do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :subject, :as => :string %>
<% end %>

Which would output:

<form method="post" class="simple_form email" action="/post_email" accept-charset="UTF-8">
  ...
  <input type="text" size="30" name="email[subject]" id="email_subject">
</form>

Please be aware of following draw-backs:

  • You won't be able to take advantage of automatic model validation
  • Need to explicitly define :url and the type of each input
  • 3
    This option still uses a model under the covers. The symbol should match a model name, it will resolve to a model and create a new one and use it on every field, so the properties used in the form fields should actually exists in the model. – Miguel Madero Jul 2 '13 at 19:33
4

All of the methods above still leave you with form data nested inside of "user" or whatever symbol that you pass as the first argument. That's annoying.

To mimic simple_form's style/benefits, but remove the object/symbol dependency and the forced data nesting, you can create a partial.

HAML examples:

form view:

= form_tag("path/to/action", method: "POST") do
    = render "path/to/partial/field", type: "string", required: true, item: "first_name"

field partial:

- required_string = required ? "required" : ""
%div{class: "input #{type} #{required_string} #{item}"}
  %label{class: "#{type} #{required_string}", for: "#{item}"}
    - if required
      %abbr{title: "required"}
        *
    = t("application.#{item}")
  %input{name: "#{item}",                                                     |
    placeholder: t("application.#{item}"),                                    |
    type: "#{type}",                                                          |
    required: required,                                                       |
    "aria-required" => "#{required}" }

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