226

What's the best way to do following:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE created >= today;

Note: created is a datetime field.

10 Answers 10

405
SELECT * FROM users WHERE created >= CURDATE();

But I think you mean created < today

You can compare datetime with date, for example: SELECT NOW() < CURDATE() gives 0, SELECT NOW() = CURDATE() gives 1.

2
  • 16
    CURDATE() return only date not time Commented Mar 3, 2011 at 14:54
  • 23
    @n00b how do you have users who are created in the future..? interesting =) I was using this to see if a post had expired yet. Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 3:52
94
SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE  DATE(myDate) = DATE(NOW())

Read more: https://www.tomjepson.co.uk/mysql-select-from-table-where-date-today

4
  • 8
    Maybe I'm missing something, but with DATETIME types, the CURDATE() solution doesn't work. This does. Commented Oct 18, 2013 at 8:42
  • plus this takes a lot of time as there is overhead of converting DATETIME to date via the DATE() function and then comparing with the where condition.
    – roopunk
    Commented Aug 14, 2014 at 9:48
  • 1
    Do not use functions on columns, it makes the query to ignore index, causing slow queries. Check my answer for alternative approach stackoverflow.com/a/42365426/4311336 Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 13:00
  • "equal or greater than today" - how does your answer resolve that? How could it return any row where myDate is in the future?
    – Nico Haase
    Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 12:36
47
SELECT * FROM users WHERE created >= NOW();

if the column is datetime type.

4
  • 1
    i mean today not now :D i need today like 2011-03-03 not 2011-03-03 14:02:02
    – n00b
    Commented Mar 3, 2011 at 14:54
  • @n00b: it will returns rows greater than today don't worry if the time is included Commented Mar 3, 2011 at 14:57
  • 4
    lets say it's 2011-02-02 14:02:02 - users that have been created at 10:02:02 wouldn't be returned in your version even though they were created "today" :)
    – n00b
    Commented Mar 3, 2011 at 15:02
  • @n00b: Lol ya, no users would ever be returned, if only we could stop time. Commented Dec 7, 2012 at 0:52
31

Answer marked is misleading. The question stated is DateTime, but stated what was needed was just CURDATE().

The shortest and correct answer to this is:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE created >= CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
0
18

If 'created' is datetime type

SELECT * FROM users WHERE created < DATE_ADD(CURDATE(), INTERVAL 1 DAY);

CURDATE() means also '2013-05-09 00:00:00'

3
  • Thanks for this. I actually needed DATE_SUB (used in the same way), but this put me on the right path. Commented Nov 5, 2015 at 12:29
  • This will not return data where date contains 0s in time, i.e '2013-05-09 00:00:00' will be missed out Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 13:30
  • "equal or greater than today" - how does your answer resolve that? How could it return any row where myDate is in the future?
    – Nico Haase
    Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 12:37
15

If the column have index and a function is applied on the column then index doesn't work and full table scan occurs, causing really slow query.

Bad Query; This would ignore index on the column date_time

select * from users
where Date(date_time) > '2010-10-10'

To utilize index on column created of type datetime comparing with today/current date, the following method can be used.

Solution for OP:

select * from users
where created > CONCAT(CURDATE(), ' 23:59:59')

Sample to get data for today:

select * from users
where 
    created >= CONCAT(CURDATE(), ' 00:00:00') AND
    created <= CONCAT(CURDATE(), ' 23:59:59')

Or use BETWEEN for short

select * from users 
where created BETWEEN 
      CONCAT(CURDATE(), ' 00:00:00') AND CONCAT(CURDATE(), ' 23:59:59')

Tip: If you have to do a lot of calculation or queries on dates as well as time, then it's very useful to save date and time in separate columns. (Divide & Conquer)

3
SELECT * FROM users WHERE created >= now()
1
  • This won't return the records before this moment from today.
    – gsziszi
    Commented Mar 15, 2020 at 9:55
1

The below code worked for me.

declare @Today date

Set @Today=getdate() --date will equal today    

Select *

FROM table_name
WHERE created <= @Today
-2
SELECT * FROM table_name WHERE CONCAT( SUBSTRING(json_date, 11, 4 ) ,  '-', SUBSTRING( json_date, 7, 2 ) ,  '-', SUBSTRING(json_date, 3, 2 ) ) >= NOW();

json_date ["05/11/2011"]

2
  • This is a very raw solution Commented May 26, 2015 at 9:07
  • Please add some explanation to your answer such that others can learn from it. Where does json_date come from?
    – Nico Haase
    Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 12:37
-6

you can return all rows and than use php datediff function inside an if statement, although that will put extra load on the server.

if(dateDiff(date("Y/m/d"), $row['date']) <=0 ){    
}else{    
echo " info here";    
}
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  • 5
    this is very slow compared to the database select Commented May 26, 2015 at 9:10
  • This won't work if the OP won't use PHP after all
    – Nico Haase
    Commented Jun 21, 2023 at 12:38

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