38

Given this code:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection("..."))
{
    conn.Open();
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = "...";
        using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                // ...
            }
        }
    }
}

I'm used to writing try/catch/finally blocks for my data access, however, I'm being exposed to "using" which seems like a much simpler method of doing this. However, I'm trying to figure out how to catch exceptions that may occur.

Could you please give me an example of how you'd catch exceptions?

Edited to add:

I'm being led to believe that "using" is a replacement for my try/catch/finally blocks. I understand that using doesn't catch exceptions. So how is this a replacement?

0

7 Answers 7

65

using isn't designed to catch exceptions; it's designed to give you an easy way to wrap a try/finally around an object that needs to be disposed. If you need to catch and handle exceptions then you'll need to expand it into a full try/catch/finally or put a containing try/catch around the whole thing.


To answer your edit (is using a replacement for try/catch/finally?) then no, it isn't. Most of the time when using a disposable resource you aren't going to handle the exception there and then because there's normally nothing useful you can do. So it provides a convenient way to just ensure that the resource is cleaned up irrespective of what you're trying to do works or not.

Typically code that deals with disposable resources is working at too low a level to decide what the correct action is on failure, so the exception is left to propagate to the caller who can decide what action to take (e.g. retry, fail, log, etc.). The only place where you'd tend to use a catch block with a disposable resource is if you're going to translate the exception (which is, I assume, what your data access layer is doing).

1
  • "Most of the time when using a disposable resource you aren't going to handle the exception there and then because there's normally nothing useful you can do." - yes, but using blocks are also (abused) for things like logging, writing structured files, and more besides - so being able to get exception details in the subject's Dispose method does have some (if ill-advised) utility.
    – Dai
    Jul 30, 2021 at 23:50
16

This...

using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Customers"))
{
    cmd.CommandTimeout = 60000;
    ...
}

...is almost semantically-identical (i.e. syntactical-sugar) for this:

{
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Customers");
    try
    {
        cmd.CommandTimeout = 60000;
        ...
    }
    finally
    {
        if (cmd is IDisposable disposable)
        {
            disposable.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Note that:

  • The cmd local cannot be reassigned, this is one of the few cases where C# has "readonly locals" (along with foreach).
  • The outer braces ({ and }) define an anonymous scope (also known as a compound statement or just a "block") which limits the lexical scope of cmd so it cannot be referenced by name after it has been disposed (but you can still alias it if you really wanted to).
  • While the compiler will perform the "is-IDisposable" check at compile-time (otherwise the usingstatement will not compile), a hidden implicit conversion toIDisposable is necessary in case the subject (cmd) only _explicitly_ implements IDisposableinstead of via a publicvoid Dispose()` method.

So when people are telling you that "using" is a replacement for try/catch/finally they are implying that you should use the long-hand form but add in your catch block:

var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Customers");
try
{
    cmd.CommandTimeout = 60000;
    ...
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    ...//your stuff here
}
finally
{
    if (cmd != null)
        cmd.Dispose();
}
1
  • I think the initialization of cmd needs to be inside the try block. Moreover, your finally block can be further simplified by Null propagation: cmd?.Dispose();
    – Bhu
    Jun 26, 2022 at 17:08
14

Wrap all the using statements into a try/catch. Like everyone else has said, using is for cleaning up classes that implement the IDisposable interface

try
{

 using (var conn = new SqlConnection("..."))
 {
    conn.Open();
    using (var cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
    {
        cmd.CommandText = "...";
        using (var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                // ...
            }
        }
    }
 }
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
//Handle, log, rethrow exception
}
4
  • How is this better that try/catch/finally and calling dispose in my finally block?
    – GregD
    Feb 5, 2009 at 22:45
  • 1
    Erik, why would you call dispose in the finally block? When you can use the using statements? If you use the finally block then you have to declare the objects outside the try block... Feb 5, 2009 at 23:08
  • Internally that's the same IL the using statement will generate Charles. It's really just syntactical candy. Feb 6, 2009 at 14:36
  • At first I couldnt think that solution, tried writing "try" clause in "using" paranthesises, then of course compiler said wtf are u doing :D .Then came to page . And said "Oh my God how couldnt think like that" Mar 17, 2015 at 10:53
7

If you want to catch exceptions there you probably should go back to using try/catch/finally. Just put the .Dispose() calls in the finally block.

3
  • 1
    He can wrap the using into a try/catch-block. If an error is caught, Dispose will be called (if it exists) before entering the catch.
    – Leonidas
    Feb 5, 2009 at 23:17
  • 2
    That's true, but then you've got one more level of indentation and the using statement is not that convenient anymore. I'd prefer to just have the one try/catch/finally handle everything (but that's a minor style thing). Feb 5, 2009 at 23:33
  • 1
    But even with simple error handling, it can be easy to write code that looks like it calls Dispose() but fails in some cases. using() at least ensures it is cleaned up correctly, even if it makes granular exception handling nearly impossible.
    – binki
    Jan 14, 2015 at 16:06
6

Using statements have nothing to do with Exceptions. Using blocks just insure that Dispose is called on the object in the using block, when it exits that block. I.E:

using(SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(conStr))
{
   //use conn
}//Dispose is called here on conn.

If opening the connection raises an exception (or anything else in that block for that matter) it will still bubble to the top and will be like any other unhanded exception.

5

You can still catch (or ignore) exceptions exactly as you would have previously. The point is that you no longer need to worry about disposing of the database connection.

ie, If your application requires that you trap exceptions for some other reason (eg, logging) then go ahead, but you no longer need to do so if you only want to dispose of the database connection:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(...))
{
    // do your db work here
    // whatever happens the connection will be safely disposed
}

If you want to catch the exception for some other reason, you can still do so:

try
{
    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(...))
    {
        // do your db work here
        // whatever happens the connection will be safely disposed
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // do your stuff here (eg, logging)
    // nb: the connection will already have been disposed at this point
}
finally
{
    // if you need it
}
0
0

Put into a try catch block the using block/s. Their implicit finally statements devoted to their objects disposition will be executed before the outer block catch statement and its content.

2
  • How is this different from the other answers, e.g. the one from Chuck Conway? Aug 22, 2020 at 9:57
  • it explains that the implicit "finally" statements will be executed before the outer block "catch" statement. I think this is an important emphasys and I think it was implicitly requested in the initial question even if not clearly expressed, or at least I grasped this need Aug 24, 2020 at 11:13

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