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In Javascript not every data is an object. There exist a few primitive types, like strings, numbers and boolean which are not objects. For each of this types there exists a constructor which outputs an object with similar behaviour: Number, String and Boolean. To confuse matters, one actually can call methods on primitive types - they will be converted to the corresponding objects during this operation, and then converted back. For instance one can do

var a = 4.1324;
a.toFixed(1) // outputs 4.1

Yet if you try to compare primitive types and objects with strict equality, the difference shows up

var a = new Number(4);
var b = 4;
a === b; // False!!!
typeof a; // 'object'
typeof b; // 'number'

Actually of one tries to compare objects, they turn out to be different anyway:

var a = new Number(4);
var b = new Number(4);
a === b; // False!!!

(From a conceptual point of view I sort of understand the distinction. Objects can have additional properties, hence the should not compare to equal unless they are actually the same. So if we want to have 4 === 4 we need to use a type which is not an object. But this dilemma is faced by any sufficiently dynamic programming language, yet Javscript is the only one I know where there are two types - one objectful and one not - for numbers or strings.)

What is the advantage of keeping two separate representations for numbers, strings and booleans? In what context could one need the distinction between primitive types and objects?

  • 1
    Performance, I'd think. Unboxed types are much cheaper to work with. – Marcus Frödin Mar 3 '11 at 15:47
  • 1
    Java also has primitive types (int, double) and object wrappers (Integer, Double). – Pointy Mar 3 '11 at 15:54
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    +1 for asking a serious question regarding pros/cons rather than just ranting against JS design as we tend to see on SO occasionally. – Matt Molnar Mar 3 '11 at 16:21
6

What is the advantage of keeping two separate representations for numbers, strings and booleans?

Performance

In what context could one need the distinction between primitive types and objects?

Coersion comes to mind. 0 == false while new Number(0) != false

So for instance:

var a = new Boolean(false);
if(a) {
  //this code runs
}

but

var a = false;
if(a) {
  //this code never runs
}

You can read more about coersion here: http://webreflection.blogspot.com/2010/10/javascript-coercion-demystified.html

  • An article I wrote on types in JavaScript - wp.me/1xCD0. – rahulmohan May 8 '11 at 15:35
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    Note: today in Chrome, new Number(0) == false – c24w Feb 21 '13 at 10:54
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    @c24w that has always been the case, not just today. This answer is also wrong in general, the object versions are needed for prototype extensions and boxing (although even that is useless under ES5 strict). E.g. Number.prototype.negate = function(){return -this} (3).negate() === -3 – Esailija Jul 4 '13 at 13:37
  • @Esailija: fair enough! Good point about the prototype extensions too. Would be great if you wrote an answer for future readers :) – c24w Jul 4 '13 at 14:23
0

What is the advantage of keeping two separate representations

As you point out you can call methods on unboxed values too (a.toFixed(1)). But that does cause a conversion in other words an instantiation of a new boxed object (probably) every time you call such a method.

So there is a performance penalty right there. If you explicitly create a boxed Number and then call its methods no further instance need to be created.

So I think the reason for having both is much historical. JavaScript started out as a simple interpreted language meaning performance was bad meaning any (simple) way they could increase performance was important, such as making numbers and strings primitive by default.

Java has boxed vs. unboxed values as well.

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