3

I am currently working with a smallish dataset (about 9 million rows). Unfortunately, most of the entries are strings, and even with coercion to categories, the frame sits at a few GB in memory.

What I would like to do is compare each row with other rows and do a straight comparison of contents. For example, given

   A   B     C      D
0 cat blue  old Saturday
1 dog red   old Saturday

I would like to compute

      d_A   d_B   d_C   d_D
0, 0  True  True  True  True
0, 1  False False True  True
1, 0  False False True  True
1, 1  True  True  True  True

Obviously, combinatorial explosion will preclude a comparison of every record with every other record. So we can instead use blocking, by applying groupby, say on column A.

My question is, is there a a way to do this in either pandas or dask, that is faster than the following sequence:

  1. Group by index
  2. Outer join each group to itself to produce pairs
  3. dataframe.apply comparison function on each row of pairs

For reference, assume I have access to a good number of cores (hundreds), and about 200G of memory.

2
  • do you need to know if there is a complete equality between the rows or do you need to know where they differ (as in the output DataFrame you provided)? – moshevi Aug 14 '18 at 17:19
  • I need to know where they differ. – Fred Byrd Aug 15 '18 at 20:14
3

The solution turned out to be using numpy in place of step 3). While we cannot create an outer join of every row, we can group by values in column A and create smaller groups to outer join.

The trick is then to use numpy.equal.outer(df1, df2).ravel() When dataframes are passed as inputs to a numpy function in this way, the result is a much faster (at least 30x) vectorized result. For example:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame
   A   B     C      D
0 cat blue  old Saturday
1 dog red   old Saturday

>>> result = pd.DataFrame(columns=["A", "B", "C", "D"], 
                            index=pd.MultiIndex.from_product([df.index, df.index]))
>>> result["A"] = np.equal.outer(df["A"], df["A"]).ravel()
>>> result
        A     B     C     D
0, 0  True   NaN   NaN   NaN  
0, 1  False  NaN   NaN   NaN  
1, 0  False  NaN   NaN   NaN  
1, 1  True   NaN   NaN   NaN  

You can repeat for each column, or just automate the process with columnwise apply on result.

1
  1. You might consider phrasing your problem as a join operation
  2. You might consider using categoricals to reduce memory use
1
  • Fyi, I think the second point has already been considered, i.e. even with coercion to categories, the frame sits at a few GB in memory. – jpp Aug 21 '18 at 14:12

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