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I am very new to r and want to calculate the percentage of a variable based on two other variables. A simplified version of my data is:

choice g score
1 M .10
1 M .20
1 F .15
1 F .15
1 M .20
2 M .05
2 M .05
2 M .15
2 F .20

The result I am looking for is:

choice score %g(M) %g(F)
1 .10 .333 0
1 .15 0 1
1 .20 .667
2 .05 .667 0
2 .15 .333 0 
2 .20 0 1

I hope this is clear. Any help would be appreciated! Thank you.

2
  • 3
    "I hope this is clear" No sorry, this is not clear to me. For choice = 1 and score = 0.10 why is the percentage of M 0.333? Can you elaborate on the rules for calculating the percentages. What happens if you have duplicate rows (e.g. for choice = 1, g = F and score = 0.15)? Aug 14, 2018 at 23:11
  • Distinguishing between proportions that add to 1 and percentages that add to 100 would (have) help(ed) here. (Out of context a percentage of 0.333 can surely only mean 0.333%.)
    – Nick Cox
    Nov 14, 2019 at 16:34

2 Answers 2

1

A solution using the tidyverse package. The key is to count the row number tiwce for different group columns, calcualte the percentage, and then spread the data frame.

library(tidyverse)

dat2 <- dat %>%
  group_by(choice, g) %>%
  add_count() %>%
  group_by(choice, g, score) %>%
  add_count() %>%
  mutate(Percentage = nn/n) %>%
  select(-n, -nn) %>%
  distinct() %>%
  spread(g, Percentage, fill = 0) %>%
  select(choice, score, `%g(M)` = M, `%g(F)` = F) %>%
  ungroup()
dat2
# # A tibble: 6 x 4
#   choice score `%g(M)` `%g(F)`
#    <int> <dbl>   <dbl>   <dbl>
# 1      1  0.1    0.333       0
# 2      1  0.15   0           1
# 3      1  0.2    0.667       0
# 4      2  0.05   0.667       0
# 5      2  0.15   0.333       0
# 6      2  0.2    0           1

Or the following, which is more concise than my previous solution.

dat2 <- dat %>%
  count(choice, g, score) %>%
  group_by(choice, g) %>%
  mutate(Percentage = n/sum(n)) %>%
  select(-n) %>%
  spread(g, Percentage, fill = 0) %>%
  select(choice, score, `%g(M)` = M, `%g(F)` = F) %>%
  ungroup()
dat2
# # A tibble: 6 x 4
#    choice score `%g(M)` `%g(F)`
#    <int> <dbl>   <dbl>   <dbl>
# 1      1  0.1    0.333       0
# 2      1  0.15   0           1
# 3      1  0.2    0.667       0
# 4      2  0.05   0.667       0
# 5      2  0.15   0.333       0
# 6      2  0.2    0           1

DATA

dat <- read.table(text = "choice g score
1 M .10
                  1 M .20
                  1 F .15
                  1 F .15
                  1 M .20
                  2 M .05
                  2 M .05
                  2 M .15
                  2 F .20",
                  header = TRUE, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
1
  • 1
    Wow, well done for reverse-engineering the rules. Poor question. Excellent answer. +1 Aug 15, 2018 at 0:33
1

Here is a solution using data.table. Basically, OP is looking for something like a contingency table in percentage terms. The table function will come in useful here:

#convert into a factor
dat[, g := as.factor(g)]

#count number of M/F for each choice and g
dat[, nMF := .N, by=.(choice, g)]

#tabulate the observations and divide by number of M/F
dat[, as.list(table(g) / nMF), by=.(choice, score)]

output:

   choice score F         M
1:      1  0.10 0 0.3333333
2:      1  0.20 0 0.6666667
3:      1  0.15 1 0.0000000
4:      2  0.05 0 0.6666667
5:      2  0.15 0 0.3333333
6:      2  0.20 1 0.0000000

data:

library(data.table)
dat <- fread("choice g score
1 M .10
1 M .20
1 F .15
1 F .15
1 M .20
2 M .05
2 M .05
2 M .15
2 F .20")

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