1

I'm using predict.lm(fit, newdata=newdata, interval="prediction") to get predictions and their prediction intervals (PI) for new observations. Now I would like to aggregate (sum and mean) these predictions and their PI's based on an additional variable (i.e. a spatial aggregation on the zip code level of predictions for single households).

I learned from StackExchange, that you cannot aggregate the prediction intervals of single predictions just by aggregating the limits of the prediction intervals. The post is very helpful to understand why this can't be done, but I have a hard time translating this bit into actual code. The answer reads:

Glen_b

Here's a reproducible example:

library(dplyr)
set.seed(123)

data(iris)

#Split dataset in training and prediction set
smp_size <- floor(0.75 * nrow(iris))
train_ind <- sample(seq_len(nrow(iris)), size = smp_size)
train <- iris[train_ind, ]
pred <- iris[-train_ind, ]

#Fit regression model
fit1 <- lm(Petal.Width ~ Petal.Length, data=train)

#Fit multiple linear regression model
fit2 <- lm(Petal.Width ~ Petal.Length + Sepal.Width + Sepal.Length, data=train)

#Predict Pedal.Width for new data incl prediction intervals for each prediction
predictions1<-predict(fit1, newdata=pred, interval="prediction")
predictions2<-predict(fit2, newdata=pred, interval="prediction")

# Aggregate data by summing predictions for species
#NOT correct for prediction intervals
predictions_agg1<-data.frame(predictions1,Species=pred$Species) %>%
  group_by(Species) %>%
  summarise_all(funs(sum,mean))

predictions_agg2<-data.frame(predictions2,Species=pred$Species) %>%
  group_by(Species) %>%
  summarise_all(funs(sum,mean))

I couldn't find a good tutorial or package which describes how to properly aggregate predictions and their PI's in R when using predict.lm(). Is there something out there? Would highly appreciate if you could point me in the right direction on how to do this in R.

2

Your question is closely related to a thread I answered 2 years ago: linear model with `lm`: how to get prediction variance of sum of predicted values. It provides an R implementation of Glen_b's answer on Cross Validated. Thanks for quoting that Cross Validated thread; I didn't know it; perhaps I can leave a comment there linking the Stack Overflow thread.

I have polished my original answer, wrapping up line-by-line code cleanly into easy-to-use functions lm_predict and agg_pred. Solving your question is then simplified to applying those functions by group.

Consider the iris example in your question, and the second model fit2 for demonstration.

set.seed(123)
data(iris)

#Split dataset in training and prediction set
smp_size <- floor(0.75 * nrow(iris))
train_ind <- sample(seq_len(nrow(iris)), size = smp_size)
train <- iris[train_ind, ]
pred <- iris[-train_ind, ]

#Fit multiple linear regression model
fit2 <- lm(Petal.Width ~ Petal.Length + Sepal.Width + Sepal.Length, data=train)

We split pred by group Species, then apply lm_predict (with diag = FALSE) on all sub data frames.

oo <- lapply(split(pred, pred$Species), lm_predict, lmObject = fit2, diag = FALSE)

To use agg_pred we need to specify a weight vector, whose length equals to the number of data. We can determine this by consulting the length of fit in each oo[[i]]:

n <- lengths(lapply(oo, "[[", 1))
#setosa versicolor  virginica 
#    11         13         14 

If aggregation operation is sum, we do

w <- lapply(n, rep.int, x = 1)
#List of 3
# $ setosa    : num [1:11] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
# $ versicolor: num [1:13] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
# $ virginica : num [1:14] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...

SUM <- Map(agg_pred, w, oo)
SUM[[1]]  ## result for the first group, for example
#$mean
#[1] 2.499728
#
#$var
#[1] 0.1271554
#
#$CI
#   lower    upper 
#1.792908 3.206549 
#
#$PI
#   lower    upper 
#0.999764 3.999693 

sapply(SUM, "[[", "CI")  ## some nice presentation for CI, for example
#        setosa versicolor virginica
#lower 1.792908   16.41526  26.55839
#upper 3.206549   17.63953  28.10812

If aggregation operation is average, we rescale w by n and call agg_pred.

w <- mapply("/", w, n)
#List of 3
# $ setosa    : num [1:11] 0.0909 0.0909 0.0909 0.0909 0.0909 ...
# $ versicolor: num [1:13] 0.0769 0.0769 0.0769 0.0769 0.0769 ...
# $ virginica : num [1:14] 0.0714 0.0714 0.0714 0.0714 0.0714 ...

AVE <- Map(agg_pred, w, oo)
AVE[[2]]  ## result for the second group, for example
#$mean
#[1] 1.3098
#
#$var
#[1] 0.0005643196
#
#$CI
#    lower    upper 
#1.262712 1.356887 
#
#$PI
#   lower    upper 
#1.189562 1.430037 

sapply(AVE, "[[", "PI")  ## some nice presentation for CI, for example
#          setosa versicolor virginica
#lower 0.09088764   1.189562  1.832255
#upper 0.36360845   1.430037  2.072496

This is great! Thank you so much! There is one thing I forgot to mention: in my actual application I need to sum ~300,000 predictions which would create a full variance-covariance matrix which is about ~700GB in size. Do you have any idea if there is a computationally more efficient way to directly get to the sum of the variance-covariance matrix?

Use the fast_agg_pred function provided in the revision of the original Q & A. Let's start it all over.

set.seed(123)
data(iris)

#Split dataset in training and prediction set
smp_size <- floor(0.75 * nrow(iris))
train_ind <- sample(seq_len(nrow(iris)), size = smp_size)
train <- iris[train_ind, ]
pred <- iris[-train_ind, ]

#Fit multiple linear regression model
fit2 <- lm(Petal.Width ~ Petal.Length + Sepal.Width + Sepal.Length, data=train)

## list of new data
newdatlist <- split(pred, pred$Species)

n <- sapply(newdatlist, nrow)
#setosa versicolor  virginica 
#    11         13         14 

If aggregation operation is sum, we do

w <- lapply(n, rep.int, x = 1)
SUM <- mapply(fast_agg_pred, w, newdatlist,
              MoreArgs = list(lmObject = fit2, alpha = 0.95),
              SIMPLIFY = FALSE)

If aggregation operation is average, we do

w <- mapply("/", w, n)
AVE <- mapply(fast_agg_pred, w, newdatlist,
              MoreArgs = list(lmObject = fit2, alpha = 0.95),
              SIMPLIFY = FALSE)

Note that we can't use Map in this case as we need to provide more arguments to fast_agg_pred. Use mapply in this situation, with MoreArgs and SIMPLIFY.

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