12

I'm getting the "The following untracked working tree files would be overwritten by checkout...please move or remove them before you switch branches" error.

The common fix appears to be git clean

When I type that in, I get no error, but nothing happens. And when I go to check out another branch, I just get the same error as above.

Any reason as to why git clean would do absolutely nothing?

UPDATE:

More info. git -n and git -f do exactly the same...nothing.

6
  • If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set to false, git clean will refuse to delete files or directories unless given -f, -n or -i Aug 15 '18 at 21:06
  • 1
    @WilliamPursell Thanks. I updated my question. Alas, -f and -n also result in nothing happening.
    – DA.
    Aug 15 '18 at 21:12
  • 1
    what does git status show?
    – Spacemoose
    Aug 15 '18 at 21:18
  • 3
    From which directory are you running git clean? It will only clean the current working directory and below. Aug 15 '18 at 21:22
  • 4
    Are those files being ignored? Did you try adding -x? Aug 15 '18 at 21:33
14

If you want to clean untracked files, use the below command. But, take care before running this, as it will wipe your working area, index, HEAD.

git reset --hard

I think you are having untracked directories or ignored files(build files) of gitignore in your working area. you can remove them by the below command.

git clean -dfx

-d

Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files. If an untracked directory is managed by a different Git repository, it is not removed by default. Use -f option twice if you really want to remove such a directory.

-f --force

If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set to false, git clean will refuse to delete files or directories unless given -f, -n or -i. Git will refuse to delete directories with .git sub directory or file unless a second -f is given.

-x

Don’t use the standard ignore rules read from .gitignore (per directory) > and $GIT_DIR/info/exclude, but do still use the ignore rules given with -e > options. This allows removing all untracked files, including build products. This can be used (possibly in conjunction with git reset) to create a pristine working directory to test a clean build.

For more information git clean

10

Like other comments have specified, you do need to add the -f flag.

But you may be having problems not because you aren't specifying --force, but rather because you're in a different subdirectory.

for example, if I have git repository residing in /myrepo/.git

and untracked files in subdirectory /myrepo/untracked/file.txt,

but my terminal's current working directory is /myrepo/src/.

git clean -fd will not work. You need to cd to the project root before running the command.

TL;DR: git clean -fd apparently only cleans untracked files and directories at and below your terminal's current working directory.

1
  • 1
    thanks! this was my issue (when working in a yarn workspace mono repo)
    – Norfeldt
    Nov 16 '21 at 7:21
2

try to Use

git clean -fd

Try stashing of the changes,

git stash

if you want to beck all the changes use,

git stash apply
2

This is possibly not what happened in OPs case. However I had the same problem. In my case the directory that wasn't cleaned was a submodule I added, but I subsequently git reset it. I had to remove all traces of it from .gitmodules, .git/config and .git/modules/<path to submodule> for git clean to remove it even if git status recognized it as untracked.

2
  • I was not able to run git clean (likely due to git module issues); I ended up doing: "rm -rf <folders containing the files>; git reset --hard"
    – Qiang Li
    Sep 3 '20 at 1:44
  • In my case I moved some submodules using git mv. I couldn't find anything in .gitmodules or .git that looked like it should actually be removed, so I just removed those directories manually. Very annoying.
    – Max
    Dec 14 '20 at 15:04
0

It seems to me you need to specify -n or -f. From the man pages:

OPTIONS

   -f, --force
       If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set to false, git clean will refuse to delete files or
       directories unless given -f, -n or -i. Git will refuse to delete directories with .git sub directory or file unless a second
       -f is given.
1
  • 1
    I updated my question. Alas, -f and -n also result in nothing happening.
    – DA.
    Aug 15 '18 at 21:11

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