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In Postman, after each request I execute this sequence of code almost every time in the test:

var jsonData = pm.response.json();
// Do something useful with jsonData variable

Is it possible to put this declaration inside the collection test so that I can use it in each of my request test without having to rewrite it every time ?

Currently, if I set it inside my collection test and then try to use the variable jsonData in my request test, the variable doesn't exist.

I could set it in a global variable or environment variable I guess, but this seems not to be the right way.

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    Something like this feature request ? – Ghasem Naddaf Aug 16 '18 at 7:49
  • My understanding is as follows. I would say this has to do with scope. The variable jsonData is created and dies for every request. The contents of pm.response.json() are different for each request, and it therefore must be recreated for each request. More in no, that is not possible. – Henke May 4 at 14:43
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According to Postman data variables as JSON should be used as global/environment variables:

The Collection Runner lets you import a CSV or a JSON file, and then use the values from the data file inside HTTP requests and scripts. We call these ’data variables’.

To use them inside Postman, follow the same syntax as environment or global variables.

So use pm.environment.set() or pm.globals.set() for your jsonData

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  • This is not an answer to the posted question. – Henke Jan 27 at 15:59
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Is it possible to put this declaration inside the collection test so that I can use it in each of my request test without having to rewrite it every time ?

My answer: no, that is not possible.
Read on if you want to know how I came to this conclusion.


I made a simple little experiment. You can replicate it as explained below.

I have created a Postman collection by the name TestCollection.
It can be downloaded and saved to your local drive from:
https://schulze.000webhostapp.com/postman/variables/TestCollection.pm_coll.json

Then - from the Postman desktop app (not the chrome extension) - the TestCollection can be imported as shown in the figure below.

Import the collection TestCollection.


To open the collection window, click on the three mini circles next to the collection name (tooltip: View more actions). Then click Edit as in the figure below.

Open the collection window of TestCollection.


As shown below, click on the Tests tab.
The JavaScript snippet for the test of the collection is:

pm.test('Collection Test', function () {
  pm.response.to.have.status(200);
});
console.log('Hello from Collection Test!');
const jsonData = pm.response.json();
console.log('Collection Test says URL = ' + jsonData.url);

In this case, the // Do something useful with jsonData variable of the question is to print the URL of the request in the console.

Collection test prints the URL of the request in the console.


Next click on the TestCollection-Request ...

Open the TestCollection-Request.

... and then on its Tests tab as shown in the figure below.
(The GET request is https://postman-echo.com/get. - Click the image to make it larger.)
The JavaScript snippet for the test of the request is:

pm.test('Request Test', function () {
  pm.response.to.have.status(200);
});
console.log('Hi from Request Test.');
const jsonData = pm.response.json();
console.log('Request Test says user-agent = ' +
    jsonData.headers['user-agent']);

The // Do something useful with jsonData variable of the question is now to print the user-agent of the request in the console.

Click the blue Send button ...

The TestCollection-Request - click Send.


... and then open the Console in the bottom left corner.

The output in the console shows that the collection test runs before the request test.

The console shows that the collection test runs before the
request test.


To answer the question asked, in the second JS code snippet (belonging to the request) we should comment out the declaration (and initialization) of the jsonData variable, and then see what happens when the request is sent again.
The result of doing this is shown the figure below.

The value of CollectionVar has changed to Some New Value.

As the figure shows, this results in a ReferenceError: jsonData is not defined.

I think it is rather obvious what is going on here. Once the scope of the second JS code snippet becomes alive, the scope of the first JS code snippet (belonging to the collection) is already dead. This means that - in the second code snippet - the jsonData variable was never declared.


To confirm this result, consider what will happen if - in the second code snippet only - we (uncomment row 5 and) rename the jsonData variable to say otherJson.
See the result in the figure below.

The value of CollectionVar has changed to Some New Value.

Confirmed! - Even though jsonData of the collection snippet and otherJson of the request snippet contain the exact same data, they are still two completely different and unrelated JavaScript variables belonging to two completely different and unrelated scopes. Think of the two code snipppets being in two different files, if that helps.


References:

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