I am learning functional programming in C++. My intention is to pass a non generic function as argument. I know about the template method, however I would like to restrict the function signature as part of the API design. I worked out 4 different methods example on cpp.sh:

// Example program
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <functional>

typedef int(functor_type)(int);


int by_forwarding(functor_type &&x)  {
    return x(1);
}

int functor_by_value(functor_type x) {
    return x(1);
}

int std_func_by_value(std::function<functor_type> x) {
    return x(1);
}

int std_func_by_forwarding(std::function<functor_type> &&x) {
    return x(1);
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << functor_by_value([](int a){return a;}); // works
    std::cout << std_func_by_value([](int a){return a;}); // works
    std::cout << std_func_by_forwarding(std::move([](int a){return a;})); // works

    //std::cout << by_forwarding([](int a){return a;}); // how to move lambda with forwarding ?
}

Is any of the above attempts correct? If not, how do i achieve my goal?

  • prog.cc:29:41: warning: moving a temporary object prevents copy elision :) clang warnings ftw! – hellow Aug 16 at 9:13
  • 5
    Short answer: int functor_by_value(functor_type x). – George Aug 16 at 9:15
  • std::invoke if you have access to C++17 – Madden Aug 16 at 9:17
  • Lambdas are anonymous, therefore you can only grab its type through type deduction. – Passer By Aug 16 at 9:18
  • It depends on meaning you put into "pass a non generic function" First two variants accept a reference or a pointer to function. 3rd and 4th variant accept an object or an rvalue reference to object with overloaded operator (). So every x has an operator () so usual calling syntax x(1); works, however none of them are functions. – VTT Aug 16 at 9:20
up vote 14 down vote accepted

(based on clarification from comments)

Signature can be restricted by using std::is_invocable:

template<typename x_Action> auto
functor_by_value(x_Action && action)
{
    static_assert(std::is_invocable_r_v<int, x_Action, int>);
    return action(1);
}

online compiler

  • @lubgr Just a habit. I've been working in environment that prohibits implicit object construction. – VTT Aug 16 at 9:54

Other alternative:

template <typename Func>
auto functor_by_value(Func&& f)
-> decltype(std::forward<Func>(f)(1))
{
    return std::forward<Func>(f)(1);
}

however I would like to restrict the function signature as part of the API design.

So restrict it:

#include <functional>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

/// @tparam F is a type which is callable, accepting an int and returning an int
template
<
    class F, 
    std::enable_if_t
    <
        std::is_convertible_v<F, std::function<int(int)>>
    >* = nullptr
>
int myfunc(F &&x) {
    return x(1);
}

int main()
{
    auto a = myfunc([](int x) { std::cout << x << std::endl; return 1; });

    // does not compile
    // auto b = myfunc([]() { std::cout << "foo" << std::endl; return 1; });
}
  • 2
    This would fail when object can be invoked as int (int) but can not be converted to std::function object. For example when object is not copyable / movable but has public: int operator ()(int). – VTT Aug 16 at 10:00
  • @VTT I do agree - std::function expects function objects to be callable on the const interface, which may or may not be a bug in the standard, depending on how you look at it. However, the OP mentioned that std::function was a candidate for the argument type, so I took a lead from there. I saw your answer (and upvoted). I was not aware of the is_invocable_r_t type trait. – Richard Hodges Aug 16 at 11:24

As usual, this depends on how good your compiler is today, and how good it will be in the future.

Currently, compilers are not very good at optimizing std::function. Surprisingly, std::function is a complicated object that sometimes has to allocate memory to maintain stateful lambda functions. It also complicates matters that std::function has to be able to refer to member function, regular functions, and lambdas, and do it in a transparent manner. This transparency has a hefty runtime cost.

So, if you want the fastest possible code, you should be careful with std::function. For that reason the first variant is the fastest (on today's compilers):

int functor_by_value(functor_type x) {
    return x(1);
}

It simply passes a pointer to a function.

When stateful lambdas are involved you have only two options. Either pass the lambda as a template argument, or convert to std::function. Hence, if you want the fastest code possible with lambdas (in today's compilers), you'd pass the function as a templated argument.

Since a lambda function may have a big state, passing it around may copy the big state (when copy elision is not possible). GCC will construct the lambda directly on the parameter list (with no copy), but a nested function will invoke a copy constructor for the lambda. To avoid that, either pass it by const reference (in that case it can't be mutable), or by rvalue reference:

template<class Func>
void run2(const Func & f)
{
    std::cout << "Running\n";
    f();
}
template<class Func>
void run(const Func & f)
{
    run2(f);
}
int main()
{
    run([s=BigState()]() { std::cout << "apply\n"; });
    return 0;
}

Or:

template<class Func>
void run2(Func && f)
{
    f();
}
template<class Func>
void run(Func && f)
{
    run2(std::forward<Func>(f));
}
int main()
{
    run([s=BigState()]() { std::cout << "apply\n"; });
    return 0;
}

Without using references, the BigState() will be copied when the lambda is copied.

UPDATE: After reading the question again I see that it wants to restrict the signature

template<typename Func, 
         typename = std::enable_if_t<
            std::is_convertible_v<decltype(Func(1)), int>>>
void run2(const Func & f)
{
    std::cout << "Running\n";
    f();
}

This will restrict it to any function that can accept int (possibly with an implicit cast), and returns an int or any type that is implicitly cast to int. However, if you want to accept only function-like objects that accept exactly int and return exactly int you can see if the lambda is convertible to std::function<int(int)>

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.