6

This question already has an answer here:

I wonder if there is a better way of doing this - looks like returning out of a foreach doesn't return out of the function containing the foreach loop, which may be an expectation from C# devs.

Just wondering if there is a cleaner way of doing this:

example() {
    var forEachReturned;

    this.items.forEach(item => {
        if (true) {
            forEachReturned = true;
            return;
        }
    });

    if (forEachReturned) {
        return;
    }

    // Do stuff in case forEach has not returned
}

marked as duplicate by Cerbrus javascript Aug 16 '18 at 9:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Spoilt by Linq and Lambdas ... ;) – Fildor Aug 16 '18 at 9:26
  • 3
    FYI C#/.NET's List<T>.ForEach() would behave precisely the same way you're seeing here. JavaScript's Array#forEach is not quite analogous to C#'s foreach loop - one is a method and the other is a control structure. – JLRishe Aug 16 '18 at 9:27
15

The cleaner way would be to not use .forEach. It's almost never needed if you're using TypeScript:

example() {
    for (let item of this.items) {
        if (true) {
            return;
        }
    }      

    // Do stuff in case forEach has not returned
}

If the code inside your loop doesn't have any side-effects and you're just checking for a condition on each item, you could also use a functional approach with .some:

example() {
    if (this.items.some(item => item === 3)) {
        return;
    }

    // Do stuff in case we have not returned
}
  • Excellent, thanks!! One side effect of a 'for' instead of 'foreach' array, is that in Angular 6 and TypeScript 2.9.2, it seems that under certain conditions, using 'for' loops with result in the current object within the array being undefined, whereas that issue does not come up with .forEach(). Any ideas? – Ross Aug 18 '18 at 10:19
  • 1
    @Ross The only situation where I can think of that happening is in the case of a sparse array, e.g. let arr = [1,2,3,,,4,5,6]. forEach and other array prototype methods (map, filter) will skip over the empty entries, but for..of will not. – JLRishe Aug 18 '18 at 13:43

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