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I'm using a C library which rips PDF data and provides me with that data via callbacks. Two callbacks are used, one which provides me with the job header and another which provides me with the the ripped data ranging from 1 - 50MB chunks.

I'm then taking that data and sending it across the wire via TCP to someone who cares.

I'm using the boost async_write to send that data across the wire. I want to synchronize access to the async_write until it's done sending the previous chunk of data.

The C callback functions:

void __stdcall HeaderCallback( void* data, int count )
{
    // The Send function is a member of my AsyncTcpClient class.
    // This is how I'm currently providing my API with the PDF data.
    client.Send( data, count );
}

void __stdcall DataCallback( void* data, int count )
{
    client.Send( data, count );
}

I receive the provided data in my AsyncTcpClient class's Send method.

void AsyncTcpClient::Send( void* buffer, size_t length )
    {
        // Write to the remote server.
        boost::asio::async_write( _session->socket,
            boost::asio::buffer( ( const char* )buffer, length ),
            [ this ]( boost::system::error_code const& error, std::size_t bytesTransfered )
        {
            if ( error )
            {
                _session->errorCode = error;
                OnRequestComplete( _session );
                return;
            }
            std::unique_lock<std::mutex> cancelLock( _session->cancelGuard );
            if ( _session->cancelled )
            {
                OnRequestComplete( _session );
                return;
            }               
        } );
    }

How can I synchronize access to the async_write function? Using a mutex at the start of the Send function would be pointless as the async_write returns immediately. It's also pointless to store the mutex in a unique_lock member variable and attempt to unlock it in the async_write callback lambda as that'll blow up.

How can I synchronize access to the async_write function without using strand? The first iteration of the program wont use strand for synchronization, I will be implementing that later.

1
  • buffer the data and call async_write if there's not already one active. in async_write's handler, check if there's more buffered data and call async_write again if there is. If there is more than one thread involved, you will need to add some synchronisation. – Richard Hodges Aug 16 '18 at 13:20
1

You should use an io_context::strand.

One example from many others, but that answer will help you.

1
  • Yeah, I did end up using a strand. – WBuck Aug 18 '18 at 12:41

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