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I'd like to have IntelliJ IDEA sort the members of my Java class alphabetically, as I'm used to in Eclipse. The "Rearrange Code" command in the Code menu (which surprisingly has no default hotkey) would seem to do this, but it doesn't work.

As noted in Intellij-IDEA: How to sort members alphabetically? you have to go into Preferences | Editor | Code Style | Java, click on the Arrangement tab, and edit the matching rules. These give you a great deal of power to (for example) list static methods first.

Here's the catch: To actually get alphabetical sorting, you have to open up each rule and change the order to "order by name".

My question: is there any way to do this without individually changing each rule? The default configuration has 26 rules and I'd rather not click through all of them.

(Yes, I could have done that in the time it took me to ask this question, but I don't want to inflict this tedium on my students.)

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A very distinct non-answer:

  • Avoid fighting your tool. If you are really switching to intellij, accept its rules.
  • Beyond that, sorting fields alphabetically is a terrible practice.

Meaning:

  • There shouldn't be so many fields that navigating requires ordering in the first place and more importantly:
  • Fields should be grouped logically, so that things that belong together are vertically near to each other. Anything else is terrible for human readers of your code.

Long story short: if you have so many fields in your class that their order matters to you, then you have bigger problems to solve than getting your IDE to sort them alphabetically.

Finally: IntelliJ has the structure window, which of course allows you to display fields and methods sorted alphabetically. Use that view, but seriously do not put alphabetical ordering into your source code.

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  • For what it's worth, I'm more concerned about methods than fields (which is why I used the generic term "member"). – Peter Drake Aug 16 '18 at 23:45
  • Well, the story is similar for methods. Clean code for example advises to put methods in a specific order that goes along the line of flow. – GhostCat Aug 17 '18 at 4:14

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