54

A store number could be 1-4 digits.

Store #26 would be 0026 in respect to how devices are named, but I'd like to give the techs the ease of being able to type 26 to get the same result.

How can I take this variable and format it to always be 4 digits by appending the leading zeroes?

## Ask user for store number and affected AP number to query
$Global:Store = Read-Host "Store Number ";
$Global:apNumber= Read-Host "AP Number ";

## Clean up input for validity
IF($store.length -le 4) {
  $store = 
}
0

4 Answers 4

82

You would use -format operator:

'{0:d4}' -f $variable

https://ss64.com/ps/syntax-f-operator.html

the above will work if your variable is an integer, if not you can cast it to integer:

'{0:d4}' -f [int]$variable
7
  • Does it need to be an integer for this to work? Can't seem to get it to validate.
    – CodeSpent
    Commented Aug 18, 2018 at 21:56
  • 5
    '{0:d4}' -f +$variable Commented Aug 18, 2018 at 23:21
  • 4
    '{0:d4}' -f [int]$variable does the same as Mathias' suggestion (convert the value to an integer before passing it to the format string), but is probably a little more up-front about what it does. Commented Aug 19, 2018 at 9:06
  • 3
    Both work, but personally I prefer using single-quoted strings unless the string contains something PowerShell should expand (like variables or escape sequences). Just to avoid surprises. Commented Aug 19, 2018 at 9:09
  • 3
    @4c74356b41 I always use single-quotes with the format operator, a subtle way of indicating "DON'T DROP VARIABLE REFERENCES IN HERE, LET THE -f OPERATOR DO ITS JOB" Commented Aug 19, 2018 at 12:13
32

Just to avoid having PetSerAl's useful help go to waste (should the comment be deleted at some point):

Aside from using the format operator (-f), which I would consider the preferred approach, you can also use formatting methods provided by the respective value.

  • If the value is a string (as it seems to be in your case), you can pad it with zeroes:

    '26'.PadLeft(4, '0')
    
  • If the value is numeric you can format it as a string:

    (26).ToString('0000')
    
1
  • 4
    Good reason to prefer the -f operator is that if system administrators have locked down Windows 10, any calls to .NET methods and properties will need administrator access, and -f is a built in PowerShell operator that should always work for any non-adminstrator users that are allowed to use PowerShell because it has no security related problems.
    – peSHIr
    Commented Oct 4, 2019 at 8:06
12

Foreach versions of padleft and tostring. The 0 in the first one has to be quoted:

'4' | % padleft 4 '0'
0004

4 | % tostring 0000
0004

Working with a range:

1..10 | % tostring 0000

0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0009
0010

With a prefix:

1..10 | % tostring COMP0000

COMP0001
COMP0002
COMP0003
COMP0004
COMP0005
COMP0006
COMP0007
COMP0008
COMP0009
COMP0010
1
  • I couldn't get ToString or the format operator or PadLeft operator to work, but padleft did. An hour of my life I will never get back
    – Francis
    Commented Jun 12 at 23:18
0

Adding to other's answers here, if you want to make/change an array of data to have a specific leading zero structure (or any other changes to the data) you can do this:

$old_array = (0..100)
$new_array = @()
$old_array | % { $new_array += "{0:d3}" -f $_}

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