Suppose I have a template of a function, say

template<typename T>
func(T a, T b, ...) {
  ...
  for (const auto &single : group) {
    ...
    auto c = GivenFunc1(a, b, single, ...);
    ...      }
  ...
}

However, for T being a special type, say "SpecialType", I want c being calculated by "GivenFunc2" rather than "GivenFunc1". However, I would not like to write a specialization for "SpecialType", since there will be a huge code duplication. So I want the template function being something like

template<typename T>
func(T a, T b, ...) {
  ...
  for (const auto &single : group) {
    ...
    auto c = (T == SpecialType) ? GivenFunc2(a, b, single, ...)
                                : GivenFunc1(a, b, single, ...);
    ...      }
  ...
}

Of course, this code does not compile since "T == SpecialType" is not valid. So how do I write it in an elegant way?

up vote 30 down vote accepted

It's as simple as:

auto c = std::is_same_v<T, SpecialType> ? GivenFunc2(a, b, single, ...)
                                        : GivenFunc1(a, b, single, ...);

If you can't use C++17, replace std::is_same_v<...> with std::is_same<...>::value.

But for this approach to work, both function calls have to be valid for every T you want to use, even if in reality one of them won't be executed.


If it's not the case, you can resort to if constexpr:

your_type_here c;
if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, SpecialType>)
    c = GivenFunc2(a, b, single, ...);
else
    c = GivenFunc1(a, b, single, ...);

(This works only in C++17.)

  • 8
    I'd recommend using if constexpr either way. Sure, the compiler should be able to optimise away the check, but checking the validity of the other function call can be costly, especially if it involves additional template instantiations. Also, not using if constexpr can be a maintenance problem for those functions: anyone modifying them will have to take into account that they need to be valid even for arguments for which they'll never be called. – user743382 Aug 19 at 9:29
  • Great answer, lovely 6 votes. Unfortunately, as much as I would like to see this work on the compiler I'm using, it doesn't work. Is this a C++17 template/function? – TrebuchetMS Aug 19 at 9:46
  • 3
    @JohnLaw Yes, std::is_same_v is C++17. If you don't have it, use std::is_same<...>::value instead. if constexpr is C++17 too, check other answers for alternatives. – HolyBlackCat Aug 19 at 9:53
  • Alright, thanks for clarifying. :-) – TrebuchetMS Aug 19 at 9:56

If you can use C++17, you can achieve the result in a very clean way (with constexpr and is_same):

template<typename T>
func(T a, T b, ...) {
  // ...

  if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, SpecialType>) {
    // call GivenFunc2
  } else {
    // call GivenFunc1
  } 

  // ...
}

Pre C++17 you can achieve the same result using techniques such as SFINAE or "TAG Dispatching".

Additionally, you can just specialize the portion of the code referring to the function call (easy and avoid code duplication).

A short example here:

template <typename T>
struct DispatcherFn {
  auto operator()(const T&, int) {
      // call GivenFunc1
  }
};

template <>
struct DispatcherFn<SpecialType> {
  auto operator()(const SpecialType&, int) {
    // GivenFunc2
  }
};

template <typename T>
void func(const T& t) {
  // ... code ...
  auto c = DispatcherFn<T>()(t, 49);  // specialized call
}

You can always use template specializations instead of doing type comparisons of template parameters. Here's a simplified, working example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template<typename T>
int GivenFunc1(T a, T b) {
     std::cout << "GivenFunc1()" << std::endl;
     return 0;
}

template<typename T>
int GivenFunc2(T a, T b) {
     std::cout << "GivenFunc2()" << std::endl;
     return 1;
}

template<typename T>
void func(T a, T b) {
    auto c = GivenFunc2(a, b);
    std::cout << c << std::endl;
}

template<>
void func(std::string a, std::string b) {
    auto c = GivenFunc1(a, b);
    std::cout << c << std::endl;
}

int main() {
    func(2,3);
    std::string a = "Hello";
    std::string b = "World";
    func(a,b);
}

See it working online here.

In the best solution is if constexpr.

In this works:

template<class V>
auto dispatch( V const& ) {
  return [](auto&&...targets) {
    return std::get<V{}>( std::forward_as_tuple( decltype(targets)(targets)... ) );
  };
}

then:

 auto c = dispatch( std::is_same<T, SpecialType>{} )
 (
   [&](auto&& a, auto&& b){ return GivenFunc2(a, b, single...); },
   [&](auto&& a, auto&& b){ return GivenFunc1(a, b, single, ...); }
 )( a, b );

does what you want. (It is also a function which returns a function which returns a function)

Live example.

dispatch picks one of the two lambdas and returns it at compile time. We then call the picked lambda with a and b. So only the valid one is compiled with a type for a and b.

Convert GivenFunc1 to a functor and specialise that.

template <class T>
class GivenFunc
{
    X operator()(T a, T b, Y single)
    {
        ...
    }
}

template <>
class GivenFunc<SpecialType>
{
    X operator()(SpecialType a, SpecialType b, Y single)
    {
        ...
    }
}

Then you can say

auto c = GivenFunc<T>()(a, b, single);

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.