7

I saw two ways of saving the weights of a keras model.

First way;

checkpointer = ModelCheckpoint(filepath="weights.hdf5", verbose=1, save_best_only=True)
model.fit(x_train, y_train,
                    nb_epoch=number_of_epoch,
                    batch_size=128,
                    verbose=1,
                    validation_data=(x_test, y_test),
                    callbacks=[reduce_lr, checkpointer],
                    shuffle=True)

Second way;

model.save_weights("model_weights.h5")

What is the difference between the two ways? Any difference in prediction performance between loading weights.hdf5 and model_weights.h5?

  • You tell us -- did it have an impact? – erip Aug 20 '18 at 1:13
  • @erip, I just discovered first method always save the best weights. No guarantee for the second method. – user1315789 Aug 20 '18 at 3:45
11

No, there is no difference performance-wise. These are just two different ways of how and especially when the model shall be saved. Using model.save_weights requires to especially call this function whenever you want to save the model, e.g. after the training or parts of the training are done. Using ModelCheckpoint is much more convenient if you are still developing a model. Using this way, keras can save a checkpoint of your model after each training epoch, so that you can restore the different models; or you can set save_best_only=True so that keras will overwrite the latest checkpoint only if the performance has improved, so that you end with the best performing model.

To summarize it: these are just two different ways of doing two different things. It depends on your use case and needs, what's the best.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Thanks for your answer. Upvoted. I think there is a key difference. Using ModelCheckpoint with save_best_only=True, one is guaranteed to save the best weights. No guarantee for the other method. So, save_best_only=True is always better. I cannot think of any other reason not to use it all the time. – user1315789 Aug 20 '18 at 3:45
  • 1
    @FlashTek, can you also tell us the difference between hdf5 and h5? Both are saving the model with weight, correct? Thanks – Florida Man Jun 18 '19 at 8:36
  • 2
    @FloridaMan It's the same. Just different file extensions, but otherwise the files will be identical. *.h5 and *.hdf5 are synonymous file extensions. – zimmerrol Jun 18 '19 at 8:52

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