67

Consider the following example. The example is contrived but illustrates the point in a runnable example:

class MultiplicatorMixin:

    def multiply(self, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m


class AdditionMixin:

    def add(self, b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyClass(MultiplicatorMixin, AdditionMixin):

    def __init__(self, value: int) -> None:
        self.value = value


instance = MyClass(10)
print(instance.add(2))
print(instance.multiply(2))

When executed this will give the following output:

12
20

The code works.

But running mypy on it, yields the following errors:

example.py:4: error: "MultiplicatorMixin" has no attribute "value"
example.py:10: error: "AdditionMixin" has no attribute "value"

I understand why mypy gives this result. But the mixin classes are never used by themselves. They are always used as additional superclasses.

For context, this is a pattern which has been used in an existing application and I am in the process of adding type-hints. And in this case, the errors are false-positives. I am thinking about rewriting the part using the mixins as I don't particularly like it and the same could probably be done with reorganising the class hierarchy.

But I still would like to know how something like this could be properly hinted.

4
  • Are the type hints what cause the mypy error? Or do you still get those errors without the type hints? If that's the case, then type hints have nothing to do with the problem, and I think your question should be "How do I deal with missing attribute errors in mypy?" Aug 20, 2018 at 12:06
  • @JonathonReinhart I don't underastand what you mean. If I remove the type-hints, then mypy will no longer do anything (by assuming everything is of type Any). So I don't see the point in doing that. FWIW, I removed the type hints and ran it again, and as expected, the errors are gone (as everything is Any).
    – exhuma
    Aug 20, 2018 at 12:22
  • Sorry, I wasn't familiar with mypy, and assumed it was just a pylint-style checker. Still, I feel like this doesn't really have anything to do with the type hints themselves, and is just a limitation of the mypy tool. Aug 20, 2018 at 12:24
  • Absolutely possible. But in that case it would be good to know of any kind of best-practice in that case. I could sprinkle some # type: ignore comments around, but I would like to see if there is an alternative before completely disabling type-checks.
    – exhuma
    Aug 20, 2018 at 12:28

10 Answers 10

71

For reference, mypy recommends to implement mixins through a Protocol (documentation here).

It works with mypy >= 750.

from typing import Protocol


class HasValueProtocol(Protocol):
    @property
    def value(self) -> int: ...


class MultiplicationMixin:

    def multiply(self: HasValueProtocol, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m


class AdditionMixin:

    def add(self: HasValueProtocol, b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyClass(MultiplicationMixin, AdditionMixin):

    def __init__(self, value: int) -> None:
        self.value = value

The Protocol base class is provided in the typing_extensions package for Python 2.7 and 3.4-3.7.

3
  • 1
    Yes. I saw the announcement yesterday. This is really a nice addition. Can't wait until our servers support this!
    – exhuma
    Dec 3, 2019 at 9:00
  • 2
    A big downside of using self: HasValueProtocol in methods for AdditionMixin is that self is no longer of type AdditionMixin. This makes it an error to try and call other methods defined in AdditionMixin from inside the body of these methods.
    – WhyNotHugo
    Sep 7, 2023 at 13:59
  • @WhyNotHugo this concern (actually, huge limitation) seems to be avoided in the other answer to this question which is suggesting to inherit the protocol rather than coerce the self type. This still feels a little shaky, I doubt why mypy suggest this while protocols were primarily designed for duck-typing and not inheritance. Feels patchy to me. I'll be using an abstract class instead, as my IDE has very poor and misleading static analysis support for protocols.
    – matanox
    Dec 29, 2023 at 17:34
29

In addition to Campi's answer about the mypy's recommendation of typing mixins with Protocol:

An alternative to typing the methods' selfs is just inheriting the protocol.

from typing import Protocol


class HasValueProtocol(Protocol):
    @property
    def value(self) -> int: ...


class MultiplicationMixin(HasValueProtocol):

    def multiply(self, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m


class AdditionMixin(HasValueProtocol):

    def add(self, b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyClass(MultiplicationMixin, AdditionMixin):

    def __init__(self, value: int) -> None:
        self.value = value

Additionally, if you are TYPE_CHECKING a Protocol, and given that you cannot forward reference a parent class (i.e. passing the parent class as a string literal), a workaround would be:

from typing import Protocol, TYPE_CHECKING


if TYPE_CHECKING:
    class HasValueProtocol(Protocol):
        @property
        def value(self) -> int: ...
else:
    class HasValueProtocol: ...


class MultiplicationMixin(HasValueProtocol):
    def multiply(self, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m

...
22
  • 2
    This feels far nicer than the answer I currently accepted and is much more in line with the current state. Thanks for the update. Note: I think you meant "Campi" instead of "Dec" ;)
    – exhuma
    Jan 31, 2022 at 12:21
  • 5
    This is a much nicer answer than typing the individual "self" arguments, because typing self as the Protocol prevents you from accessing attributes on the Mixin class itself. (It is just the Protocol) May 3, 2022 at 2:37
  • 2
    @TuukkaMustonen Nope. A class needs to explicitly inherit from Protocol to become a protocol (class MultiplicationMixin(HasValueProtocol, Protocol): ...). Otherwise, it just inherits the protocol's default implementation. And, in any case, a protocol can contain actual code. Sep 6, 2022 at 20:29
  • 1
    Cool. Thanks for clarifying that! Sep 12, 2022 at 7:13
  • 2
    Campi's answer will fail if your mixin defines multiple methods which need to access each other (because you're annotating self with the fields, not the mixin itself anymore). This answer will work, and you can also inherit from any other required types, whereas protocols can only inherit from protocols.
    – theberzi
    Jan 18, 2023 at 8:38
12

One approach I saw in this question is type hinting the self attribute. Together with Union from the typing package, you are able to use the attributes from a class which is used together with your mixin, while still having correct type hinting for own attributes:

from typing import Union

class AdditionMixin:

    def add(self: Union[MyBaseClass, 'AdditionMixin'], b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyBaseClass:

    def __init__(self, value: int):
        self.value = value

Downside is that you have to add the hint to every method, which is kind of cumbersome.

4
  • 7
    Wouldn't this defeat the purpose of the mixin though? Because now you can only use it with subclasses of MyBaseClass. Meaning that you could also just move the add method into MyBaseClass
    – exhuma
    Sep 13, 2018 at 11:52
  • 3
    In my case, I'm building mixins for the django-rest-framework, which also comes with a couple of mixins: github.com/encode/django-rest-framework/blob/master/… The mixins are always used together with the GenericAPIView, giving basic functionality, while each mixin provides a different additional feature
    – soerface
    Sep 13, 2018 at 12:08
  • 3
    Simplified: MyBaseClass could provide various calculations, but the user should choose which ones are supported. MyBaseClass provides a value attribute, and the users choose which of the mixins AdditionMixin, SubtractionMixin, DivisionMixin and MultiplicationMixin they need in their application
    – soerface
    Sep 13, 2018 at 12:13
  • 1
    @exhuma no: it's not a problem if a mixin declares some expectations about the class it wants to mix into :) Protocols serve this purpose better, though
    – kolypto
    Feb 4, 2022 at 14:51
8

Try with:

from typing import Type, TYPE_CHECKING, TypeVar

T = TypeVar('T')


def with_typehint(baseclass: Type[T]) -> Type[T]:
    """
    Useful function to make mixins with baseclass typehint

    ```
    class ReadonlyMixin(with_typehint(BaseAdmin)):
        ...
    ```
    """
    if TYPE_CHECKING:
        return baseclass
    return object

Example tested in Pyright:

class ReadOnlyInlineMixin(with_typehint(BaseModelAdmin)):
    def get_readonly_fields(self,
                            request: WSGIRequest,
                            obj: Optional[Model] = None) -> List[str]:

        if self.readonly_fields is None:
            readonly_fields = []
        else:
            readonly_fields = self.readonly_fields # self get is typed by baseclass

        return self._get_readonly_fields(request, obj) + list(readonly_fields)

    def has_change_permission(self,
                              request: WSGIRequest,
                              obj: Optional[Model] = None) -> bool:
        return (
            request.method in ['GET', 'HEAD']
            and super().has_change_permission(request, obj) # super is typed by baseclass
        )

>>> ReadOnlyAdminMixin.__mro__
(<class 'custom.django.admin.mixins.ReadOnlyAdminMixin'>, <class 'object'>)
3
  • 5
    This seems overly convoluted just to get type-hints.
    – exhuma
    Jul 10, 2020 at 12:52
  • 1
    Yes but is also kind of smart. As long as there is no official Implementation this seems my preferred way to got. For reference here the link the same proposal in a mypy issue.
    – Kound
    Dec 6, 2020 at 13:19
  • @exhuma It's necessary for mixin classes for frameworks such as Qt, that use custom metaclasses defined in C, where it's invalid to double inherit from multiple Qt base classes Oct 23, 2023 at 15:42
4

I've tested it on my machine, hope it will also work for you:

class MultiplicatorMixin:
    value = None # type: int

    def multiply(self, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m


class AdditionMixin:
    value = None # type: int

    def add(self, b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyClass(MultiplicatorMixin, AdditionMixin):

    def __init__(self, value: int) -> None:
        self.value = value


instance = MyClass(10)
print(instance.add(2))
print(instance.multiply(2))
4
  • 22
    And when MyClass has a whole lot of attributes, I would end up copying all of them, having a maintenance hell especially if MyClass is from an external dependency. I don't think this is a viable solution.
    – soerface
    Sep 13, 2018 at 11:40
  • 1
    I actually think this is the proper solution. You only need to add class-level attributes for the value with which the mixin is concerned about. Which makes perfect sense.
    – exhuma
    Sep 13, 2018 at 11:54
  • 1
    @soerface Fine, It depends. For my use cases, Mixin can be used by multiple Superclasses in order to gain some additional functionalities. If you use multiple Mixin to support only one Superclass, this is not for you.
    – Sraw
    Sep 13, 2018 at 16:48
  • Isn't this solution problematic when in models of ORMs? Could adding a class variable lead to a new attribute in the ORM? May 19, 2021 at 4:20
3

My solution: add a value: int without any init to Mixin class:

class MultiplicatorMixin:
    value: int

    def multiply(self, m: int) -> int:
        return self.value * m


class AdditionMixin:
    value: int

    def add(self, b: int) -> int:
        return self.value + b


class MyClass(MultiplicatorMixin, AdditionMixin):

    def __init__(self, value: int) -> None:
        self.value = value


instance = MyClass(10)
print(instance.add(2))
print(instance.multiply(2))
2
  • I'm wondering what could be the issues with applying this solution since it doesn't have many upvotes. I can see that it works fine with minimum code to add? Jul 7, 2022 at 12:50
  • Doesn't that make value a static class variable?
    – matanox
    Dec 29, 2023 at 17:49
2

In addition to good answers mentioned above. My use case - mixins to be used in tests.

As proposed by Guido van Rossum himself here:

from typing import *
T = TypeVar('T')

class Base:
    fit: Callable

class Foo(Base):
    def fit(self, arg1: int) -> Optional[str]:
        pass

class Bar(Foo):
    def fit(self, arg1: float) -> str:
        pass    

Thus, when it comes to a mixin, it could look as follows:


class UsefulMixin:

    assertLess: Callable
    assertIn: Callable
    assertIsNotNone: Callable

    def something_useful(self, key, value):
        self.assertIsNotNone(key)
        self.assertLess(key, 10)
        self.assertIn(value, ['Alice', 'in', 'Wonderland']


class AnotherUsefulMixin:

    assertTrue: Callable
    assertFalse: Callable
    assertIsNone: Callable

    def something_else_useful(self, val, foo, bar):
        self.assertTrue(val)
        self.assertFalse(foo)
        self.assertIsNone(bar)  

And our final class would look as follows:

class TestSomething(unittest.TestCase, UsefulMixin, AnotherUsefulMixin):

    def test_something(self):
        self.something_useful(10, 'Alice')
        self.something_else_useful(True, False, None)
5
  • 2
    @exhuma: It's a complementary answer, which does not only cover variables, but also a way to deal with callables. It also contains useful information on what the creator of Python himself thinks of it. If Sraw would update his answer with this information (which was useful to me, as I didn't find what I was looking for) or someone else would take that initiative (I'm not sure if it's allowed or not), I'm willing to remove mine. Sep 19, 2019 at 12:23
  • Please don't take this the wrong way, I am mainly worried that I am missing something and that maybe I can learn something from your answer: I still don't see the difference. The only difference I can make out is that it is using annotations instead of the # type: ... comment. Using assertLess = None # type: Callable should be the same. Or am I missing something?
    – exhuma
    Sep 20, 2019 at 7:42
  • @exhauma: AFAIK assertLess = None # type: Callable is Python 2 way of doing this, since real typing had been introduced in Python 3.6 only. Thus, nowadays using typing explicitly is better. Besides, the most valuable thing for me that I have found in the link I mentioned in my answer, is the approach van Guido van Rossum himself. For me, his answer there, in that GitHub issue - was the best. :) Sep 20, 2019 at 8:14
  • The type-comment is also valid for Python <3.6. It is correct that this syntax was introduced in 3.6, but type-hints (or rather "annotations") have been around since 3.3 IIRC. I routinely type-check Python 3.5 code so I still rely on the type-comment. I agree that the new 3.6 syntax is cleaner though as technically it would be necessary to write foo = None # type: Optional[Callable] in the old syntax to accommodate for the default value.
    – exhuma
    Sep 20, 2019 at 8:23
  • This answer suggests using the same principle as the earlier answer by @Sraw, i.e. adding type hints to the mixin attributes directly. It introduces a maintenance cost of keeping the type hints of every mixin up-to-date with its potential base classes. Dec 3, 2021 at 11:43
1

One method that you do not have to write type hint at every method:

import typing


class FooMixin:
    base = typing.Union["Hello", "World"]

    def alpha(self: base):
        self.hello()

    def beta(self: base):
        self.world()


class Base(object):
    pass


class Hello(Base, FooMixin):
    def hello(self):
        print("hello from", self)


class World(Base, FooMixin):
    def world(self):
        print("world from", self)


Hello().alpha()
World().beta()
0

It's possible to do something like this when using Protocol and BaseClass in the mixin:

from typing import TYPE_CHECKING, Protocol, cast


class BaseClass:
    def __init__(self) -> None:
        self.name = "base name"


class SizeProtocol(Protocol):
    size: int


class DoubleSizeMixin:
    """
    Add this mixin to classes implementing `SizeProtocol` and inheriting from `BaseClass`
    """

    def get_double_size_with_name(self) -> tuple:
        _self: "DoubleSizeMixinT" = self  # type: ignore
        return (_self.name, _self.size * 2)

    # Another option:
    def get_double_size_with_name_v2(self) -> tuple:
        self = cast("DoubleSizeMixinT", self)  # pylint: disable=self-cls-assignment
        return (self.name, self.size * 2)


if TYPE_CHECKING:
    class DoubleSizeMixinT(SizeProtocol, DoubleSizeMixin, BaseClass):
        pass


class A(BaseClass, SizeProtocol, DoubleSizeMixin):
    def __init__(self) -> None:
        super().__init__()
        self.size = 2


print(A().get_double_size_with_name())
0

Some of the other proposed solutions, particularly Protocol, are elegant and work well. But for complex mixin classes, to avoid having to add a protocol for every used method or property, this might be a cleaner alternative. Another advantage is that you can do things like decorating methods with @override,

import typing
from foo import ComplexClass

if typing.TYPE_CHECKING:
    class ComplexClassMixin(ComplexClass): ...
else:
    class ComplexClassMixin: ...

class MyMixin(ComplexClassMixin):
    @typing.override
    def my_method():
        return super().my_method()

Seems like it is possible to wrap it in a reusable function as well, as tested on VSCode with Pylance/Pyright.

import typing
from foo import ComplexClass

if typing.TYPE_CHECKING:
    def as_mixin_type(cls):
        return cls
else:
    def as_mixin_type(cls):
        return object

class MyMixin(as_mixin_type(ComplexClass)):
    @typing.override
    def my_method():
        return super().my_method()

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