14

I am familiar with RSpec where it is very easy to reuse test cases by writing shared examples

shared_example_for 'a cute pet' do 
  it 'tests that the pet is a small' { expect(pet.size).to be_lesser_than(10) }
  it 'tests that the pet can smile' { expect(pet.can_smile?).to be }
end

describe 'The Octocat' do
  let(:pet) Octocat.new

  it_behaves_like 'a cute pet'
end
...
describe 'The Doge' do 
  let(:pet) Doge.new

  it_behaves_like 'a cute pet'
end

Is there an equivalent in Jest ? Something that would let me reuse variables set in beforeEach() blocks ? I am trying to find a way using something like the following :

# __tests__/cuteness.js
export const cutenessTests = function() {
  test('it is small', () => {
    expect(petSetInBefore.length).toBeLesserThan(5)
  })
  test('it can smile', () => {
    expect(petSetInBefore.canSmile).toBe(true)
  })
}

# __tests__/famous_animals.test.js
import { cutenessTests } from './cuteness'

describe('Famous animals', () => {
  let petSetInBefore;

  describe('Octocat', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
      petSetInBefore = new Octocat();
    })

    cutenessTests.bind(this)()
  })
})

The important here is that I am trying to share multiple test definitions and not just one, otherwise I could have passed the petSetInBefore to the shared function.

EDIT : each of my tests and nested describe are likely to alter my test environment and objects, so the beforeEach is used to restore a proper test environment. Here is a better example

class Octocat {
  get strokeFor(time) {
    this.strokeTime = this.strokeTime + time
    if (this.strokeTime <= 10) {
      this.mood = 'happy'
    } else {
      this.mood = 'bored'
    }
  }
}

class Doge {
  get strokeFor(time) {
    this.strokeTime = this.strokeTime + time
    if (this.strokeTime <= 5) {
      this.mood = 'happy'
    } else {
      this.mood = 'bored'
    }
  }
}

const cutenessTests = function() {
  describe('when stroked for a short while', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
      petSetInBefore.strokeFor(1);
    })

    test('it is happy', () => { expect(petSetInBefore.mood).to(eq('happy')) }

    describe('when stroked too much', () => {
      beforeEach(() => {
        petSetInBefore.stroke(1000);
      })

      test('it gets bored', () => { expect(petSetInBefore.mood).to(eq('bored')) }
    })

    describe('when stroked a little longer', () => {
      beforeEach(() => {
        petSetInBefore.strokeFor(4);
      })

      test('it is still happy', () => { expect(petSetInBefore.mood).to(eq('happy')) }
    })
  })
}

EDIT2: Here is a repl.it based on Gui3's answer

EDIT3 : the object can be altered before or during the reusable tests

describe('Famous animals', () => {
  let petSetInBefore;

  describe('Octocat', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
      petSetInBefore = new Octocat();
    })

    describe('when it is not well rested', () => { 
      beforeEach(() => { petSetInBefore.wellRested() } // Extra object preparation / context before calling reusable examples
      cutenessTests()
    }),
    describe('when it is not well rested', () => { 
      // Calling reusable examples without extra context
      cutenessTests()
    })
  })
})
  • Note: even though this could be useful when mass-reusing tests, we actually prefer duplicating test code to some extent to facilitate static analysis and benefit from IDE capabilities. For instance, Visual Studio Code is able to automatically run your tests while you write them, and indicate with red/green circles which tests have passed in the background: it won't work in situations like this. But if you have to reuse a series of test in a lot of files (page requires authentication, deny access to banned users, etc.) this could still be useful. – Cyril Duchon-Doris Nov 30 '19 at 13:09
3
+50

If you still want beforeEach,

for reasons ... it works if you declare your variable in the global scope

let petSetInBefore; // here it works
describe('Famous animals', () => {
  //let petSetInBefore; // here it's undefined

  describe('Octocat', ()  => {
    //let petSetInBefore; // undefined too

    beforeAll(() => {
      petSetInBefore = new Octocat();
    })

    cutenessTests() // .bind(this) results the same
  });

  describe('Doge', () => {
    beforeEach(() => {
      petSetInBefore = new Doge();
    })

    cutenessTests.bind(this)()
  });
})

https://repl.it/@gui3/jestSharedTests

seems like the tests inside the shared function cannot share variables from beforeEach otherwise ...

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks, I have extended your tests to take into account my EDIT, it turns out iI need beforeEach to make sure the test objects are clean repl.it/repls/LawfulDelightfulAbility – Cyril Duchon-Doris Nov 30 '19 at 12:31
  • 1
    I am not entirely satisfied with the solution since it involves global variable that are not scoped, but I guess this will stay the accepted answer until there's something new that could be scoped to a describe block. And it probably isn't so much of a problem to have global variables in tests since I guess jest will clear those out when executing different tests ?. – Cyril Duchon-Doris Nov 30 '19 at 12:36
3

You can simply move the shared tests into a function that does the it() calls.

class Octocat {
  get length() {
    return 3;
  }

  get canSmile() {
    return true;
  }
}

class GrumpyCat {
  get length() {
    return 1;
  }

  get canSmile() {
    return false;
  }
}

const behavesLikeAPet = (pet) => {
  it('is small', () => expect(pet.length).toBeLessThan(5));
  it('can smile', () => expect(pet.canSmile).toEqual(true));
};

describe('Famous animals', () => {
  describe('Octocat', () => {
    behavesLikeAPet(new Octocat());
  });

  describe('GrumpyCat', () => {
    behavesLikeAPet(new GrumpyCat());
  });
});

You will get detailed output for every it test:

Famous animals
  Octocat
    ✓ is small (2ms)
    ✓ can smile (1ms)
  GrumpyCat
    ✓ is small
    ✕ can smile (2ms)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks I have edited my question : the trick being that my object is likely to change when performing tests, and it is important that before each test, I properly restore the test environment. So using a single new Octocat() is not feasible nad it needs to be a new object on every test. – Cyril Duchon-Doris Nov 30 '19 at 12:31
  • @CyrilDuchon-Doris So you want an entirely new instance of the pet for each it() call? You could simply pass the class name to behavesLikeAPet then, and let each it() create a new instance: it('is small', () => expect((new Pet()).length).toBeLessThan(5)); – timotgl Nov 30 '19 at 12:50
3

Jest has describe.each(table) which I haven't seen being used a lot, but it's really helpful for reusing tests which have common/same results.

In case for identical expectations for both of the test subjects you can do it like this:

const aCutePet = pet => {
  it("should be small", () => {
    expect(pet.size).toBeLessThan(10);
  });

  it(`should be able to smile`, () => {
    expect(pet).toHaveProperty('can_smile', true)
  });
}

describe.each([
  [new Doge],
  [new Octocat]
])("The %O", aCutePet);

The output:

  The Doge { size: 3, can_smile: true }
    ✓ should be small (1ms)
    ✓ should be able to smile (1ms)
  The Octocat { size: 5, can_smile: true }
    ✓ should be small
    ✓ should be able to smile (1ms)
| improve this answer | |
  • The above solutions didn't work well for me when integrating with Playwright and dealing with login and navigation. Tests would hang and fail. I prefer this answer because it is readily available from jest and works well. – rdrw May 7 at 17:07

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