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I am trying to get a deeper understanding to how for loops for different data types in Python. The simplest way of using a for loop an iterating over an array is as

for i in range(len(array)):
    do_something(array[i])

I also know that I can

for i in array:
    do_something(i)

What I would like to know is what this does

for i, j in range(len(array)):
    # What is i and j here?

or

for i, j in array:
    # What is i and j in this case?

And what happens if I try using this same idea with dictionaries or tuples?

  • 2
    for i, j in range(len(array)) won't work – roganjosh Aug 20 '18 at 15:19
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga second example will work if array is an iterable of length-2 iterables. – FHTMitchell Aug 20 '18 at 15:19
  • This might help? – TrebledJ Aug 20 '18 at 15:20
  • 3
    I would argue that the simplest way of iterating over a list in Python is to omit indices altogether: for i in array: do_something(i). – Nicholas Flees Aug 20 '18 at 15:21
  • 1
    Note that this is generally referred to as unpacking and is not restricted to for loops. It is the same mechanism as used in explicit assignment, such as values = 1, 2, 3 and a, b, c = values. – MisterMiyagi Aug 20 '18 at 15:24
5

The simplest way is the second method, not the first one:

for i in array:
    do_something(i)

Never do this:

for i in range(len(array)):
    do_something(array[i])

If you need the index in the array for some reason (usually you don't), then do this instead:

for i, element in enumerate(array):
    do_something(element)

This is an error:

for i, j in range(len(array)):
    # What is i and j here?

You will get TypeError: 'int' object is not iterable trying to unpack one integer into two names.

for i, j in array:
    # What is i and j in this case?

It assumes array is "two-dimensional", for example:

>>> for i, j in [(0, 1), ('a', 'b')]:
...     print('i:', i, 'j:', j)
...     
i: 0 j: 1
i: a j: b

Note: ['these', 'structures'] are called lists in Python, not arrays.

2

Your third loop will not work as it will throw a TypeError for an int not being iterable. This is because you are trying to "unpack" the int that is the array's index into i, and j which is not possible. An example of unpacking is like so:

tup = (1,2)
a,b = tup

where you assign a to be the first value in the tuple and b to be the second. This is also useful when you may have a function return a tuple of values and you want to unpack them immediately when calling the function. Like,

train_X, train_Y, validate_X, validate_Y = make_data(data)

More common loop cases that I believe you are referring to is how to iterate over an arrays items and it's index.

for i, e in enumerate(array):
    ...

and

for k,v in d.items():  
    ...

when iterating over the items in a dictionary. Furthermore, if you have two lists, l1 and l2 you can iterate over both of the contents like so

for e1, e2 in zip(l1,l2):
    ...

Note that this will truncate the longer list in the case of unequal lengths while iterating. Or say that you have a lists of lists where the outer lists are of length m and the inner of length n and you would rather iterate over the elements in the inner lits grouped together by index. This is effectively iterating over the transpose of the matrix, you can use zip to perform this operation as well.

for inner_joined in zip(*matrix):  # will run m times
    # len(inner_joined) == m
    ...
  • 1
    Might also be helpful to offer an example of zip here as well. – rahlf23 Aug 20 '18 at 15:21
  • @rahlf23 agreed – modesitt Aug 20 '18 at 15:22
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    @rahlf23 And maybe just an list of 2-tuples as points or something. – abarnert Aug 20 '18 at 15:22
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Actually, "the simplest way of using a for loop an iterating over an array" (the Python type is named "list" BTW) is the second one, ie

for item in somelist:
    do_something_with(item)

which FWIW works for all iterables (lists, tuples, sets, dicts, iterators, generators etc).

The range-based C-style version is considered highly unpythonic, and will only work with lists or list-like iterables.

What I would like to know is what this does

for i, j in range(len(array)):
    # What is i and j here?

Well, you could just test it by yourself... But the result is obvious: it will raise a TypeError because unpacking only works on iterables and ints are not iterable.

or

for i, j in array:
    # What is i and j in this case?

Depends on what is array and what it yields when iterating over it. If it's a list of 2-tuples or an iterator yielding 2-tuples, i and j will be the elements of the current iteration item, ie:

array = [(letter, ord(letter)) for letter in "abcdef"]
for letter, letter_ord in array:
    print("{} : {}".format(letter, letter_ord))

Else, it will most probably raise a TypeError too.

Note that if you want to have both the item and index, the solution is the builtin enumerate(sequence), which yields an (index, item) tuple for each item:

array = list("abcdef")
for index, letter in enumerate(array):
    print("{} : {}".format(index, letter)

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