1

I'm looking to get the closest previous reading for each 15 minute interval (i.e. 12:00:00 AM, 12:15:00 AM, 12:30:00AM) for an arbitrary number of readings between intervals.

For example, I'm looking to have df:

Timestamp   Value (kW)
8/12/2018 23:00:06  51
8/13/2018 0:00:16   52
8/13/2018 0:10:26   53
8/13/2018 0:14:36   54
8/13/2018 0:15:00   55
8/13/2018 0:19:57   56
8/13/2018 0:29:09   57
8/13/2018 0:38:17   58
8/13/2018 0:44:59   59
8/13/2018 0:45:00   60
8/13/2018 0:58:47   61
8/13/2018 1:01:57   62


structure(list(Timestamp = c("8/12/2018 23:00:00", "8/13/2018 0:00:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:10:00", "8/13/2018 0:14:00", "8/13/2018 0:15:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:19:00", "8/13/2018 0:29:00", "8/13/2018 0:38:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:44:00", "8/13/2018 0:45:00", "8/13/2018 0:58:00", 
"8/13/2018 1:01:00"), Value..kW. = 51:62), .Names = c("Timestamp", 
"Value..kW."), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -12L))

Look something closer to df2:

Interval    Value
8/13/2018 0:00:00   51
8/13/2018 0:15:00   55
8/13/2018 0:30:00   57
8/13/2018 0:45:00   60
8/13/2018 1:00:00   61

Please note the secondsas well. I'm thinking the nalocf function from zoo and dplyr or data.table could get me partway there. Open to other packages.

5
  • 1
    Your structure, as provided ,does not include the seconds – Andrew Lavers Aug 20 '18 at 19:49
  • Updated - thank you! – longlivebrew Aug 20 '18 at 19:53
  • 1
    Why don't 8/12/2018 23:15:00 and 8/13/2018 01:15:00 get values? Sounds like you have an implicit interval in mind for which you want the values, but you don't mention it. – Mikko Marttila Aug 20 '18 at 20:32
  • Also, if it's the closest previous value you want (as the expected output and your opening sentence indicate) you should update the title to reflect that, too. Both answers that you got answer the question for nearest value, not closest previous. – Mikko Marttila Aug 20 '18 at 20:35
  • 1
    Again, the data provided in structure(...) do not match the printed df. In structure(..) the seconds have been truncated. – Uwe Aug 21 '18 at 8:14
4

This could be a good application for data.table rolling joins with the "nearest" option.

The first step is to get the data into a data.table type object with a properly formatted POSIXct timestamp.

library(data.table)

DT <- structure(list(Timestamp = c("8/12/2018 23:00:00", "8/13/2018 0:00:00", 
                             "8/13/2018 0:10:00", "8/13/2018 0:14:00", "8/13/2018 0:15:00", 
                             "8/13/2018 0:19:00", "8/13/2018 0:29:00", "8/13/2018 0:38:00", 
                             "8/13/2018 0:44:00", "8/13/2018 0:45:00", "8/13/2018 0:58:00", 
                             "8/13/2018 1:01:00"), Value..kW. = 51:62), .Names = c("Timestamp", 
                                                                                   "Value..kW."), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -12L))
## Convert from data.frame to data.table
setDT(DT)

## Convert to POSIXct
DT[,Timestamp := as.POSIXct(Timestamp, format = "%m/%d/%Y %H:%M:%S", tz = "UTC")]

Once you have that, you can generate another table with your 15 minute interval sequence.

## Get Start and Ends
Start <- min(as.POSIXct(cut.POSIXt(DT[,Timestamp],breaks = c("15 min")), tz = "UTC"))
End <- max(as.POSIXct(cut.POSIXt(DT[,Timestamp],breaks = c("15 min")), tz = "UTC"))
## Generate data.table with a sequence
SummaryDT <- data.table(TimeStamp15 = seq.POSIXt(from = Start, to = End, by = "15 min"))

print(SummaryDT)
#            TimeStamp15
# 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00
# 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00
# 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00
# 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00
# 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00
# 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00
# 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00
# 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00
# 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00

Then, you can set keys and get the closest value to each 15 minute time using a rolling join update.

## Set keys
setkey(SummaryDT,TimeStamp15)
setkey(DT,Timestamp)

## Create a new column in SummaryDT with the closest measurement
SummaryDT[DT, Closest_Value_kW := `i.Value..kW.` , roll = "nearest"]
print(SummaryDT)
#            TimeStamp15 Closest_Value_kW
# 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00               51
# 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00               NA
# 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00               NA
# 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00               NA
# 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00               52
# 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00               56
# 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00               57
# 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00               60
# 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00               62

If you're new to data.table this may be quite a bit to digest, this example is on the advanced end of the spectrum -- the Getting Started page on the data.table site might be a good place to start if you haven't used data.table at all before.

Executing help("data.table") will give you a succinct write-up, but there's a one good example of some of the capabilities written up by Ben Gorman on his blog -- Gorman Analysis: R – Data.Table Rolling Joins and another by Rober Norberg on his blog bRogramming: Understanding data.table Rolling Joins that might help get a better understanding.

Update: It looks like you might want to only carry forward observations instead of necessarily doing the "closest" value -- In that case an option would be as follows:

(Using the same DT as a starting point)

## Get Start and Ends
Start <- min(as.POSIXct(cut.POSIXt(DT[,Timestamp],breaks = c("15 min")), tz = "UTC"))
End <- max(as.POSIXct(cut.POSIXt(DT[,Timestamp],breaks = c("15 min"),), tz = "UTC"))
## Generate data.table with a sequence
SummaryDT <-data.table(TimeStamp15 = seq.POSIXt(from = Start, to = End, by = "15 min"))

## Set keys
setkey(SummaryDT,TimeStamp15)
setkey(DT,Timestamp)
## Do a rolling join
FinalDT <- DT[SummaryDT, roll = +Inf]

print(FinalDT)
#              Timestamp Value..kW.
# 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00         51
# 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
# 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         51
# 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         51
# 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         52
# 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
# 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
# 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
# 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
1
  • (+1) I like data.table rolling joins, and it's good to mention them here, but FWIW I also think it's a bit overkill for a problem like this where you don't actually need to join two time series together, rather you really just want to round values in a single time series. Likely to come in handy later down the analysis though, in a real join usecase. – Mikko Marttila Aug 21 '18 at 6:22
1

this may differ a little from your example result. I am not sure your example output is 100% correct. e.g what about the data from 12/8?

Library lubridate has many useful date time features. This converts the character to date and rounds to the nearest period. (There are floor_date and ceiling_date function as well that round down or up respectively).

library(dplyr) 
library(lubridate)
df %>% 
  # ensure timestamp is a date type and round to the nearest fifteen minutes
  mutate(ts = mdy_hm(Timestamp),
         period = round_date(ts, unit = "15 minutes")) %>%
  # group into periods 
  group_by(period) %>%
  # grab the first row in each period, orderd by the timestamp (use -1 for last)
  top_n(-1, ts) %>%
  # order the reuslt
  arrange(period)

#   Timestamp       Value..kW. ts                  period             
#   <chr>                <int> <dttm>              <dttm>             
# 1 8/12/2018 23:00         51 2018-08-12 23:00:00 2018-08-12 23:00:00
# 2 8/13/2018 0:00          52 2018-08-13 00:00:00 2018-08-13 00:00:00
# 3 8/13/2018 0:10          53 2018-08-13 00:10:00 2018-08-13 00:15:00
# 4 8/13/2018 0:29          57 2018-08-13 00:29:00 2018-08-13 00:30:00
# 5 8/13/2018 0:38          58 2018-08-13 00:38:00 2018-08-13 00:45:00
3
  • Even though the title says otherwise, it seems closest previous value is the goal here. So you'd want ceiling_date() instead of round_date(). – Mikko Marttila Aug 20 '18 at 20:28
  • @MikkoMarttila for previous value, wouldn't it be floor_date, not ceiling_date? Ceiling functions round up/into the future – camille Aug 20 '18 at 20:55
  • @camille you want to round the original times up because a value at time 00:01 should count for the measurement at time 00:15, not 00:00 where it hasn't happened yet. – Mikko Marttila Aug 21 '18 at 6:18
1

Depending on the structure of the input data and the expected ressult, the OP has several choices.

From the question and the sample dataset, it is not fully clear what the expected result should look like if the input data contain gaps, i.e., intervals longer than 15 minutes where no data have been recorded. How does the OP wants the gaps in the input data to be reflected in the result?

EDIT: The OP has provided two slightly different datasets. Both are used below to demonstrate the impact of the input data on the result.

The variants below will use lubridate and data.table. It is assumed that df is already ordered by Timesstamp.

Preparation

This is needed for all variants:

library(lubridate)
library(data.table)
setDT(df)[, Timestamp := mdy_hms(Timestamp)]

Aggregate to next 15 min interval (with gaps in result)

The simplest solution is to aggegate to the next 15 min interval:

df[, .SD[.N], by = .(Interval = ceiling_date(Timestamp, "15 min"))]
              Interval Value..kW.
1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00         51
2: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         52
3: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
4: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
5: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
6: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
7: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Note that between row 1 and 2 there is a gap of 1 hour where 3 intervals are missing.

For the sake of completeness, here is a variant which works also with unordered data.

df[, .SD[which.max(Timestamp)], keyby = .(Interval = ceiling_date(Timestamp, "15 min"))]

EDIT: With the other dataset (without truncated seconds) we get

df0[, .SD[.N], by = .(Interval = ceiling_date(Timestamp, "15 min"))]
1: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
2: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
3: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
4: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
5: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
6: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Please, note that without truncated seconds the values are moved to next interval.

Aggregate to next 15 min interval without gaps in result

step <- "15 min"
df[, .SD[.N], by = .(Interval = ceiling_date(Timestamp, step))][
  .(seq(min(Interval), max(Interval), step)), on = .(Interval = V1)]

Here we join a sequence of timestamps to complete the missing intervals:

               Interval Value..kW.
 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00         51
 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         NA
 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         NA
 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         NA
 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         52
 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
10: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Now the gap becomes visible in the result by the NA values.

EDIT: With the other dataset (without truncated seconds) we get

df0[, .SD[.N], by = .(Interval = ceiling_date(Timestamp, step))][
  .(seq(min(Interval), max(Interval), step)), on = .(Interval = V1)]
              Interval Value..kW.
1: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
2: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         NA
3: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         NA
4: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         NA
5: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
6: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
7: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
8: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
9: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Rolling join (gaps filled with data in result)

This is a streamlined version of Matt's approach

step = "15 min"
df[.(seq(floor_date(min(Timestamp), step), ceiling_date(max(Timestamp), step),by = step)), 
   on = .(Timestamp = V1), roll = TRUE]
              Timestamp Value..kW.
 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00         51
 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         51
 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         51
 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         52
 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
10: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Here, the gap is filled with data which were copied from the latest available value. From looking at the result, it is no longer visible that there was a gap in the input data.

EDIT: With the other dataset (without truncated seconds) we get

df0[.(seq(floor_date(min(Timestamp), step), ceiling_date(max(Timestamp), step),by = step)), 
   on = .(Timestamp = V1), roll = TRUE]
              Timestamp Value..kW.
 1: 2018-08-12 23:00:00         NA
 2: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
 3: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         51
 4: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         51
 5: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         51
 6: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
 7: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
 8: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
 9: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
10: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Here, we have an unfilled gap in the first row. This is caused by the way the sequence of intervals is contructed. It can be avoided be a slight modification

df0[.(seq(ceiling_date(min(Timestamp), step), ceiling_date(max(Timestamp), step),by = step)), 
    on = .(Timestamp = V1), roll = TRUE]

             Timestamp Value..kW.
1: 2018-08-12 23:15:00         51
2: 2018-08-12 23:30:00         51
3: 2018-08-12 23:45:00         51
4: 2018-08-13 00:00:00         51
5: 2018-08-13 00:15:00         55
6: 2018-08-13 00:30:00         57
7: 2018-08-13 00:45:00         60
8: 2018-08-13 01:00:00         61
9: 2018-08-13 01:15:00         62

Data

Th OP has provided data as dput()

df <-
structure(list(Timestamp = c("8/12/2018 23:00:00", "8/13/2018 0:00:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:10:00", "8/13/2018 0:14:00", "8/13/2018 0:15:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:19:00", "8/13/2018 0:29:00", "8/13/2018 0:38:00", 
"8/13/2018 0:44:00", "8/13/2018 0:45:00", "8/13/2018 0:58:00", 
"8/13/2018 1:01:00"), Value..kW. = 51:62), .Names = c("Timestamp", 
"Value..kW."), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -12L))

EDIT: The OP has provided two slightly different datasets:

  1. as dput() with seconds truncated (df in this answer)
  2. as printed df in the question witout truncated seconds (df0 in this answer)

This subtle difference impacts the results. So, here is the dataset as printed:

df0 <- data.frame(
readr::read_table("        Timestamp   Value.(kW)
8/12/2018 23:00:06  51
8/13/2018 0:00:16   52
8/13/2018 0:10:26   53
8/13/2018 0:14:36   54
8/13/2018 0:15:00   55
8/13/2018 0:19:57   56
8/13/2018 0:29:09   57
8/13/2018 0:38:17   58
8/13/2018 0:44:59   59
8/13/2018 0:45:00   60
8/13/2018 0:58:47   61
8/13/2018 1:01:57   62
"))
# prepare
library(lubridate)
library(data.table)
setDT(df0)[, Timestamp := mdy_hms(Timestamp)]

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