73

What is the simplest way to count the number of occurrences of a specific character in a string?

That is, I need to write a function, countTheCharacters(), so that

str = "the little red hen"
count = countTheCharacters(str,"e") ' Count should equal 4
count = countTheCharacters(str,"t") ' Count should equal 3
3
  • The fastest way is not to use a string. If you really interested in speed you should look for something else.
    – habakuk
    Feb 19, 2016 at 10:13
  • 1
    @habakuk, what non-string value could the OP use instead of "the little red hen"?
    – johny why
    Mar 8, 2016 at 22:10
  • @johnywhy use a StringBuilder. See msdn.microsoft.com/de-de/library/…
    – habakuk
    Mar 9, 2016 at 21:43

26 Answers 26

79

The most straightforward is to simply loop through the characters in the string:

Public Function CountCharacter(ByVal value As String, ByVal ch As Char) As Integer
  Dim cnt As Integer = 0
  For Each c As Char In value
    If c = ch Then 
      cnt += 1
    End If
  Next
  Return cnt
End Function

Usage:

count = CountCharacter(str, "e"C)

Another approach that is almost as effective and gives shorter code is to use LINQ extension methods:

Public Function CountCharacter(ByVal value As String, ByVal ch As Char) As Integer
  Return value.Count(Function(c As Char) c = ch)
End Function
6
  • 1
    I came here looking for the fastest approach, not necessarily the most elegant one. This is quick, but can be made about 10% quicker by using For i as Integer = 0 to value.Length - 1 instead of a For Each loop. Aug 13, 2014 at 19:34
  • 'Count' is not a member of 'String'. Oct 14, 2014 at 14:57
  • 1
    @Panzercrisis: The Count method is an extension method to IEnumerable<T>, and String implements IEnumerable<char>. If you get a compiler error like that, you are missing the using System.Linq; reference at the top of the page.
    – Guffa
    Oct 14, 2014 at 17:14
  • 2
    This logic can be used for VBA as well: Public Function CountCharacter(ByVal value As String, ByVal ch As Char) As Integer Dim cnt As Integer For Each c In value If c = ch Then cnt = cnt + 1 End If Next CountCharacter = cnt End Function Dec 9, 2014 at 16:28
  • 2
    The code in the answer and in the comments do not paste into VBA and work on the first try. Here is some VBA code in case somebody is looking for it: Private Function CountCharacter(WhatToSearch As String, SearchForThis As String) As Long Dim NumberOfHits As Long Dim i As Long For i = 1 To Len(WhatToSearch) If Mid(WhatToSearch, i, 1) = SearchForThis Then NumberOfHits = NumberOfHits + 1 End If Next CountCharacter = NumberOfHits End Function Mar 31, 2016 at 11:10
70

This is the simple way:

text = "the little red hen"
count = text.Split("e").Length -1 ' Equals 4
count = text.Split("t").Length -1 ' Equals 3
6
  • 2
    This gives not always the correct number if the start letter or/and endletter is the one to count
    – Reman
    Jul 23, 2013 at 12:11
  • 1
    @Remonn It always gives the correct number for me. The only way it doesn't count start/end letters is if you pass SplitStringOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries as the second parameter to Split() Sep 6, 2013 at 17:46
  • 1
    This is simple, but it creates a bunch of strings that are not even used for anything.
    – Guffa
    Oct 14, 2014 at 19:17
  • @Guffa, since the split is not applied to a variable, won't any memory allocated to the split be released immediately, or as soon as we exit the function? Depends on specific language, i suppose....
    – johny why
    Mar 8, 2016 at 22:16
  • 2
    @johnywhy: The memory is not released immediately, the strings remain in memory until the garbage collector can collect them. Short lived objects are quite common and the garbage collector is optimised to handle them efficiently, but they still increase the allocation throughput and causes more work for the garbage collector. This is handled by the framework, so it's the same for all .NET languages.
    – Guffa
    Mar 8, 2016 at 22:40
34

You can try this

Dim occurCount As Integer = Len(testStr) - Len(testStr.Replace(testCharStr, ""))
2
  • 4
    Divide your answer by Len(testCharStr) and Ceil it to work this for occurences of strings also. Feb 11, 2013 at 10:17
  • nice thing about this method is, it uses very basic fx. No LINQ, RegEx, or other extra libraries. Can be easily duplicated in various languages.
    – johny why
    Mar 8, 2016 at 22:13
21

Here's a simple version.

text.count(function(x) x = "a")

The above would give you the number of a's in the string. If you wanted to ignore case:

text.count(function(x) Ucase(x) = "A")

Or if you just wanted to count letters:

text.count(function(x) Char.IsLetter(x) = True)

Give it a shot!

4
  • This doesn't look like a vb.net solution to me.
    – Jonny
    Jan 25, 2017 at 12:22
  • That's a very VB.NET solution!
    – Adam
    Apr 24, 2017 at 10:48
  • Fails. My VS 2017 doesn't have .count for a string.
    – Doug Null
    Oct 20, 2018 at 4:23
  • @DougNull I've gotten away from VB and .Net development. I might mess with this a bit when I get home. Have you tried importing Linq? I'm wondering if that would make a difference. I can assure you that this worked for me and others in the past, but you'll note that the solution was posted in 2014. I don't know if changes that broke this have occurred since then. It would be disappointing to me if they had. Might just be a change in how lambda expressions are implemented?
    – MattB
    Dec 20, 2018 at 23:38
6

Thanks, @guffa. The ability to do it in one line, or even within a longer statement in .NET is very handy. This VB.NET example counts the number of LineFeed characters:

Dim j As Integer = MyString.Count(Function(c As Char) c = vbLf)

j returns the number of LineFeeds in MyString.

5

Or (in VB.NET):

Function InstanceCount(ByVal StringToSearch As String,
                       ByVal StringToFind As String) As Long
    If Len(StringToFind) Then
        InstanceCount = UBound(Split(StringToSearch, StringToFind))
    End If
End Function
5

Conversion of Ujjwal Manandhar's code to VB.NET as follows...

Dim a As String = "this is test"
Dim pattern As String = "t"
Dim ex As New System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(pattern)
Dim m As System.Text.RegularExpressions.MatchCollection
m = ex.Matches(a)
MsgBox(m.Count.ToString())
1
  • thanks, I choose this version. Seems to be very fast as well. I was actually searching for CR and/or LF in a text string, and the frequency so I could adjust the size and height of a textbox in a Gridview to support the output.
    – htm11h
    Mar 3, 2015 at 20:46
3

I think this would be the easiest:

Public Function CountCharacter(ByVal value As String, ByVal ch As Char) As Integer
  Return len(value) - len(replace(value, ch, ""))
End Function
2
Public Class VOWELS

    Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
        Dim str1, s, c As String
        Dim i, l As Integer
        str1 = TextBox1.Text
        l = Len(str1)
        c = 0
        i = 0
        Dim intloopIndex As Integer
        For intloopIndex = 1 To l
            s = Mid(str1, intloopIndex, 1)
            If (s = "A" Or s = "a" Or s = "E" Or s = "e" Or s = "I" Or s = "i" Or s = "O" Or s = "o" Or s = "U" Or s = "u") Then
                c = c + 1
            End If
        Next
        MsgBox("No of Vowels: " + c.ToString)
    End Sub
End Class
2

When I found this solution I was looking for something slightly different as the string I wanted to count was longer than one character, so I came up with this solution:

    Public Shared Function StrCounter(str As String, CountStr As String) As Integer
        Dim Ctr As Integer = 0
        Dim Ptr As Integer = 1
        While InStr(Ptr, str, CountStr) > 0
            Ptr = InStr(Ptr, str, CountStr) + Len(CountStr)
            Ctr += 1
        End While
        Return Ctr
    End Function
2

Using Regular Expressions...

Public Function CountCharacter(ByVal value As String, ByVal ch As Char) As Integer
  Return (New System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(ch)).Matches(value).Count
End Function
2
Public Function CountOccurrences(ByVal StToSerach As String, ByVal StToLookFor As String) As Int32

    Dim iPos = -1
    Dim iFound = 0
    Do
        iPos = StToSerach.IndexOf(StToLookFor, iPos + 1)
        If iPos <> -1 Then
            iFound += 1
        End If<br/>
    Loop Until iPos = -1
    Return iFound
End Function

Code Usage:

Dim iCountTimes As Integer = CountOccurrences("Can I call you now?", "a")

Also you can have it as an extension:

<Extension()> _
Public Function CountOccurrences(ByVal StToSerach As String, ByVal StToLookFor As String) As Int32
    Dim iPos = -1
    Dim iFound = 0
    Do
        iPos = StToSerach.IndexOf(StToLookFor, iPos + 1)
        If iPos <> -1 Then
            iFound += 1
        End If
    Loop Until iPos = -1
    Return iFound
End Function

Code Usage:

Dim iCountTimes2 As Integer = "Can I call you now?".CountOccurrences("a")
1
  • 1
    On Stack Overflow you can format code using the {} button in the editor. I've made this as an edit for you this time.
    – Flexo
    Jun 16, 2012 at 11:02
2

I suggest you to do it like this:

String.Replace("e", "").Count
String.Replace("t", "").Count

You can also use .Split("e").Count - 1 or .Split("t").Count - 1 respectively, but it gives wrong values if you, for instance have an e or a t at the beginning of the String.

1
  • 1
    Is this vb.net? i don't have visual studio installed, but both dotnetfiddle.net and ideone.com report "'count' is not a member of 'String'."
    – johny why
    Mar 8, 2016 at 22:45
1
eCount = str.Length - Replace(str, "e", "").Length
tCount = str.Length - Replace(str, "t", "").Length
1

Another possibility is to work with Split:

Dim tmp() As String
tmp = Split(Expression, Delimiter)
Dim count As Integer = tmp.Length - 1
1

I use LINQ, and the solution is very simple:

Code in C#:

count = yourString.ToCharArray().Count(c => c == 'e');

The code in a function:

public static int countTheCharacters(string str, char charToCount){
   return str.ToCharArray().Count(c => c == charToCount);
}

Call the function:

count = countTheCharacters(yourString, 'e');
1
  • 1
    I posted something of a vb.net equivalent below.
    – MattB
    Jul 21, 2014 at 21:38
1

What huge codes for something so simple:

In C#, create an extension method and use LINQ.

public static int CountOccurences(this string s, char c)
{
    return s.Count(t => t == c);
}

Usage:

int count = "toto is the best".CountOccurences('t');

Result: 4.

0

I found the best answer :P :

String.ToString.Count - String.ToString.Replace("e", "").Count
String.ToString.Count - String.ToString.Replace("t", "").Count
0

var charCount = "string with periods...".Count(x => '.' == x);

0

I use the following function. It is not the most memory efficient but it is very simple to understand, supports multiple compare methods, is only 4 lines, is fast, mostly works in VBA too, will find not just individual characters but any search string (I often search for VbCrLf (s)).

Only thing missing is the ability to start search from a different "Start"

    Function inStC(myInput As String, Search As String, Optional myCompareMethod As Long = CompareMethod.Text) As Long
        If InStr(1, myInput, Search, myCompareMethod) = 0 Then Return 0
        Return UBound(Split(myInput, Search,, myCompareMethod))
    End Function

One thing I like is that it is compact to use example.

str="the little red hen"
count=inStC(str,"e") 'count should equal 4
count=inStC(str,"t") 'count should equal 3

While I am here, I would like to shill my inStB function, which, instead of returning a count of a string, it will simply return a boolean if the search string is present. I need this function often and this makes my code cleaner.

Function inStB(myInput As String, Search As String, Optional Start As Long = 1, Optional myCompareMethod As Long = CompareMethod.Text) As Boolean
    If InStr(Start, myInput, Search, myCompareMethod) > 0 Then Return True
    Return False
End Function
0

Another possibility is to use a regular expression:

string a = "this is test";
string pattern = "t";
System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex ex = new System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex(pattern);
System.Text.RegularExpressions.MatchCollection m = ex.Matches(a);
MessageBox.Show(m.Count.ToString());

Please convert this into VB.NET.

0

Use:

Function fNbrStrInStr(strin As Variant, strToCount As String)
    fNbrStrInStr = UBound(Split(strin, strToCount)) - LBound(Split(strin, strToCount))
End Function

I used strin as variant to handle very long text. The split can be zero-based or one-based for low end depending on user settings, and subtracting it ensures the correct count.

I did not include a test for strcount being longer than strin to keep code concise.

0
    ' Trying to find the amount of "." in the text
    ' if txtName looks like "hi...hi" then intdots will = 3
    Dim test As String = txtName.Text
    Dim intdots As Integer = 0
    For i = 1 To test.Length
        Dim inta As Integer = 0 + 1
        Dim stra As String = test.Substring(inta)
        If stra = "." Then
            intdots = intdots + 1
        End If
    Next
    txttest.text = intdots
-3
Private Sub Data_KeyPress(sender As Object, e As KeyPressEventArgs) Handles Data.KeyPress
    If Not IsNumeric(e.KeyChar) And Not e.KeyChar = ChrW(Keys.Back) And Not e.KeyChar = "." Then
        e.Handled = True
    Else
        If e.KeyChar = "." And Data.Text.ToCharArray().Count(Function(c) c = ".") > 0 Then
            e.Handled = True
        End If
    End If
End Sub
0
-3

Use:

Dim a
inputString = InputBox("Enter String", "Enter Value", "")

MyString = UCase(inputString)

MsgBox MyString

Dim stringLength

stringLength = Len(MyString)

Dim temp

output = ""

i = 1
Do
    temp = Mid(MyString, i, 1)

    MsgBox temp & i

    CharacterCount = len(MyString) - len(Replace(MyString, temp, ""))

    MyString = Replace(MyString, temp, "")

    output = output & temp & ": " & CharacterCount & vbNewline

Loop While MyString <> ""

MsgBox output
2
-9

Here is the direct code that solves the OP's problem:

        Dim str As String = "the little red hen"

        Dim total As Int32

        Dim Target As String = "e"
        Dim Temp As Int32
        Dim Temp2 As Int32 = -1
Line50:
        Temp = str.IndexOf(Target, Temp2 + 1)
        Temp2 = Temp
        If Temp <> -1 Then

            ' Means there is a target there
            total = total + 1
            GoTo Line50
        End If

        MessageBox.Show(CStr(total))

Now, this is a handy function to solve the OP's problem:

    Public Function CountOccurrence(ByVal YourStringToCountOccurrence As String, ByVal TargetSingleCharacterToCount As String) As Int32
        Dim total As Int32

        Dim Temp As Int32
        Dim Temp2 As Int32 = -1
Line50:
        Temp = YourStringToCountOccurrence.IndexOf(TargetSingleCharacterToCount, Temp2 + 1)
        Temp2 = Temp
        If Temp <> -1 Then

            ' Means there is a target there
            total = total + 1
            GoTo Line50
        Else
            Return total
        End If
    End Function

Example of using the function:

Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
    Dim str As String = "the little red hen"

    MessageBox.Show(CStr(CountOccurrence(str, "e")))
    ' It will return 4
End Sub
1

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