6

I would like to store completed chess games in the database to support users watching replays.

So far I have a singleton GameManager that stores all ongoing games. So within startup.cs I have the following line of code:

services.AddSingleton<IBattleManager, BattleManager>();

Now I would like to have BattleManager access the DbContext to save completed games.

public class BattleManager : IBattleManager
{
    //...
    private void EndGame(ulong gameId)
    {
        var DbContext = WhatDoIPutHere?
        lock(gameDictionary[gameId])
        {
            DbContext.Replays.Add(new ReplayModel(gameDictionary[gameId]));
            gameDictionary.Remove(gameId)
        }
    }
}

Is it possible to anyhow achieve this? How?

Failed attempts:

public class BattleManager : IBattleManager
{
    Data.ApplicationDbContext _context;
    public BattleManager(Data.ApplicationDbContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }
}

This will clearly fail since one cannot inject EF Core DbContext into a Singleton service like that.

I have a vague feeling that I should do something of this kind:

using (var scope = WhatDoIPutHere.CreateScope())
{
    var DbContext = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<ApplicationDbContext>();
    DbContext.Replays.Add(new ReplayModel(...));
}

Is this the right direction?

  • Normally, DbContext is registered as Scope. Why do you want to register as Singleton? – Win Aug 20 '18 at 23:02
  • @Win I know DbContext is registered as Scope. I dont want to register it as Singleton. However, I need a Singleton (GameManager) to write stuff to the database. Is it possible at all? My thinking is that I need to somehow CreateScope in a method of GameManager so that DbContext can safely reside there without violating its Scopeness. – gaazkam Aug 20 '18 at 23:07
  • Or can Singletons never access the database, period, full stop, because we may not, should not use Scoped services inside Singletons in any way? – gaazkam Aug 20 '18 at 23:08
  • Perhaps you should ask yourself why you think you need a Singleton IBattleManager. What do you gain from this? Why can't multiple instances of it exist? If you make it Scope does it break anything? – Brad Aug 20 '18 at 23:21
  • 1
    @Brad 1) The BattleManager needs to remember all turns prior to the turn it is currently processing. I thought since it needs to persistently remember all ongoing games it should be a singleton. 2) The battle manager is not called by razor pages, but rather by a SignalR Hub. – gaazkam Aug 20 '18 at 23:29
12

You're on the right track. The IServiceScopeFactory can do that.

public class BattleManager : IBattleManager {

    private readonly IServiceScopeFactory scopeFactory;

    public BattleManager(IServiceScopeFactory scopeFactory)
    {
        this.scopeFactory = scopeFactory;
    }

    public void MyMethod() {
        using(var scope = scopeFactory.CreateScope()) 
        {
            var db = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<DbContext>();

            // when we exit the using block,
            // the IServiceScope will dispose itself 
            // and dispose all of the services that it resolved.
        }
    }
}

The DbContext will behave like it has a Transient scope within that using statement.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is where I ended up as well but many people say injecting the service provider is an anti-pattern. I'm exactly sure why, but this seems like a common issue where a service is running in the background and needs to talk to a database (DbContext). I wonder if there is any additional guidance on how to handle this common scenario without making a DbContext a singleton and avoiding antipattern by injecting service provider interfaces. – Geekn Aug 4 '19 at 2:59
  • 1
    I think people get too hung up on injecting the IServiceProvider being an anti-pattern. Their reasoning being that if you change your DI container, then you have swap it out with whatever the container provides. Frankly, at the end of the day, you need to solve a problem and have working code and taking a dependency that's considered "anti-pattern" seems like the tiniest of worries. Besides, if you're swapping out DI containers, you're probably going to be doing a decent amount of bug fixes here and there until it works completely anyway. I say don't worry about it. I didn't. – Gup3rSuR4c Aug 29 '19 at 0:29

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